FanStory.com
"Little Poems"


Chapter 2
senryu (dumped)

By Treischel

when things get too tense
with pressure that overwhelms
I often just go

Author Notes Just some bad bathroom humor. Not my usual.

Thanks to amfunny for the artwork, The Stinker


Chapter 3
senryu (santa)

By Treischel


grew out hair for year
channeled my inner santa
now i've clean cut chin

Author Notes Self portrait photograph from August 2012

After I got laid off and took retirement, didn't cut hair or beard for a year.
Tried to get a job as Santa, but found it a very competitive and overcrowded field.
Got tired of the snaggs and snarles, so cut it off.


Chapter 4
hailezaine (trail tale)

By Treischel

Trail Tale
(A Hailezaine[Haiku-Triplet-Quinzaine] poem)




exiting dark shady vale
horses on the trail
swish their tail

Author Notes I noted this format when I was reviewing, and found that there was a writing prompt for it. Too late to enter, I'm intrigued. So here is my attempt at one.

This poem in a Hailezaine formatted poem).
A HAILEZAINE must be written in three lines.
It has the syllable count of a Quinzaine (verse of 15 syllables divided in three lines) as 7/5/3, and rhyming scheme of aaa, like a Triplet and content of a Haiku. Lack of punctuation and capitalization is characteristic of a Haiku. Thus the name is an amalgamation of all three.

The picture is a photograph I took last weekend, 7/20 to be exact, while out and about. Two unknown female riders passed me on the trail.


Chapter 5
Les Miserables(senryu sequence

By Treischel

Les Miserables


Les Miserables
who knew that a Crowe can sing
in the end he croaked

Jean Valjean survives
Jackman sings through tragedy
overcomes all odds

Anne Hathaway shines
as she is pummeled and dies
stunning emotion

Cosette carries hope
as she steals Marius' heart
Thenardiers thwarted

degenerate France
misguided revolution
epic passions flair

singing juggernaut
triumph over tragedy
overwhelming cast

Author Notes A Movie that Sang every line.

Croaked meaning died. In the end the despairing and disillusioned Javert, played by Russell Crowe throws himself into the River spillway.

The Thenardiers are an immoral couple that Cosette must get free from, who harass her and Jean Valjean throughout.

Many thanks to cammycards for use of the artwork, Lady in Distress


Chapter 6
tanka (the end of the day)

By Treischel

when the day is done
the shops and courts have all closed
as the sun goes down
say goodbye to the rat race
it puts a smile on your face

Author Notes Rush hour

A photograph at rush hour in St. Paul, Minnesota from my collection. Looking down West 7th Street on a February evening. The State Capital is in middle right edge of the photo. A green light on the left edge.


Chapter 7
Christ the King (1-6-1 Poem)

By Treischel

SING
Gifts to our Savior Bring
KING

Author Notes A Christmas 1-6-1 Poem

Thanks to Microsoft Clip Art for the Image.


Chapter 8
Bubble Gum

By Treischel


Bubble Gum
(Nonet)





I chew and purse my lips, then blow slow,
With a steady pace, watch it grow.
Bubble covers my whole face.
Oh, Oh! Might be trouble!
Too big this bubble!
I just can't stop,
Bulging eyes!
Puff, puff,
POP!

Author Notes On my Face!

For the contest.

A Nonet is a poem with 9 lines that get shorter with each line as it reduces from 9 syllables to one.

Picture from Yahoo Images


Chapter 10
Float

By Treischel

FLOAT
To drift
Sail Away

On the surging Sea
New sails all torn and rent
Raging! Stormy! Violent!

"So glad my small boat is Buoyant"

Author Notes When trouble strikes you need support
Alliteration and rhyme

Thanks to Mrjames for the beautiful artwork Sailboa2


Chapter 11
Comfort and Strife(Tetractys)

By Treischel

When
Life is
Full of Strife
And Nowhere's Safe
Turn to God and Family for Comforting

Author Notes My first try at this format

Thanks to Visionary for the artwork, Living Stones


Chapter 12
Falling

By Treischel


Down, into the Depths I slowly fell.
Falling to the very Gates of Hell.
Floating hopelessly, Arms About.
Oh Help! Please Help! I Scream!
Someone hear my Shout!
No Nightmire Dream.
Bottom's Near!
OH Dear!
NO!

Author Notes I created this picture from a photograph of my grandson who was pouting and didn't want his picture taken. Then a little PhotoShop and Bam. I got him the little bugger! Didn't have to throw his picture out after all.


Chapter 13
Careless Legacy

By Treischel


Where ever you walk, do not stumble,
For you may take a dreadful tumble.
So please try avoid each craggy crack,
Or you may just wind up on your back.

Bananna peels might just make you slip
And could cause a very nasty trip
Then history's weather may not erase
The imprint left by your flattened face.

Author Notes Just a little poem about leaving an impression.

Downtown St. Paul had a contest to put 15 new concrete sidewalks around a market square. They asked local poets to submit poems. The 15 winning poems would be imprinted in the cement. I submitted this poem.

Thank you for the artwork CitySlicker by PixelArtisan from FanArt Review.


Chapter 14
ROOST

By Treischel

Roost
Sit Branch
Birds in Tree

Black-suited birds sit
Watching for right moment
Recent road-kill makes them fly

"When murder's call sits in the air"

Author Notes Crows are very noisy birds, especially when several are roosted in a tree, but also in flight.
In any case the noise is a cocophony.

A group of crows is called a Murder.

Author's own artwork.


Chapter 15
ode haiku (eagle thoughts)

By Treischel

to be an eagle
free to soar the mountain heights
rabbit's dying wish

Author Notes Top of the food chain

Author's photograph


Chapter 16
Sanity

By Treischel


Sanity

Is measured

By the yardstick

Of the

Masses

*

Those who are

Different

Are quite often

Considered

Insane

Author Notes Just a Thought

Picture from my collection


Chapter 17
Just GO

By Treischel

JUST GO



Go
be free.
You can see
the world before
you lose youth's early key,
as all life's problems close the door
with work, wife and kids, making things a chore.
Later, when we know, and have all our ducks in row,
seeking the big change, couple hits the floor,
heads for that longed-for shining shore.
At last, we're now ready!
World don't ignore.
Finally Free!
So, we
Go.

Author Notes The best times in life to see the world, are either while young before you're tied down, or after you retire.

This poem is a Diatelle.
A diatelle has a set syllable count and a set rhyme.
The syllable count is: 1-2-3-4-6-8-10-12-10-8-6-4-3-2-1,
The rhyme pattern is: abbcbccaccbcbba.It is usually displayed centered.

The photograph is mine. It's meant to convey traveling at the sunset of your life.


Chapter 18
Uncharacteristically

By Treischel

A Teacup Dictionary Poem of 8 Syllables
UNCHARACTERISTICALLY



UNCHARACTERISTICALLY
Not so distinguishable
Not identafiable
Non - identical
Not typical
Really odd
A change
Strange
Beyond the known expected range


Author Notes Thought I'd try this format. Not too crazy about it. I rhymed as much as possible. Otherwise too much like a dictionary definition. Here's the requirements as laid out in Poetry Dances.

In a teacup dictionary poem the dictionary word is the title. Each following line must define the word, but drops one syllable per line, starting with the first line decending until there is a one syllable word that defines the dictionary word. The next line, must have the same number of syllables as the dictionary word and makes an observation about the dictionary word or the preceeding lines. The poem is usually centered on the page.

The teacup dictionary poem was created by Rose Jones in 2009.

For my poem, I chose an 8 Syllable Word, so syllable count went 8,7,6,5,4,3,2,1. Rhyme scheme was abbbbcddd.

The Picture is from Microsoft Clip Art Images


Chapter 19
Sun and Moon

By Treischel

Sun and Moon
(A Trigee Poem)

When sunlight settles in the sky..............When moon brings out her mellow beams
With brilliant hues of orange and red.......As evening draws its shadows long
Which darken as the day goes by............We then can formulate our dreams
We'll seek a place to rest our head..........Then listen to the evening song

Author Notes Often as dusk progresses, you have both the sunset and the moonrise at different spots in the sky.

The Picture belongs to the Poet


Chapter 20
A Bullet Poem

By Treischel

The Bullet Poem


Experimenting with this new tool
A bullet poem, I see
Provoking the Muse of this old fool
To find what's meant to be

Avoids disdain for repeated lines
Three syllables that last
With poetic structure it defines
And catches on real fast

Ritchie's clever creativity,
He should be very proud
Invented a new activity
Standing above the crowd

I'm most delighted with this new tool
A new style Poem, I see
Relaxes the mind of this old fool
A dream that's meant to be

Author Notes Though I'd give this bullett Poem Format a Shot

Created by Ritchie, a poet on this FanStory site who identifies himself as 9999pool. He's quite an energetic fellow, ready to try and help promote anything new. He invented this last week while writing a tribute to the artist Angelheart whose is renowned on our our sister site, FanArt Review. Ritchie is trying to convince her to stay for another two years. You can read about it in his poem, An Angel's Heart.

This is a new form 'poollet' or fondly called 'bullet'. The last three syllables of every line in the 1st and last stanza are repeated as some poets do not like repeating lines.

Credit for the artwork goes to Microsoft Clip Art.


Chapter 21
Red Rose

By Treischel



a lovely red rose
beautiful bloom from a bud
curlicue center
scarlet petals that entwine
like the fire in my heart

Author Notes A Rose for my honey

This photograph is from my collection. Taken in the Lief Erikson Rose Garden in Duluth, Minnesota with the morning dew. It stimulated the creation of this verse . It will become part of my picture poems.


Chapter 22
Gentleman's Kiss

By Treischel

Gentleman's Kiss



When this gentleman steals a kiss,
How will a fair maiden respond?
Will she sweetly swoon from the bliss,
When this gentleman steals a kiss,
Or push him away with a hiss?
He prays that her reaction is fond,
When this gentleman steals a kiss,
How will a fair maiden respond?

Author Notes A little romantic inquiry

I give thanks for Artwork by 4 I AM at FanArtReview.com


Chapter 23
haiku (rainbow's end)

By Treischel

haiku (rainbow's end)



at the rainbow's end
there's a perfect pot of gold
first the rain must fall


Author Notes There's a Storm before the Rainbow

Artwork care of Microsoft Clip Art


Chapter 24
Spiritual Path

By Treischel






P
ray first for Wisdom

Q
uit being a fraud

R
ead the Holy Word

S
peak soft to your God

T
hen will the Gates of Heaven be opened





Author Notes Some Spiritual Thoughts.

Author's Photograph of Cathedral of St. Paul in Fall


Chapter 25
naani (false security)

By Treischel

False Secutity
(A Naani Poem)


when security is based on guns
human life
goes at fast clip
as automatic weapons apply

Author Notes Large capacity gun clips have no domestic justification.

This Naani has 25 syllables

Picture is from Microsoft clip art.


