General Poetry posted December 27, 2017


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Would Shakespeare approve

Stubble, stubble . . .

by Dolly'sPoems

Stubble, Stubble . . .

Shall I compare thee to a rainy day?
Thou art more dismal . . . more miserable.
Rough winds do shake the snowy storms we play.
Winter's shave made you much less lovable.

Sometime too harsh the facade of man grinds.
Not often is his grey chin stubble trimmed;
And this fair maiden sometimes then declines.
By chance, nature's lights often better dimmed.

But thy eternal winter cloud has stayed;
Nor fain it's dower expression showest.
Nor shall death brag a more grey ghost-like shade;
When externally hairs creep and growest.

So long as men can breathe or eyes can see,
so long lives this, and this gives pain to thee.




Recognized


This is a take on the famous Shakespeare sonnet, just a bit of fun!
This is the original:

Shall I compare thee to a summer's day?
(Sonnet 18)

Shall I compare thee to a summer's day?
Thou art more lovely and more temperate.
Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May,
And summer's lease hath all too short a date.

Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shines,
And often is his gold complexion dimmed;
And every fair from fair sometime declines,
By chance, or nature's changing course, untrimmed;

But thy eternal summer shall not fade,
Nor lose possession of that fair thou owest,
Nor shall death brag thou wanderest in his shade,
When in eternal lines to time thou growest.

So long as men can breathe or eyes can see,
So long lives this, and this gives life to thee.
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