Satire Poetry posted May 6, 2017


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Potlatch Challenge-Roundel

White House Weak-- Crime Prosecution

by michaelcahill



White House Weak on Criminal Prosecution

 
 

Let's lock somebody up, it's clear we should.
The fake news calls for old Slick Willy's wife.
Well, Trump and Breitbart think that's good.
Let's lock somebody up!
 

The alt-right claims Obama's gay and took Joan River's life,
Michele's a dude and sportin' massive wood.
Trump's a wuss, can't catch them, though the crime is rife.
 

Isn't that Steve Bannon hidin' under that white hood?
Watch out Kushner, I think he's got a knife!
Trump swears he tells only truth-- would not lie if he could ...
Let's lock somebody up!

 


keystonecops1


 


Recognized



The full title doesn't fit.

I chose the Trump Presidency 2017 as my topic. :))

An Event from History

A few examples of such poems include: (in case you need ideas)

John Brown's Body by Stephen Vincent Benet
Civil War by Charles Dawson Shanly
O Captain! My Captain! by Walt Whitman
The Charge of the Light Brigade by Alfred, Lord Tennyson
The Blue and the Gray by Francis Miles Finch
A Message by Elizabeth Stuart Phelps Ward
Boston by Ralph Waldo Emerson
The Eve of Waterloo by Lord Byron
Shiloh: A Requiem (April, 1862) by Herman Melville

Poetry Potlatch May 6, 2017
Roundel
A roundel (not to be confused with the rondel) is a form of verse used in English language poetry devised by Algernon Charles Swinburne (1837 - 1909). It is the Anglo-Norman form corresponding to the French rondeau. It makes use of refrains, repeated according to a certain stylized pattern.
A roundel consists of nine lines each having approximately the same number of syllables, plus a refrain after the third line and after the last line. The refrain must be identical with the beginning of the first line: it may be a half-line, and rhymes with the second line. It has three stanzas and its rhyme scheme is as follows: A B A R; B A B; A B A R; where R is the refrain.
(The form actually calls for lines of the same syllable length, but Swinburne couldn't follow his own rules, so I've amended this to approximate. You may use as many syllables per line as you choose.)


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