Chapter 26
Season's Go Round

By Treischel

Season Go Round
(A Gertuu Poem)

*~*


Seasons go round
Carousel
Changing fast

Pretty horses
Going up
And then down

There is Winter
The blue one
Flying past

Then a wet Spring
Comes in sight
Colored brown

Sizzling Summer's
Red hot ride
Is so bold

Then the peacock
Autumn comes
Feathered gold

They swing around
Then come back
Once again

Season's cycle
Carousel
Now, and then

Author Notes I think the seasons are like a Merry-go-round. They go round and round and up and down.

This is a Gertuu Poem.
This is a new format style created by 'Gert Sherwood', fondly called the 'Gertuu' (double 'u'). It has a 4-3-3 syllable count of any number of stanzas.
The merit of this style is that many poets preferred short phrases and words within each line, making the poem very 'punchy' and 'striking' writings.
Good for writing 'rhetoric' or 'slogan shouting' poems.

Photo is the Poets


Chapter 27
senryu (really?)

By Treischel



to contest sponsor
men's point is between their legs
you must not get it

Author Notes As a man I wondered how I should respond to this prompt that seems exclusionary and insulting with an attempt to be playful. Then I thought of it.

Thanks FanArt Review for Balls by GaliaG


Chapter 28
Fight Another Day

By Treischel


Defeat
The lead Platoon's been soundly Beat
Retreat

Author Notes A little 1-6-1 Poem. Missed the contest, but thought I'd post. Saving $5, likely.

Picture courtecy of Microsoft ClipArt.


Chapter 30
Morning Coffee

By Treischel

Morning Coffee



Woke to sweet smell of a scented brew
With rich aroma coming through
Fragrance beckons me awake
Got the cobwebs to shake
Crave a cup or two
Here's how I think
Take a drink
Cup tips
Sips

Author Notes I have to have two cups in the morning to get the brain working. Java Therapy

The Starbuck's cup is one at the house, that the author got as part of a gift set.

The photograph is the author's.


Chapter 31
Musing

By Treischel

Musing



Wile away in reverie
The hours, the hours
Passing quickly in deep thought
Quips come and go
A mental show
Scraps to put upon the page


Author Notes Capturing Thoughts from my Muse

Thought I'd write a Free Verse Poem just to remember that everything doesn't have to Rhyme

This poem has a syllable count of 747447.

I took this picture in a friend's back yard of her garden nymph. It looks to me like it is blowing out beautiful thoughts.


Chapter 32
Chore List

By Treischel

Chore List

Wash the dishes,     walk the dog,     feed the fishes
Walk the dog,        vacuum hair,     walk the dog
Make some soup,   walk the dog,    pick up poop

Dang dog!
 

Author Notes Sometime Pets are a Pain

This Poem is in a Tic-Tac-Toe Format

The picture is from Microsoft ClipArt


Chapter 33
Dog Tired

By Treischel


he is dog gone tired
the tempo da-DUM da-DUM
iambic fatigue

Author Notes Pooch pooped by poetry.

Artwork from MicroSoft ClipArt.


Chapter 34
Wild Waves

By Treischel


Wild Waves



Hawaii has surfing waves
to ride upon those
liquid peaks. Write a Haiku.

Our big lake has got them too
both with wild wet waves
Then lets just Ha-Wai-E-Ku

Turned that 5-7-5 Poem
Inside to outside.
What wonderful things to do!




Author Notes Tired of all those 5-7-5, Haiku, and Senryu. Lets turn them inside out and create a wave with a peak and valley. That's just what Hawaiian Mermaid did. She created this rebellion, "because I can". She calls it a Ha-Wai-E-Ku. So here's my tribute to Ginger, Hawaiian Mermaid.

This poem's syllable count, of 7-5-7, looks like a wave to me. Three waves coming at ya! I added a touch of rhyme and alliteration, some capital letters, punctuation and even an "ing" word. Here's to breaking those rules. Write on Rebel poets!

The picture is of surfers on Lake Superior in March, from the Author's collection.


Chapter 35
Christ Risen

By Treischel



Sacrifice
with God's perfect Lamb
Christ risen


Author Notes The meaning of Easter.

The artwork is from MicroSoft ClipArt.


Chapter 36
5-7-5 Suite, Kid's Spring

By Treischel

Kids Spring

equinox has come
ice is melting off the roof
puddle play for kids

rivulets trickle
curbside cataracts flow free
paper boats and sticks

stomp off the ice shelfs
make a dam with rocks or mud
tiny engineers

the sun shines brightly
grass shows through the melting snow
dogs and kids romp free

Author Notes One of the joys of early spring is the melt

Artwork is from Microsoft ClipArt


Chapter 37
haibun (hunger and desire)

By Treischel


Do you always scratch the itch, or should you sometimes let it be?
 

hunger pulls
to fulfill its need
but beware

I see in nature examples all around me. See little black spider in the grass watching larger female?
There he is, pulled by hunger and desire. Such a luscious hourglass figure and gorgeous red mark on her back that is attracting him. He feels the itch, the pull.

She sees him. Oh yes, she summons him, to share her sip of prey. He approaches her. They share the liquid emulision that once was a grasshopper.

He is intoxicated. She emits a fragrance he cannot resist. He is just what she desires. They dance. They mate.

Thus it begins.
 
a dance of desire
that soon lights the red hot spark
in a flame that consumes

the ultimate hunger
fulfilled when male is eaten
by the Black Widow

Author Notes Something new for me. Hope I did it right.


Chapter 38
Survivor

By Treischel

SURVIVOR



TV's Survivor,
Reality on the beach.
Challenge for favor.
To Outplay, Outwit, Outlast
Where the votes can come real fast.

Join an alliance,
Or be quickly voted out.
Win immunity
To turn poor fortunes about.
Strategy can create doubt!

Devious choices,
Team hurting at challenges,
Can blindside your play.
There are so many voices
That really get in your way.

Watch for the merges.
When alliances break up,
Careful where you roam.
Never believe what your told,
Or find out you're going home.

Author Notes Survivor is one of my favorite programs. I watched yesterday's show and now I was moved to write this poem.

This poem follows the Tanka format of 5-7-5-7-7 syllable count, but not all the Tanka rules. Its actually a suite of 4 Tanka formatted stanzas.

The image is from Yahoo ClipArt, who stated that this image is royalty free.


Chapter 39
Easter Thoughts

By Treischel


Easter Thoughts
(A Tetractys Poem)




Big
Bunny
in basket
at Easter time
Jelly beans and chocolate eggs galore

Purple ribbons and that green shiny grass
festoon handles
and baskets
candy
eggs

Kids
hunting
where ever
for Easter eggs
in the nooks and the crannies of their homes

Then dress them all up in their finest clothes
Heading to church
To worship
Risen
Lord


Author Notes Not too late for Easter memories

This ia a Tetractys Poem in 4 timbling stanzas. The format inspired by Gungalo.

Image from MicroSoft ClipArt


Chapter 40
The Pet

By Treischel


The Pet

(A Scrabble Poem)





Playing Scrabble with Daughter, only

She put out the first word - LONELY

I countered with my word - FRIEND

She spelled Dog adding OG at the end.



Down the L of LONELY, I spelled LOOK.

That was all the suggestion that it took.

To top off FRIEND she made a FIND,

Being that's what she had on her mind.



On FIND's D, I went up to POUND

The place where dogs are found



Then she spelled for me SHEPARD using P

I used an N to say - NATURALLY

While she spelled out  HOUND using SHEPHARD's D




She used the second A, saying she'd take CARE

I made her SWEAR



She promised, so I brought it HOME

We got back LATE

To end this POEM

We think it's GREAT






Author Notes A Friendly game ends with a Pet

This is a Scrabble Poem. Inspired by Indie Skreet. My first attempt. I hope I did OK.

Author's Artwork


Chapter 41
Taxes

By Treischel



Taxes
Duty bound fee
The curse upon my purse
Stuck, while congress passes the buck
Taxes


Author Notes Doing my Taxes today.

This poem is a Cinquain.
A cinquain is written using a pattern. "Cinq" [pronounced SINK] is French for the number 5. This type of poem only has five lines. Each line follows a specific pattern.

There are many ways to write this type of poetry. The traditional cinquain, as developed by Adelaide Crapsey, has five lines and a strict structure based on syllable count.
Line 1: Two syllables
Line 2: Four syllables
Line 3: Six syllables
Line 4: Eight syllables
Line 5: Two syllables

The artwork in from Microsoft ClipArt


Chapter 42
Confession

By Treischel


Stay

your sinful soul's not right today

Pray

Author Notes Get right with the Lord

This is a 1-6-1 Poem., A three line Poem. First line 1 word. Second line 6 words. Third line 1 word.
Total: 3 lines, 8 words

This picture in not me. I got it off MicroSoft ClipArt.


Chapter 43
Ducking Punches

By Treischel

Fist

was wildly swung with massive wrist

Missed



Author Notes He missed. She didn't.

This is a 1-6-1 Poem., A three line Poem. First line 1 word. Second line 6 words. Third line 1 word.
Total: 3 lines, 8 words

The picture is from Microsft ClipArt.


Chapter 44
Orbs of Joy

By Treischel

Orbs of Joy



         Dip the
     Little wand
Deep in soapy suds
        Pull out
Blow softly on ring
   Watch it make
       Bubbles


 

Chase the          
Rounded Spheres      
Through grassy back yard
Get them            
Before they touch ground
The Laughter         
The Joy             

 
Bubble
Drifting in
The warm summer air
Floating
To delight the kids
Happy until
It Pops

Author Notes Blowing bubbles in the back yard

A free verse poem, I tried to make the stanzas shaped like bubbles as mush as possible.

The picture is from Microsoft ClipArt


Chapter 45
sedoka (private party)

By Treischel


sedoka (private party)




belligerent bird,
wing wave warns wilted welcome,
protects pond's private party.

don't stop, sorry full
daffy duck diverts, delays,
male mallard makes many mates


Author Notes For the Contest prompt.

Private pond party, all others not welcome in bird language.

5-7-7 syllable count. two stanzas. Six lines.

The photograph is from the Author's collection.


Chapter 46
haiku (blue earth)

By Treischel

clear water
earth covered in blue
gives life birth

Author Notes Rain, snow, clear blue water

Lake Superior in winter

Author's photograph


Chapter 47
Woodland Wonders

By Treischel

Woodland Wonders
(A 5A Poem)



Wild Woodland Wonders
Humble Heavy Hearts
Breathtaking Beauty


Author Notes North Shore of Lake Superior

Capitalization intentional, to emphasize the alliteration.

This is a 5A poem.
The "5A" new format style was developed by Fanstorian DRG24.
*The 5A is composed of three lines:
Line 1 - 5 Syllables
Line 2 - 5 Syllables
Line 3 - 5 Syllables

All lines must have TOTAL alliteration. Lines can be chosen in any order.
The "5" stands for the five syllable count while the "A" stands for the Alliteration.

This photograph was taken by me at Tettegouche State Park in September 2011, Minnesota has 68 State Parks, seven state recreation areas, eight state waysides, and 22 state trails in the Minnesota state park system, totaling approximately 267,000 acres. This is one of them.


Chapter 48
Apple on a Tree

By Treischel


Apple on a Tree
( A Tic-tac-toe Poem)


 
Pick an Apple        | on a tree           | find one ripe
get nutritious treat |from low branch | for a kid
one tasty fruit         | juicy and red    | before it falls

 

Author Notes An Apple a day ......

This is a Tic-tac-toe poem. It is a format that I created. The rules are to create a poem where each line has three, three word phrases. The poem has three lines. Each three word phrase lines up in a Tic-tac-toe like matrix where the poem reads from every direction (up, down, across, diagonally, and backwards) in a poetic statement.
It is a good word/brain exercise.

I took this picture while on a walk in the woods. I found an apple tree growing wild. Good spot to capture deer or bear pictures.


Chapter 49
Battle Bruises

By Treischel


Black Battle Bruises
Accused And Abused
Victims Vilified


Author Notes Abuse is a terrible crime. We need to eradicate it.

Capitalization intentional.

This is a 5A Poem.
The "5A" new format style was developed by Fanstorian DRG24.
*The 5A is composed of three lines:
Line 1 - 5 Syllables
Line 2 - 5 Syllables
Line 3 - 5 Syllables

All lines must have TOTAL alliteration. Lines can be chosen in any order.
The "5" stands for the five syllable count while the "A" stands for the Alliteration.

This wonderfully expressive artwork is Not People Like Us by Jean A Cormier of FanArt Review.com. Thank you Jean.


Chapter 50
Lust or Love

By Treischel

Lust or Love
(A 5A Poem, see notes)




Loose lust lingers late
Love lasts longer, lest
Lessons leave loathing.

Author Notes You can get hurt.

The "5A" new format style was developed by Fanstorian DRG24.
*The 5A is composed of three lines:
Line 1 - 5 Syllables
Line 2 - 5 Syllables
Line 3 - 5 Syllables

All lines must have TOTAL alliteration. Lines can be chosen in any order.
The "5" stands for the five syllable count while the "A" stands for the Alliteration.

Many thanks with the wonderful artwork, Large Love by Angelheart on FanArtReview.com


Chapter 51
Pet Parade

By Treischel

Pet Parade
(A 5A poem)



Come colorful clowns
Playful pet parade
Dogs Dance Daintily

Author Notes Pet Parades are a pleasant summertime diversion.

This is a 5A poem.
The "5A" new format style was developed by Fanstorian DRG24.
*The 5A is composed of three lines:
Line 1 - 5 Syllables
Line 2 - 5 Syllables
Line 3 - 5 Syllables

All lines must have TOTAL alliteration. Lines can be chosen in any order.
The "5" stands for the five syllable count while the "A" stands for the Alliteration.

The picture is from Yahoo Images.


Chapter 52
Tornado

By Treischel


Tornado




Twisting Tornado
tragic tales and troubled times
Evil Wind that blows

Author Notes Oklahoma, my heart goes out to you.

Capitalization is intentional for impact

Image from Microsoft ClipArt


Chapter 53
A Quiet Place

By Treischel

A Quiet Place
(A Tanka Poem)



Take me to a place
Where the quiet waters flow,
To watch setting sun
In reflected color show,
While mated mallards drift by.

So pleasing to my eye,
Lovely landscape lullaby,
Painted by His hand
On the water and the sky.
What wonders could be more grand?

Author Notes I found it!

This poem has the form of a Tanka. It has the traditional 5-7-5-7-7 syllable count. I added some rhyme and punctuation, which are not traditional.

This is a third poem using the sunset I photographed on May 19, 2013 at Lake Phalen. One of several shots I took that evening.


Chapter 54
Wild Seeds

By Treischel

Wild Seeds
(A 5-7-5 Poem)



Wild flowers, wild seeds
grow wherever wind takes them
nurtured by nature


Author Notes The world is lovely wherever you look, especially when there are wild flowers to see of many sorts.

These are White Campion that I found while walking in a local park that is prairie and wetland. These flower draw into a bladder-like bud during the day, then spread their flowers at night. They attract moths and other nocturnal insects.

This photograph was taken by the author on June 24, 2013 while walking with my wife at Battle Creek regional park in Maplewood, Minnesota.


Chapter 55
A Corner Wall

By Treischel

A Corner Wall
(An Octogram)




Such beauty that you can't contain
Spills over wall.
In spreading green on stony grain,
It gently falls,
To add a touch of charming grace
Across the front of low wall face,
In pure delight, as leafage sprawl
Spills over wall.


A feeling that you can't explain,
When beauty calls.
Its composition mark remains
Stamped over all.
To keep another precious find
We store forever in our mind,
Like lovely colored camisoles,
Spills over wall.

Author Notes This is just a wall along side the grocery store in Woodbury, Minnesota. Civic merchant pride is evident as there are lovely flower displays all over the area. I was out capturing some of the summer delights with my camera. Here is one, and the poem it inspired.

This poem is an Octogram.
The Octogram is a style of poetry invented by Fanstorian Sally Yocom (S.Yocom). It consists of two stanzas of eight lines each, with a very specific syllable count and rhyme scheme.
Syllable count is 84848884, repeat on second stanza.
Rhyme scheme: aBabccbB ababddbB, where B repeats same text.
No more than 16 lines.

This photograph was taken by the author himself.


Chapter 56
Bursting Forth

By Treischel

Bursting Forth
(A Shadorma Poem)



Burst of Green
As new leaves come forth
Tinted hues
Earth renewed
Naked branches clothed again
Trees back in splendor



Author Notes I get excited when I see the new leaves bursting out of their buds and starting to form full grown leaves. The Promise of Spring is underway.

This poen is a Shadorma.
A Shadorma is a Spanish format of a non-rhyming poem with a fixed format of syllable count. The count must be: 3/5/3/3/7/5. With that count, it is Spanish cousin to the Japanese Haiku or Senryu with their 3/5/3 and 5/7/5 structures.
The format gives a lovely pattern of flow and spurts.

This photograph is the Author's own. It was taken in April 2012.


Chapter 57
Barbecue

By Treischel

Barbecue
(A Minute Poem)


Family picnic upon the hill
To eat their fill,
A shaded site,
Summer's delight!

Surrounded by some large oak trees
In gentle breeze,
Set coals alight.
Charcoal turns white.

The sights and sounds, they laugh and joke,
Barbecue smoke
Drifts to the heights.
Grilled hot dog bites.



Author Notes These are the things of summer.

This is a minute Poem
The minute poem consists of 60 syllables, hence the name.
There are three stanzas with syllable count of 8/4/4/4, with all lines in strict iambic meter. The rhyme scheme is simple couplets: aabb ccdd eeff.

This photograph was taken by the author of a family having a picnic on June 23, 2013, at Battle Creek Park in Maplewood, Minnesota.


Chapter 58
Holiday Rockets

By Treischel

Holiday Rockets
(A Whitney Poem)





Holiday
Shooting rockets
Flags unfurled
Bright blast away
Nighttime revel
Ignites dark world
Night patriotic display


Author Notes Fourth of July Rockets. Bottle Rockets.

This poem is a Whitney
A Whitney has a fixed syllable count of 3/4/3/4/3/4/7 in 7 lines.

Photograph was taken by the author in his front yard.


Chapter 59
Summer Camp

By Treischel

Summer Camp
(A Trequas Poem)





Little scamp,
Summer Camp,
Off they tramp
Down the ramp.

It's begun,
Off for fun
In the sun.
'Til they're done.

Miss the lad,
Not too bad!
Momma's glad,
Fun they've had.

Sunny day,
Kids away,
Hit the hay,
Parents play.


Author Notes The joys of Summer

This poem is a Trequas.
A Trequas Poem is a new poetic format created by FanStorian Jim Lorson, SR. It consists of sets of 4 lines (quatrains). Each quatrain has lines of only 3 syllables per line. There is a minimum of 3 quatrains. It may either rhyme or not.

The picture is from of Yahoo Images.


Chapter 60
Mother's Essence

By Treischel

Mother's Essence
(A Triolet Poem)



A mother's love is the essence
Of a cuddle and gentle smile,
As she's giving gentle guidance.
A mother's love is the essence,
As you seek her loving presence,
To snuggle in her arms a while.
A mother's love is the essence
Of a cuddle and gentle smile.


Author Notes To all Mothers, young and old

The artwork is from Microsoft ClipArt


Chapter 61
Heating Up

By Treischel


Things are heating up
it's started to really smoke
on barbeque grill

Author Notes Finally got to grill.

A 5-7-5 Poem
Syllable count 5/7/5
Minimal punctuation

Picture from Microsoft ClipArt


Chapter 62
These old Bones

By Treischel

These Old Bones



Oh how these old bones creak!
There's distinct possibility
Of declining agility.
I guess that's not unique.


Author Notes Went out golfing 18 holes in the heat. Can't hit the ball as far as I used to. The aches this morning, I think I need traction!

This is a single Quatrain with abba rhyming (enveloping). The syllable count is 6/8/8/6.

Thank you for the artwork, Aging together by camera68 of FanArt Review.com


Chapter 63
Creature Comfort

By Treischel


Creature Comfort
(A modified Respitto Poem)





A little green grasshopper rests
On a pretty Black-eyed Susan
It seems to have taken the best
Shelter from hoppity cruisin'

The yellow petal sheds some shade
On tiny creature from the glade
Off he jumped with his own power
As I bent to view this flower.



Author Notes A walk in the park with my grandson resulted in him spotting this flower and bug. The wildflower is a Black-eyed Susan. He got all excited and asked me to take its picture and write a poem. So here it is.

I wrote this poem is a Rispetto style, but played with it a bit. The Rispetto is a classic Italian form consisting of only 8 lines divided into two quatrains. The meter is iambic tetrameter: daDUMdaDUMdaDUMdaDUM. The distinguishing characteristic of this form is that the rhyme scheme changes from abab alternate-line rhyming in stanza one to ccdd couplet rhyming in the second.
I thought, as long as the rhyming changes, why not change and alternate the meter too, between iambic and trochee. So in Stanza 1 I have the meter set as: iamb/troch/iamb/troch. While in the second stanza I have: iamb/iamb/troch/troch. Now there's some alternation!

This photograph was taken by the author on July 11, 2013.


Chapter 64
Weekends

By Treischel


Weekends
(A 5-7-5 Poem)




Lazy Saturdays
Sunday mornings are divine
Wonderful Weekends


Author Notes Just sharing my thoughts this morning.

Picture is from Yahoo Images


Chapter 65
Waiting

By Treischel

Waiting
(Palindrome Poem)




I
Wait
Tic clock Tic
Back and forth
Forth and back
Tic tock clock tock tic
Slowly swings pendulum swings slowly
Tic tock clock tock tic
Back and forth
Forth and back
Tic clock Tic
Wait
I


Author Notes Sometimes it seems forever.

This poem is a Palindrome. A palindrome is a word (or sentence) that reads the same backwards as forward. So "Madam" is a palindrome.
For a palindrome poem you incorporate it into your poem but do so with the sentences.

The picture is from Yahoo Images.


Chapter 66
Hear Ye!

By Treischel




Hear Ye!
Let all of England's church bells ring!
Let chorus voices loudly sing!
The Windsors begat a future King,
New Royalty!
National Glee!
The news brings joy across the land,
As regal Prince and Princess Planned.
Another George! How simply grand!
Wonderful thing,
Such news to bring!
Hear Ye!


Author Notes Blessed Event in England.

A 12 Line Exhortation is a poem with 12 lines, starting and ending with a 2 syllable line that caries an exhortation, like; Get up!, Move on! Go jump! The whole syllable structure is; 2/8/8/8/4/4/8/8/8/4/4/2.
There is also a fixed rhyme scheme of: AbbbaacccddA, where the capital letters are repeated lines.


The picture is from Microsoft ClipArt.


Chapter 69
Blisters and Bandaids

By Treischel

Blisters and Bandaids
(ABCB Rhyme)




Blisters and bandaids
On bare battered feet
From bushes and brambles
On trail obsolete
In woods where tangles
Of thorns are repleat
To conspire calamity
As feet meet defeat.


Author Notes Just a poem

Picture from Yahoo Images


Chapter 70
Ray Gun

By Treischel


Gleam
Is ready on the beam
Scream

Author Notes Watch out for Aliens carrying weapons. When the light goes on, the jig is up.

A 1-6-1 poem.
Three lines all lines must rhyme.
Line 1: 1 syllable
Line 2: 6 syllables
Line 3: 1 Syllables

Picture from Microsoft ClipArt.


Chapter 71
Blowing Seeds

By Treischel




Life will bloom
And carry its seeds

Where wind blows
New life will grow

Author Notes Seed pods from a thistle. This poem was inspired by the picture, plus a recent review of a poem by Robina1978, My Boiling Brain.

This is a Septolet. The septolet has fourteen words. It is broken between two stanzas that make up the fourteen words. Each stanza can have seven words each but that is not a requirement. Both stanzas deal with the same thought and create a picture.

This photograph was taken by the author.


Chapter 72
Breakfast

By Treischel


Breakfast
(4/3 Poem)




Bread and Butter
Toast and Jam
Eggs and Bacon
Helping of ham


I'm Hungry!

Author Notes Light stuff

Picture from Microsoft ClipArt


Chapter 73
Teensy Fish

By Treischel

Teensy Fish
(A 3-5-3 Poem)





Got his wish
Grandson caught a fish
Great finish

Author Notes Went fishing with my Grandson the other day. I was catching little Sunfish on my fly rod, but he wasn't catching anything. He was using corn on line with bobber. He was grousing about it. Finally he caught a teensy smallmouth bass. That made him happy!

The picture taken with my IPhone.


Chapter 74
Mullein Musings

By Treischel

Mullein Musings
(Minute Poem with closing Tercet and Exclamation)





A searching damselfly came by
Gave plant the eye
Flew right to it
A 'Lil Bluet

The Flower Common Mullein
Its blooms began
Attracted fly
The hue of Sky

This wildflower's flannel-like leaf
Gave foot relief
First settlers choose
To use in shoes



Did torches get lit when stalks dry?
Or ladies rub blush with a sigh?
'Twas surely not the Damselfly!

Oh My!



Author Notes This poem will be another of my wildflower series.

This large green wildflower, that almost looks like a corn stalk, is actually a Common Mullein. You think its a mundane plant, but actually, it is quite interesting. This wildflower (Verabscum Thapsus) is also known as the Flannel Plant. In its first year of maturity, it grows low to the ground in a spread of large fuzzy leaves that look like rabbit ears. Thus the name, Flannel Plant. In the second year, it grows into a large stalk as shown here. Early American settlers used to stuff the fluffy leaves into their shoes for padding and insulation. The Ancient Romans used to dip the dried stalks in animal grease and use the slow burn for torches. During the Middle Ages, ladies would rub the leaves on their cheeks, where the skin irritation would give them a blush for a few days. Then of course, when it flowers, as this one is just starting to do, it attracts bees and other insects such as dragonflies, damselflies and butterflies. So, you see, it is quite interesting.
The damselfly shown is known as a Common Bluet (Enallagma Civlle). They have lovely shades of turquoise blue and black. I caught this one in flight.

This poem is a Minute Poem that I closed with a 3 line tercet and final exclamation, just to give it some more color.
The Minute Poem is a poem that follows the "8,4,4,4" syllable count structure. It usually has 3 stanzas that are exactly the same.
So: 8,4,4,4; 8,4,4,4; 8,4,4,4 syllables. The tercet was also 8 syllables, Exclamation 2 syllables.

A traditional Minute Poem has 12 lines total. It has 60 syllables. It is written in a strict iambic meter. The rhyme scheme is as follows: aabb, ccdd, eeff.
The tercet was Mono-rhymed as: aaa
Exclamation:a
So this total poem's rhyme scheme was: aabb ccdd eeff aaa a.

This photograph was taken by the author himself in August, 2013 at Battle Creek Park in St. Paul, Minnesota.


Chapter 75
Euphoria

By Treischel

Euphoria
(A Freud Poem)



Euphoric
Bliss with lift
Brings you high

From a kiss
Or a sight
Day or night

You're in for
The best Joy
Of your life


Author Notes Euphoria is the highest state mind.

This poem is a Freud Poem.
A "Freud" was developed by Fanstorian, 'ann marie mazz'.
The rules are:
Three syllables per line
Three lines per stanzas
Three stanza limit
Rhyming is optional
The theme must contain a state of mind.

This picture is from Yahoo Images


Chapter 76
Blue Clematis

By Treischel

Blue Clematis
(A 3X Poem)



This blue flower is a climbing vine.
The Blue Clematis clings by vine,
On walls and fences you'll find this vine
In color that's divine.

Its deep blue hue matches the sky,
As it climbs so high reaching for sky.
Off the ground, this guy tries to catch sky,
At it will try and try.

Species went from China to Japan.
To Europe it was brought from Japan,
So, it's considered a gift from Japan.
China's where it began.

As the days roll by,
And we tread on by,
The walls and fences as passers by,
A Blue Clematis may catch your eye.


Author Notes I want over to Lake Harriet in Minneapolis the other day. It has a fabulous Rose Garden there. These Clematis were hanging on the entry fence. According to Wikipedia, Clematis (KLEma-tis) is a genus of about 300 species within the buttercup family. They are mainly of Chinese and Japanese origin. Most species are known as Clematis in English, while some are also known as Traveler's Joy, a name invented for the sole British native. It is composed of mostly vigorous, woody, climbing vines, so finding it on the fence is pretty typical. Clematis species are mainly found throughout the temperate regions of the northern hemisphere, rarely in the tropics. Clematis leaves are food for the caterpillars of some Butterfly species, including the Willow Beauty. The wild Clematis species native to China made their way into Japanese gardens by the 17th century. Japanese garden selections were the first exotic clematises to reach European gardens, in the 18th century, long before the Chinese species were identified at the end of the 19th century. The climbing varieties are valued for their ability to scramble up walls, fences and other structures, and also to grow through other plants, such as shrubs and trees. Some can be trained along the ground to provide cover. Because of their adaptability and masses of spectacular flowers, Clematis are very popular.

This poem is a 3X Poem. This new "3x" format was developed by Fanstorian PF aka Pipersfancy. It has a fixed rhyme scheme of unique repeating rhymes. Although not typical, it makes for an intriguing display.
The end rhyme words of the 1st three lines are the same (Therefore the term, 3x)
The 4th line has to rhyme but is not identical, making each stanza mono-rhyme.
Minimum four stanzas

This photograph was taken by the author himself.


Chapter 77
Mayan Mistake (3-5-3 Poem)

By Treischel

Mayan fool
dead calendar tool
broke the rule

out of ink
brought world to the brink
needless stink

we're not dead
forget Mayan dread
stay in bed

Author Notes Need to get that in while still December

Thank you for Time is a river by donkeyoatey on FanArtReview.com


Chapter 79
haiku (burning)

By Treischel

haiku (burning)
6-3-6 Format






two fifty wooded miles
up in smoke
as wildlife runs or dies

Author Notes 250 miles of woodland in California, near Yosemite National Park, has burned. 3,700 firefighters are battling to contain it and protect towns and property. My thoughts here are with the wildlife.

The Haiku, as a three line poem about nature, must contain less than 17 syllables. This one has 15.

This artwork is from Microsoft ClipArt.


Chapter 80
Golf

By Treischel

Golf
(A Pantoum)




He cleanly strokes the small white orb,
With mighty swing applied so well.
Imparting power balls absorb,
In curving arc, it flew and fell.

With mighty swing applied so well,
Pure physics' actions can be seen.
In curving arc, it flew and fell,
To land so softly toward the green.

Pure physics' actions can be seen,
Player properly lines it up,
To land so softly on the green,
And roll it smoothly towards the cup.

Player properly lines it up,
He cleanly strokes the small white orb,
And rolls it smoothly towards the cup,
Imparting power balls absorb.


WOW! THAT'S A PAR!



Author Notes I like to Golf. A typical hole in golf is a Par 4. The first stanza represents the driver shot off the tee box. The second stanza represents a fairway shot towards the green. The third stanza represents the chip shot onto the green, while the fourth is the putt into the cup (hole).

This Poem is a Pantoum.
A pantoum is a poem that is made up of quatrains. In a pantoum the second and fourth lines of the previous stanza are repeated as the first and third lines of the next stanza. That establishes a rhyme scheme as follows:
A1,B1,A2,B2 B1,C1,B2,C2 C1,D1,C2,D2 D1,A1,D2,A2.
I slightly modified some repeated lines for theme integrity. When writing this format, then, you need to be cognizant of the impact of two lines as you go. The A1 and A2 lines don't need to repeat at the end, but I chose to do so. You could have an E1 and E2 instead and keep going indefinitely.

The picture is from Microsoft ClipArt


Chapter 81
Morning Kiss

By Treischel

Morning Kiss
(A 5-7-5 Poem)





Woke up with a kiss
If each day would be like this
I'd be filled with bliss

Author Notes It must be a dream

The picture is from Yahoo Images


Chapter 82
Across the Floor

By Treischel

Across the Floor
(A Tango Poem)




Hand on shoulder
Foreheads touch
Eyeball to eyeball
They tightly clutch
And then, they Tango to that Latin beat

Across the floor
As one, embraced
Alternating steps
As heartbeats race
And dance, bodies exuding Latin heat

A florid dip
Coquettish push
Then fiery twirls
A rapid rush
Just as suddenly, Tango is complete

Author Notes AH Ha!

This poem is a Tango.
A tango is a poem of almost any format that conveys the essence of the dance. The poem must contain the word Tango within its verse.

The artwork is from Microsoft ClipArt


Chapter 83
Como Conservatory

By Treischel

Como Conservatory
(A Minute Poem)



At Como Conservatory
Nature's glory
Within and out
Beauty's about

Surrounding parkland greets the eye
Brings forth a sigh
Color galore
Lets spirits soar

A tiny taste of what's inside
Where treasures hide
Cherished jewel
Where colors rule

Author Notes The Como Park Conservatory, named after Marjorie McNeeley, is a true gem of St. Paul. The grounds around it contain several lovely garden spots. I took this photograph from across the street. Around it are some floating gardens. Inside are several beautiful rooms of ferns and flowers that include fountains and sunken gardens.

This poem is a Minute Poem.
The Minute Poem is a poem that follows the "8,4,4,4" syllable count structure. It usually has 3 stanzas that are exactly the same. So: 8,4,4,4; 8,4,4,4; 8,4,4,4 syllables.
A traditional Minute Poem has 12 lines total. It has 60 syllables(Thus, the Minute). It is written in a strict iambic meter. I couldn't quite get it there. This one is tetrameter on the 8 count lines.
The usual rhyme scheme is as follows: aabb, ccdd, eeff.

The picture was taken by the author himself.


Chapter 84
Today?

By Treischel



The question that I own under the dome,
Is today the day I may bring her home?

Author Notes I find out soon.

Picture from Bing Images


Chapter 86
I Wonder

By Treischel

I Wonder
(Couplet Query)





Is this statue a "Salute to a Brute",
Or truly is it a sincere tribute?


Author Notes I saw this statue to a famous Gorilla that lived at the Como Zoo for years. It died and a statue was made for it. His name was Don. The plaque reads, "Portrait of Don. Sculpted and donated by Betty Severt. 1982"

This poem is a Couplet Query.
This format was created by the author using a simple rhymed couplet format. It asks a question that leaves the answer up to the reader to decide.
Couplet Query: two lines that ask a rhetorical question, since the answer is within the poem itself.
Syllable count is open, used 10 for this poem. Must end rhyme. Two lines only.

This photograph was taken by the author himself.


Chapter 87
Leaf Pile Fun

By Treischel

Leaf Pile Fun
(A Child Four Poem)







Leaves,
When they are gathered into large piles,
The chance for play achieves
Big smiles.

Kids
Will dive inside the spongy middle.
Makes their smiling eyelids
Giggle.

Joy
Was soon spontaneously carried.
Lots of leaves have this boy
Buried.

Then
When disappearing before our eyes,
His head pops out again.
Surprise!



Author Notes Jumping into a pile of leaves is great fun for kids. This is my grandson Jeremy in October 2011.

This poem is a Child Four Poem.
The Child Four format was created by ann marie mazz.
It consists of four line stanzas with a 1-9-6-2 syllable count. Rhyming is optional. There is no stanza limit.
I rhymed this one in an abab scheme.
This photograph was taken by the author himself.


Chapter 88
Turkey Trot

By Treischel

Turkey Trot



The turkey trots across the park,
Its feathers bronze and brown.
Mottled neck
To peck and peck,
It gobbled seed,
Then gobbled loud.

Gobble! Gobble!

Author Notes In the long shadows of the afternoon, I spotted a wild turkey. You can tell this one is a male by that long feather hanging from its chest.

This photograph is one of mine, taken a few blocks from my house.


Chapter 89
Upward

By Treischel

Upward
(12 Line Exortation)



Upward!
Like the egrit soars on the wind,
As tethered souls spirit's unpinned,
When the wheels of fortune are spinned,
Moving forward,
Always upward,
Take complete charge of coming day.
As the tears and fears fall away,
The fogs are all cleared from yesterday.
Don't need to stop!
Go to the top!
Upward!

Author Notes For those recovering or who need a lift.

This poem is a 12 Line Exortation.
I researched poetry types with 12 Lines to see what they are called. I found a group of poems called 12 Lines. But they are basically unstructured. I wanted some specific structure. I wanted a poem with 3 consecutive lines of rhyme, that played off 8/4/2 syllable counts and and was positive in spirit. so I created this format and call it 12 Line Exhortation. I don't think this format previously exists, as far as I know. let me know if otherwise. Here are the rules.
A 12 Line Exhortation is a poem with 12 lines, starting and ending with a 2 syllabe line that caries an exhortation, like; Get up!, Move on! Go jump! The whole syllable structure is; 2/8/8/8/4/4/8/8/8/4/4/2.
There is also a fixed rhyme scheme of: AbbbaacccddA, where the capital leters are repeated lines.

The photograph is one of a Great White Egret in flight, taken by the author in July 2012 at Battle Creek park in Maplewood, Minnesota.


Chapter 90
Another Day Done

By Treischel

Another Day Done
(An Eleven77 Poem)




A Setting Sun
As each evening comes
Goes down

All cars once parked
By pavilion's path
Are gone

The fallen leaves
Reveal limbs stretched to
The sky

As little breeze
Through the barren trees
Moves on

Another day
That has slipped away
Is done

The time of day
Darkened sky gives out
A sigh

As night draws nigh
Setting sun says last
Goodbye

Author Notes The sun set on another day at the picnic pavilion.

This poem is an Eleven77 which is a poem form created by an Australian Fanstorian poet: GarthL

It consists of seven stanzas each with a specific syllable count of 4, 5, 2. Last word of successive stanzas rhyme, to create an overall rhyme scheme with each other.

Each stanza thereby has 11 syllables across 7 stanzas equaling to 77 syllables in total, hence an Eleven77.

This photograph was taken by the author at Mounds Park in St. Paul, Minnesota in May, 2011.


Chapter 91
Wayward Wind

By Treischel

Wayward Wind
(A 5A Poem)





When wayward wind whips,
watch weeping willows
wave with wild welcome.


Author Notes Wind whips a willow at the park.

This poem is a 5A created by Fanstorian DRG24: 3 lines, 5 syllables each, complete alliteration in every line.

This photograph was taken by the author himself.


Chapter 92
Blessed by Beauty

By Treischel

Blessed by Beauty
(Reversed Rhyming Quatrains)



Fine flowers festoon,
And give off perfume,
When one walks the fine floral trail,
So blessed by bright beauty's detail.

Can be no travail,
Where colors unveil,
The essence of joy they assume
As they show off summer's costume.


Author Notes This scene is along the path at Como Park that leads to the Frog Pond.

This is just a format I envisioned. I'm not aware of any formal format like this one. It consists of two Quatrains that reverse their rhyme scheme from aabb to bbaa. The syllable count I chose was 5/5/8/8 for each.

This photograph was taken by the author himself at Como Park in St. Paul, Minnesota.


Chapter 94
Floating Garden Tableau

By Treischel

Floating Garden Tableau
(A Tableau Poem)



When plants are afloat,
Reflections accrue,
Mirrors loveliness.
Beauty so remote,
Water colors too,
Of reds, greens, and blues.

Author Notes Floating Garden outside the Como Park Conservatory

This poem is a Tableau.
The Tableau, a poetry form created by Emily Romano in October of 2008, consists of one or more verses, each having six lines. Each line should have five beats. There is no set rhyme scheme, although rhyme may be present. The title should contain the word tableau. The word tableau means picture or representation, the poem should reflect this. A picture should come to mind as the poem is read.

This photograph was taken by the author himself.


Chapter 96
Bonzai Tree

By Treischel

Bonzai Tree
(A Whitney Poem)




Bonzai tree
Silent beauty
Pretty pose
Regal aura
Natural
Esthetic prose
Aristocrat of flora


Author Notes This is a photo of a Bonzai tree, taken at the Como Park Conservatory in the Ordway collection. Bonsai are plantings in a tray, from bon, a tray or low-sided pot and sai, a planting or plantings. It is a Japanese art form using miniature trees grown in containers which dates back over a thousand years, and has its own aesthetics and terminology. The purposes of bonsai are primarily contemplation (for the viewer) and the pleasant exercise of effort and ingenuity (for the grower).
From about the year 970 comes the first lengthy work of fiction in Japanese,(The Tale of the Hollow Tree), which includes this passage: "A tree that is left growing in its natural state is a crude thing. It is only when it is kept close to human beings who fashion it with loving care that its shape and style acquire the ability to move one." The idea, therefore, was already established by this time that natural beauty becomes true beauty only when modified in accordance with a human ideal." Bonsai dating to the 17th century have survived to the present. One of the oldest-known living bonsai trees, considered one of the National Treasures of Japan, is in the Tokyo Imperial Palace collection. A five-needle pine thought to be at least 500 years old and was first trained as a bonsai by, at latest, the year 1610. Source: Wikipedia.

This Poem is a Whitney.
Whitney Created by Betty Ann Whitney, this seven-line verse based on Japanese patterns with a fixed syllable format that contains 3, 4, 3, 4, 3, 4, 7 syllables respectively. No rhyme scheme is required, but may be incorporated if desired.

This photograph was taken by the author


Chapter 97
Cup of Bitterness

By Treischel

Cup of Bitterness
(Couplet Query)




When you sup from the cup of bitterness and woe,
Then the question remains, from there, where do you go?



Author Notes The answer in within you.

This is a Couplet Query.
Query: two lines that ask a rhetorical question, since the answer is within the poem itself.
Syllable count is open, used 12. Must end rhyme. Two lines only.

Picture courtesy of Yahoo Images


Chapter 98
Showing Colors

By Treischel

Blowing in the wind
colors show
in grains and Glory

Author Notes This picture inspired this poem

Flying the flag is also known as "Showing the colors".
The nickname for the flag of the USA is "Old Glory".

This poem is a Lune.
The Lune is also known as the American Haiku. It was first created by the poet Robert Kelly and was a result of Kelly's frustration with English haiku. After much experimentation, he settled on a 13-syllable, self-contained poem that has 5 syllables in the first line, 3 syllables in the second line and 5 syllable in the final line.

Unlike haiku, there are no other rules. No need for a cutting word. Rhymes are fine; subject matter is open. While there are less syllables to use, this form has a little more freedom.

The photograph was taken by the author on the Valley Creek Bridge going over I494 in Woodbury, MN.


Chapter 99
haiku (cultured Path)

By Treischel

haiku (cultured path)
(3-5-3 Poem)



cultured path
goes around the pond
pure delight

Author Notes Entrance to the Japanese Garden at Como Park

Picture taken by the Author


Chapter 100
Scrabble Love

By Treischel

Scrabble Love
(A Scrabble Poem)




Scrabble is their favorite game.
And so he started with her name.
"Natasha" was first on the board,
Happy with the points that he scored.

Her tiles spelled his occupation,
Which she placed down with elation,
As "Photographer" was his trade.
Contented with the points she made.

She's in his eyes a shining "Star",
Placed on her name in down crossbar,
Bringing a sparkle to her eye,
As she focused on her next try.

She managed the word "Light",
Spurred by the twinkle of the night.
Laid it on the end of his "Job",
As his beating heart starts to throb.

Tenderly touched by the "Magic",
That drove the letters that he'd pick,
He found an available letter "A"
That quickly let him make that play.

Her next move took it to the end,
As both began to comprehend.
They gave the board a parting shove,
When she declared she was in "Love".

It would have been a crying shame,
Had they not started with that game.



Author Notes Even a game can light the spark. Follow along as the words are placed on the board.

There may be some double meanings in places here.

This is a Scrabble Poem. This format was created by Fanstorian, Indie Screet. The rules are simple. Make a poem of any style or format that tells a story related to the words on a Scrabble Board. Try one. It's fun!

This picture is form Yahoo images.


Chapter 101
Silver Vette

By Treischel

Silver Vette
(A Lunatika about a Corvette)





Silver Vette
The best you can get
Looks like Jet
Can't afford one yet
Much to my regret


-<>-

Sting Ray Set
(La Lunatika About a 63 Corvette)




For a solid bet
Can't forget
Sixty Three Corvette
Sting Ray set
Nice asset


Author Notes Went to a car show last fall. Coveted a Corvette.

This poem is a Lunatika followed by a La Lunatika.
Lunatika, A poetic style that was created by Sunnilicious. Lunatika is an American Tanka. It is derived from the Japanese Tanka and Americcan Lune. Lunatika means an American Lune extended into an American Tanka. This tighter form of the traditional Tanka style is more visual as it allows short poetic narratives to be written. The Lunatika Poem can be written about any subject matter. It can have rhymes anywhere or be unrhymed. Centered or aligned. Alliteration allowed too. Punctuation is optional and left to the writer's discretion.
The syllable count requirements are 3/5/3/5/5. The title would always say Lunatika and include the subject of the poem.
La Lunatika turns the format inside out as: 5/3/5/3/3

This photograph was taken by the author in September, 2012.


Chapter 102
Lunatika Chevy

By Treischel




White and Blue
Fifty Six Chevy
Hanging Dice
White-wall tires too
Car looks really nice

Fun to own
It's loaded with chrome
Stands alone
Classy in two-tone
Want to take one home

Happy Days!
Really impress her
Winning ways
At drive-in diner
There's nothing finer


Author Notes Remember those days?


Photograph by the author from the fall car show in 2012


Chapter 103
Goodbye

By Treischel


To her gentle spirit we say - goodbye!
Her quiet voice of reason, now goodbye.

Oh,Cheyewenny, you will be so missed!
No comfort can exist, without goodbye!

We pray your soul will fly into the sky!
So hard for those behind to say goodbye.

You're now reunited with life's true love,
Up above, since you said that sad goodbye.

No more, those lonely nights in pain and tears,
Since you two dears, have said your goodbyes.

As your soul is settled, we are bereft.
Still, you've left written words as our goodbye.

So many lovely words you've left behind,
We find a legacy as your goodbye.

As yet your poetry echoes in shadows
Of our minds, as we wish a last goodbye.

Those moving words you offered us will last,
Steadfast , on pages as a past goodbye.

Confident you're now under heaven's spell,
We say to you farewell, goodbye, goodbye.

Author Notes With Tears and Respect

Took this picture from her profile Page


Chapter 104
Changing Clouds and Leaves

By Treischel

Changing Clouds and Leaves
(An Interlinked Rubiyat)




I watch the changing clouds go drifting by
In shifting pattern puffs that fill the sky.
So many floating thoughts that it achieves,
I could become lost and not even try.

I lay back to watch through Autumn's leaves,
And often ponder, when my mind perceives,
A oneness with the squirrels and birds.
Awareness that life's pattern interweaves.

A feeling hard to state in simple words.
I need to separate it all in thirds.
Because it's not divisible by two,
And wouldn't make much sense then afterwards.

And so I look and stare into the blue,
Each moment morphing into something new.
I marvel at the things that catch my eye
And watch the changing clouds go drifting through.


Author Notes Floating thoughts.

This poem is an Interlinked Rubiyat.
It takes on all the attributes of a Rubiyat written in iambic pentameter. In this Persian form of poetry is a series of rhymed quatrains. In each quatrain, all lines rhyme except the third, leading to this pattern:
aaba.
An "Interlocking Rubiyat" is a Rubiyat where the subsequent stanza rhymes its 1st, 2nd, and 4th lines with the sound at the end of the 3rd line in the stanza before it. In this form, the 3rd line of the final stanza is also rhymed with the 3 rhymed lines in the first stanza.
This leads to a form like this example with three stanzas; note that the Rubiyat is allowed an unlimited number of stanzas, so extend the pattern as needed:
aaba bbcb ccdc ddad
I also made a modification by paraphrasing the first line in the last line.

This photograph was taken be the author himself.


Chapter 105
Hold Crutch!

By Treischel



Hold Crutch!
Please supply my true love's support
To gain all healing's best resort.
So, soon she may again cavort
On healthy legs,
This husband begs.
While cradled under straining arms,
Help her recover from her harms.
Let her regain her healthy charms.
Where strength may lack,
Support her back.
Hold Crutch!


Author Notes My wife is on crutches for 3 weeks after her back surgery.

This Poem is a 12 Line Exhortation.
A 12 Line Exhortation is a format this author created. I researched poetry types with 12 Lines to see what they are called. I found a group of poems called 12 Lines. But they are basically unstructured. I wanted some specific structure. I wanted a poem with 3 consecutive lines of rhyme, that played off 8/4/2 syllable counts and was positive in spirit. So I created this format and called it 12 Line Exhortation. Here are the rules.

A 12 Line Exhortation is a poem with 12 lines, starting and ending with a 2 syllable line that caries an exhortation, like; Get up!, Move on! Go jump! The whole syllable structure is; 2/8/8/8/4/4/8/8/8/4/4/2. There is also a fixed rhyme scheme of: AbbbaacccddA, where the capital letters are repeated lines.

This picture is courtesy of Bing ClipArt Images.


Chapter 106
Vegas Treasures

By Treischel

Vegas Treasures
(A Cinquain Poem)






Vegas
holds more treasures
than those gambling dens.
You'll find true beauty resident
outside.


Author Notes I find walking around outside at Las Vegas cheaper and more rewarding than inside. Especially when I leave home in Minnesota at 10 degrees with snow on the ground and land at 70 degrees with palm trees.

This poem is a Cinquain.
A Cinquain is written using a pattern. "Cinq" [pronounced SINK] is French for the number 5. This type of poem only has five lines. Each line follows a specific pattern.
There are many ways to write this type of poetry. The traditional Cinquain, as developed by Adelaide Crapsey, has five lines and a strict structure based on syllable count.
Line 1: Two syllables
Line 2: Four syllables
Line 3: Six syllables
Line 4: Eight syllables
Line 5: Two syllables

This photograph was taken by the author at Las Vegas in 2011.


Chapter 107
My City at Night

By Treischel

My City at Night
(A Rondeau Poem)




My city at night shines like a jewel
That sparkles and glows as a general rule.
Its bridges and buildings stream with light
That cast images off the river at night,
As a reflecting pool.

Like a blithering fool,
I think it looks cool,
When I observe the sight
My city at night.

The glow that shows in each vestibule,
That gleams and beams form each edifice spicule
Adds its glimmer to the evening bright,
While the water-shed ribbons of gold delight
Blend together so well,
My city at night.



Author Notes The City of St. Paul, Minnesota at night. The river in the foreground with the Highway lights reflected on the Mississippi River. The First National Bank building is shown with the Large 1 lit up.

Spicule - A spike or staff, as on tops of buildings. Spikes of lighted gas that spew from the sun, also.

This poem is a Rondeau.
A Rondeau is a fixed form of poetry. It is often used in light or witty poems. It often has fifteen octo - or decasyllabic lines with three stanzas. It usually only has two rhymes (a & b) used in the poem. A word or words from the first part of the first line are used as a refrain ending the second and third stanzas.

The rhyme scheme, then, is;
aabba aabR aabbaR.
The format can carry any type of meter or syllable count, as long as it follows a fixed pattern. For this poem, I chose a syllable count of:
9/11/9/11/6 6/5/6/5 9/11/9/11/6/5

This night photograph was taken by the author himself.


Chapter 108
Crystalline Snow

By Treischel

Crystalline Snow
(A Child Four, 1962 Poem)




Bright
Crystalline sunshine upon snow flocked trees
Locked in seasonal freeze
Fine sight

Swell
Swirling snow puffs on bending pine boughs
Cast sunshine that endows
Sparkle

Clads
The earth in a blanket of fashions
Nature's decorations
God adds


Author Notes The Creator has His own way of decoration the trees for the season.

This poem is a Child Four.
This poem is a new style poem the Ritchie, 9999pool introduced us to. This Child Four or "1962" format developed by Fanstorian Ann aka ann marie mazz. syllable count of 1 9 6 2
No stanza limit
rhyming is optional

For this poem I wrote 3 stanzas with an abba rhyme scheme

This photograph was taken by the author himself.


Chapter 109
Twighlight Toasting

By Treischel

Twilight Toasting
(A Whitney Poem)




Dance and play
The day away
Cherubs sing
As angels may
Wine tasting
Twilight toasting
Dusk's revelries underway



Author Notes As the sun goes down, after a day of play, the cherubs gather to toast the sunset.

This poem is a Whitney.
A Whitney has a fixed syllable count of 3/4/3/4/3/4/7 in 7 lines.
There is no required rhyme scheme, but I added one of:
aababba.

This photograph was taken by the author himself at the Lake Harriet Rose Garden of Minneapolis in August, 2013.


Chapter 110
When Waters Dance

By Treischel

When Waters Dance
(An Octogram)





There is pure magic in the air,
When waters dance.
An artist put a fountain there.
It isn't chance!
Within the garden by the lake,
Along the path that you might take,
There lies a pool that speaks romance,
When waters dance.

Enclosed by ring of flowers faire,
It will entrance.
The Center rising with a flair,
A simple glance
Will see the rising ripples flash,
Then throw the drops that make a splash
Upon a pond where waves will prance,
When waters dance.

Author Notes Water simply lifting from the center of a pool and cascading down in a splash of waves, makes a walk through this garden very pleasant. It's located in an alcove between buildings of an apartment complex in downtown St. Paul.

This poem is an Octogram.
The Octogram is a style of poetry invented by Fanstorian Sally Yocom (S.Yocom). It consists of two stanzas of eight lines each, with a very specific syllable count and rhyme scheme.
Syllable count is 84848884, repeat on second stanza.
Rhyme scheme: aBabccbB ababddbB, where B repeats same text repeated.
No more than 16 lines.

This photograph was taken by the author himself at the Upper Landing Apartment Complex in St. Paul in June, 2012.


Chapter 111
Ski Lodge

By Treischel


Snow
descends.
Time extends
seasons we extoll.
Those holiday weekends
call forth the adventurous soul,
while wild winter excitement takes control,
couples decide to which ski resort they will go.
Then after day shushing slopes, the last goal,
to get warmed by white glowing coal
Which the lodge fireplace sends.
While storm clouds toll
Weather's ends,
cold winds
blow.

Author Notes The season is almost upon us. Winter has is delights.

This poem is a Diatelle.
A Diatelle has a set syllable count and a set rhyme.

The syllable count is:
1-2-3-4-6-8-10-12-10-8-6-4-3-2-1,
The rhyme scheme is:
abbcbccaccbcbba.

It is usually displayed centered.

This picture is courtesy of Yahoo Images.


Chapter 112
Pink Rose

By Treischel

Pink Rose
(A Cameo Poem)






Pink rose
Soft pastel petals
Delicate curled edges caress
In layers
A core with sweet scented center
Delights the nose and enchants
The eye


Author Notes Lush layers with sweet scent in a dark pastel pink. It takes my breath away.

I had to work hard to write a poem that doesn't rhyme.
This poem is a Cameo.
The cameo is a fixed form style of poetry with seven lines varying in syllabic length. It is one of the most simple ways of writing a poem and is frequently assigned in classrooms. It varies only in syllable count. The form is a heptastich (epta Greek; seven) or seven line verse and is unrhymed. The Cameo Poem is written in a strictly counted syllables per line; no rhymes are used.


line 1 = 2 syllables;
line 2 = 5;
line 3 = 8;
line 4 = 3;
line 5 = 8;
line 6 = 7;
line 7 = 2 syllables

This picture was taken by the author himself at the Como Park Conservatory in St. Paul, Minnesota.


Chapter 113
I Wonder If

By Treischel



I Wonder If
(An If-Then Poem)




If I were a honeybee, to flowers drawn,
Then I'd leave to hunt pollen at dawn.

If I were a Husky dog, born and bred,
Then I'd yearn to pull first at the front of the sled.

If I were an Eagle that soared high in the sky,
Then I'd circle and dive, when I saw dinner come by.

If I were a butterfly, so colorful and bright,
Then I'd search for a flower on which to alight.

If I were a cow that chews cud and says "Moo",
Then I'd be found on a farm, not in a zoo.

If I were a tiny, cute little mouse,
Then I might be looking for food, inside of your house.

If I were a bear with a coat of black hair,
Then in winter you'd find me asleep in my lair.

If I were a duck with a bill for a mouth,
Then I'd quack really loud, as I was flying South.

If, I wonder, all of that stuff is true,
Then what does it say about me and you?

Author Notes Don't you wonder?

This is an If-Then poem. Rhyming couplets of varying syllable counts, where the first line starts with IF, and the second starts with THEN. The theme in each stanza must relate to the IF proposition. All the statements must carry an overall theme.

This picture came from Yahoo Images


Chapter 114
I See an Eagle

By Treischel

I See an Eagle Fly
(A Paradelle Poem)





See the Eagle soar!
See the Eagle soar!
It owns the sky!
It owns the sky!
When I see the Eagle soar,
To own the sky is key.

My spirit flies!
My spirit flies!
Set it free!
Set it Free!
Because, when my spirit flies,
I set it free for Thee.

If I could fly,
If I could fly,
I'd climb to the heights.
I'd climb to the heights.
If I could fly to the heights,
The wonders I would see.

Then, when I see an Eagle fly,
I think, to own the sky is key.
I know, if I could fly to the heights,
I'd marvel at the wonders I would see.
That's because, when my spirit flies,
I set it free for Thee.


Author Notes Flights of fancy. Don't you ever wish you could fly like an Eagle?

This poem is a Paradelle.
I was introduced to this format this morning by Fanstorian Sunnilicious, in her poem, The Jewel Box.
Paradelle is a French from of poetry. It is considered difficult to write. It is comprised of 4 stanzas. The format is as follows:
Stanza 1, 2 and 3 - line 1 & 2 identical, line 3 & 4 identical, lines 5 & 6 are a saying made up of all the words in lines 1 & 3.
Stanza 4 - Use all the words in lines 1 & 3 from stanza 1,2,3 to make a full saying to sum up the poem in 6 lines.

This photograph was taken by the author at Fort Snelling State Park along the Mississippi River bottoms.


Chapter 115
God's House

By Treischel

God's House
(A Clarity Pyramid)





Church
God's House
Prayer in stone

Belief in accord
Where we are not alone
Where we sing and praise the Lord

Church - peace known and faith is grown there.



Author Notes This church, Gloria Dei, is located in Duluth,Minnesota.

This is a Clarity Pyramid.
A Clarity Pyramid is a poem consisting of two triplets and a single line (7 lines in all). Syllable count 1/2/3 5/6/7 8. The first three lines use defining words, the second set is a poem, and the last line is a clarifying statement. The whole poem forms a pyramid.


Chapter 116
Elephant Ears

By Treischel

Elephant Ear
(A Naani Poem)





Leafy elephant ear
Green with red veined ripples
Looks like a magic carpet
That floats in thin air


Author Notes I just like the way this leaf looks like it's floating.

This poem is an Naani.
A Naani poem has 4 lines. The total number of syllables in the poem are between 20 to 25. While the poem does not have to be about a particular subject it is often about human relations or current statements. It may or may not be rhymed.
This one has 24 syllables, unrhymed.

The photograph is one taken by the author.


Chapter 117
Annoying Cat

By Treischel

Annoying cat
(A 1-6-1 Poem)






Cat
No need to act like that
Scat!


Author Notes This was frequently me at about 3AM every morning until, I finally got rid of the cats.

Dang, when I looked at the 1-6-1 prompt, there were 3 openings, but I only had 98 cents. By the time I reviewed up $5 ( about one hour), the contest was full. Oh well, I'm posting it anyway.

This image is from Bing Images.


Chapter 118
Color

By Treischel



Flowers!
Delightful display,
Elegant explosion of hues.
Color code
Touches from the Painter's palette,
Inspired red and yellow.
Voila!



Author Notes They add color to our world in delightful displays

This poem is a Cameo Poem
The cameo is a fixed form style of poetry with seven lines varying in syllabic length. It is one of the most simple ways of writing a poem and is frequently assigned in classrooms. It varies only in syllable count. The form is a heptastich (epta Greek; seven) or seven line verse and is unrhymed.

The Cameo Poem is written in a strictly counted syllables per line; no rhymes are used.

line 1 = 2 syllables;

line 2 = 5;

line 3 = 8;

line 4 = 3;

line 5 = 8;

line 6 = 7;

line 7 = 2 syllables

This photograph was taken by the author himself.


Chapter 119
The Best of the Breed

By Treischel

The Best of the Breed
(A 22 and 2 Poem)




Consensus has decreed,
when there's a need for speed,
a muscle car
by far
gives everything you need
to feed
adrenaline's creed.
Wherever you are,
whether near or afar,
light up a cigar!
Write your memoir!
Recount every deed
where you took the lead
and judges agreed
that the drive to succeed,
while setting the bar
on the course's road tar,
as shown on the pole radar,
has made you a star
above or on par
with the best of the breed,
a real car tzar.




Author Notes Vrooooom!!

This poem is a 22&2 Poem.
Never heard of it! That's OK, because I just made it up. A 22&2 Poem is a poem of 22 lines using only two rhymes. Any syllable count or meter is OK. The challenge is to find enough rhyming words and create a poem that flows.

This picture was taken by the author at a car show in August, 2012.


Chapter 120
In Days Gone By

By Treischel

In Days Gone By
(Rondeau)




In days gone by the cars were sweet.
The engine's roar was indiscrete.
The dash was hard, there was no belt,
No gas concerns had yet been felt,
And two could snuggle on the seat.

Their image really can't be beat
When cruising slowly down the street,
While hoping lady's hearts will melt,
In days gone by.

A lot of horsepower at your feet,
In search of dragsters to defeat.
At stops the car is looking svelte
As smoking tires squeal damage dealt
And any driver could compete,
In days gone by.

Author Notes This is a Ford Fairlane convertible. I miss those bench seats and driving with my honey snuggled under my arm. Everything has bucket seats now.

This poem is a Rondeau.
A Rondeau is a fixed form of poetry. It is often used in light or witty poems. It often has fifteen octo - or decasyllabic lines with three stanzas. It usually only has two rhymes (a & b) used in the poem. A word or words from the first part of the first line are used as a refrain ending the second and third stanzas. The rhyme scheme, then, is;

aabba aabR aabbaR.

The format can carry any type of meter or syllable count, as long as it follows a fixed pattern.

This picture was taken by the author himself.


Chapter 121
Blest Beauty

By Treischel

Blest Beauty
(Petrarchan Sonnet)




As I perceive blest beauty of the rose,
Its aura flows from many colored hues.
Oft' seen adorned in reds and pinks and blues,
There's even peach, whose center nearly glows.
Delight abounds where e'er one finds it grows.
You can't go wrong whichever bloom you choose.
Then wiff a waft, as from it fragrance ooze.
To fill the air and titillate the nose.
But, even with these formidable things,
Amazing assets set second-to-none:
The smells, the hues, the beauty that it brings,
Yet there's another charming chime that rings
Adoring notes, the best under the sun.
It's precious you, Dear, for which my heart sings.



Author Notes Truly Blest, my heart sings

Well Valentines day is coming, and my Muse is waxing poetic romance.

This poem is a Petrarchan Sonnet.
Italian (Petrarchan) sonnet: the most famous early sonneteer was Petrarca (known in English as Petrarch). The Sonnet was created by Giacomo da Lentini, head of the Sicilian School under Emperor Frederick II. The first ones were written in Italian. The structure of a typical Italian sonnet of this time included two parts that together formed a compact form of "argument". First, the octave (two quatrains), forms the "proposition", which describes a "problem", or "question", followed by a sestet (two tercets), which proposes a "resolution". Typically, the ninth line initiates what is called the "turn", or "volta", which signals the move from proposition to resolution. Even in sonnets that don't strictly follow the problem/resolution structure, the ninth line still often marks a "turn" by signaling a change in the tone, mood, or stance of the poem.

Later, the a-b-b-a, a-b-b-a pattern became the standard for Italian sonnets. For the closing sestet (last six lines) there were two different possibilities: c-d-e-c-d-e and c-d-c-c-d-c. In time, other variants on this rhyming scheme were introduced, such as c-d-c-d-c-d.
For this poem I chose the c-d-c-c-d-c structure.
Therefore the complete rhyme scheme for this poem is:
abba-abba-cdccdc.

This beautiful peach colored rose was photographed by the author himself at the Lake Harriet Rose Garden in Minneapolis, Minnesota, during September, 2013.


Chapter 122
Sentiments

By Treischel

Sentiments
(An Ultimate Pleiades)




Sober thoughts start this saga,
Seeking sense from sacred sand.
Searching out a sane solution,
Satisfying questions sincerely sought.
Science can't scratch the surface,
Shuck the shoe that fits cosmic scorn.
Separate sentient spirits are really scarce.

Send out sentimental stimulation.
See if all life is the same.
Seriously sense the same sensations,
Share the guilt of blame or shame,
Since only humans seem to savor sights.
Speculate seeing other species sad sentiment
Short of being beings thought simply slight.

So sing a song that's seldom sung!
Should all creation share salvation,
Saved by His sainted sacrificial stand?
Scrutinizing scores for someone's sake,
Sanctioned by the Savior Supreme,
Scrambling for affection's source,
Settle each soul's sacred strand.

Stated in the sacred scriptures,
Seductive Satan set a secret scheme,
Sold to Eve our sorry fates to seal.
Said the serpent ,"It's surely Safe."
Selecting apple seemed so simple,
Still we're sentenced by scathing sin,
Saints and sinners seared the same.


Author Notes Cosmic sentiments about souls and salvation.

This is a Pleiades in its extreme or ultimate rendition. Actually it is 4 Pleiades.
Pleiades: This poetic form has a title with a single word. The poem itself has seven lines. The first word in each line begins with the same letter as the title. There is no requirement for rhyme or meter.
What makes this an Ultimate Pleiades (beyond the 4 stanzas), is the fact that it has maximum alliteration of the starting letter,S, and in addition, the last word of every line starts with the same letter too. Therefore, each line starts and ends with the key letter, and as much other alliteration of it as possible to still carry a theme.

The picture is from Yahoo images.


Chapter 123
Ash Wesnesday

By Treischel

Ash Wednesday
(A Poem)





A dash of ash
reminds us of
our original origins


Author Notes Ashes to ashes and dust to dust.

A simple 3 line Poem with a meter of 4-4-8

The picture is from Yahoo images.


Chapter 124
My Temperature is Rising

By Treischel



We know the earth's been warm and cold before.
The Ice Age was ten thousand years ago,
While tropics ruled the age of dinosaur.
Geology shows; cycles come and go.

Does mankind make a difference to the blend?
Do waste emissions twist our climate's air?
Or, does the cycle tumble end-to-end
Regardless what the human race might do?

Despite what drives the pundits to despair,
We overstate our true capacity.
The changes that our world is going through
Are natural swings of earth's geology.

So you believe in global warming, huh!
Today the temperature is only three.
To that idea, I'll have to say - - ta-ta!


Author Notes When I hear them talk about global warming, my temperature rises, as to the foolishness. We could just as easily be heading into a new Ice Age. The damage of just one volcanic eruption is ten thousand times more damaging to our climate than what mankind can ever do. We have an overinflated opinion of our impact on the whole.

Now, depleting the Ozone layer and hurting the atmosphere - that's another matter!

Ta-ta: a very British way to say "goodbye".

This poem is a Carret Sonnet.
The Carrett Sonnet was created by Stephen A Carter (Carter + Sonnet). It is a 15 line Sonnet consisting of 3 Quatrains with a closing Tercet. It has an inter-twining rhyme scheme, as follows:

abab cdce dfef fgf

It requires a meter of 10 beats per line in iambic pentameter.

For this contest, the requirement was also to be topic specific: Global Warming

The picture is from Yahoo Images


Chapter 125
The Storm has Passed

By Treischel

The Storm has Passed
(Tercets)




The storm has passed
And I'm aghast
At the damage that was done.

The trees are broke
And "Holy Smoke!
The buildings are all just gone!"

Just hope and pray
That those who stay
Can rebuild, not be undone.


Author Notes This is picture from hurricane Sandy along the new Jersey shore., but it could just as well be from any one storm. My muse is from a snow storm we had here last night. It wasn't this bad, but got me thinking about other storms.

This poem is a Tercet.
A Tercet is a Poem having three line stanzas. A unit or group of three lines of verse which are rhymed together or have a rhyme scheme that interlaces with an adjoining Tercet. They may have variable meter.

There are several rhyming options, which makes the Tercet very versatile:

aba bcb ded

aba cbc dbd

aab ccb ddb

abb acc add

aba aba aba

aab aac aad

aaa bbb ccc

For this poem, I chose aab ccb ddb
This poem's meter is: 4/4/7 4/4/7 4/4/7

The picture is from Yahoo Images.


Chapter 126
Love Notes

By Treischel

Love Notes
(A Tyburn)




Sweet note
Emote
Devote
Love smote
To love devote, you'll become love smote
Then true love will emote a sweet note



Author Notes Oh, to be in Love!

This poem is a Tyburn.

Tyburn: A six line poem consisting of 2, 2, 2, 2, 9, 9 syllables.

The first four lines rhyme and are all descriptive words. The last two lines rhyme and incorporate the first, second, third, and fourth lines as the 5th through 8th syllables.

Syllable Count
line 1 - 2 syllables
line 2 - 2 syllables
line 3 - 2 syllables
line 4 - 2 syllables
line 5 - 9 syllables
line 6 - 9 syllables

The picture is from Yahoo Images


Chapter 127
Star Wars

By Treischel

Star Wars
(5-7-5 Movie Review Suite)





It was long ago
In Galaxy far away
Evil won the day

The Evil Empire
Built a planet killer base
Planned worlds to erase

But Jedi Knights fight
Respond to Rebel plight
Strive to set it right

While the Naboo Queen,
Lea, has the Death Star plans
To put in leader's hands

Confused agony
Aniken the Jedi Knight
Turns to wrong from right

Urged by Emperor
Feeling Jedi Counsel scorn
Darth Vader is born

Leads Empire's Dark Force
Fights the Jedi everywhere
Havoc and despair

While Luke Skywalker
And Obe One Kanobi
Pay Han Solo's fee

Princess Lea found
Rescued by Falcon crew
Gets secret plans through

Rebels fly to war
Galactic battles galore
Explosions and gore

Luke uses the Force
Drops bomb upon power source
Blows Death Star,of course.




Author Notes Just watched the movie again. Thought a review would be fun to write.

5-7-5 Suite of poems with rhyme.

Picture by Yahoo Images.


Chapter 128
The Games

By Treischel

The Games
(A 3-5-3 Poem)





Olympics
as I watch the games
I'm enthralled


Author Notes I love to Watch.

Image from Yahoo Images


Chapter 129
Oh Dawn

By Treischel

Oh Dawn
(An Aubade )




Oh, to wake with the dawn,
Become aware when all the dreams are gone,
To watch the sun arise
As morning rays glow to light the skies,
And share this moment dear
As two souls hug and hold each other near
They kiss at break of day
Then part, as each must go their way.



Author Notes We may part, but nothing comes between us.

This poem is an Aubade.
An Aubade it a poem about parting in the morning. There is no specified format other than to convey the essence of the moment.
For this poem, I chose an aabbccdd rhyme scheme and a syllable count of 6/10.

The picture is from Yahoo Images.


Chapter 130
Don't Play With the Rattlesnakes

By Treischel

Don't Play with the Rattlesnakes
(A Kyrielle Poem)




I found myself quite astounded.
It was placed there for safety sakes.
These few words really resounded,
"Please don't play with the rattlesnakes".

'Twas posted at the park entrance.
As I pulled up and set my brakes,
I read the purported hindrance
"Please don't play with the rattlesnakes".

I guess it is necessary
Whenever public undertakes
To camp where a sign's so scary,
"Please don't play with the rattlesnakes".

These facts should come naturally,
Beyond what all common sense takes.
I don't need a sign to tell me,
"Please don't play with the rattlesnakes".


Author Notes I guess some people do.

I was camping in South Dakota and pulled into the Bad Lands State Park. That was exactly the sign posted in the window at the ranger check-in spot. They also handed us a brochure that said the same thing. I was amazed that they needed to say it. I quess there's no telling what people will do.

This poem is a Kyrielle.
A Kyrielle is made of quatrains that rhyme. Each stanza (that is a quatrain) has a line that repeats a line from a previous stanza. That line will usually (but does not necessarily have to) be the last line in the stanza.
Each line in the poem has eight syllables.
Any type of rhyme scheme can be used.
There is no limit to the number of stanzas.
Usually there are three or more stanzas.
There is no specific meter requirement.

For this poem the 8 syllable meter is not iambic.
The rhyme scheme is:
abaB cbcB dbdB

This picture is from Yahoo Images.


Chapter 131
Let 'er Rip

By Treischel

Let 'er Rip
(A 5-7-5 Poem)





Still silence shattered
With the lion's mighty roar
It's dawn at the zoo

Author Notes I was out camping once, and didn't know there was a zoo next door through the woods. The lions roaring first thing in the morning blew me out of my sleeping bag and I was wide awake.

Picture from Yahoo Images.


Chapter 132
Morning Paper

By Treischel

Morning Paper
(Quatrains)


I love my morning paper
My favorite daily thing
Wakes up my wild nature
Especially in the spring

Most relaxing occurrence
In every single way
Acuteness in abundance
To last the whole long day.

Author Notes I was taking pictures at a park when I spotted this man enjoying his papers. I had to write a poem of the picture I shot of him. The tower behind him goes up a long way and is actually what I came to shoot. It is a light beacon for the airport below the hill. The wild nature I expressed in the poem refers to him reading them outside.

This poem is two quatrains with an abab rhyme scheme in 7/6/7/6 Meter.

This photograph was taken by the author himself.


Chapter 133
Muscle Cars

By Treischel



At any criteria
Been led to absorb
Cars are exotic.
Don't get addicted
To the power assist.
 

Author Notes I am a Pontiac man myself.

ABC poem per contest requirements

Author's photo.


Chapter 134
Bluebird

By Treischel

Bluebird
(A Quatern)

Bluebird sits silent in a tree,
So stately on its woodland perch.
I wonder as it looks at me,
The reason for its quiet search.

Resplendent in its feathered fare,
Bluebird sits silent in a tree,
As if it didn't have a care
Up there observing silently.

Almost missed in its branch debris
Until it moved a bright blue wing.
Bluebird sits silent in a tree.
I prayed that I might hear it sing.

I watched it preen and clean away.
It groomed its feathers happily,
Then danced a tiny bird ballet.
Bluebird sits silent in a tree.


Author Notes While I was out walking, I spotted this little bluebird hiding in the branches of a tree. The flash of blue caught my eye. I sat and watched a while. It preened its feathers and the shook itself like a little dance when done. I then continued my walk after taking this picture.

The Quatern is a French form of poetry that is composed of four quatrains, (four-line stanzas). It is similar to the Kyrielle and other French poems, in that it has a repeated refrain. But, unlike other French forms, it doesn't have to rhyme--there is no rhyme scheme specified. Similar to other French forms of poetry, the Quatern consists of lines with eight syllables each, and has no required meter. The Refrain starts as the first line of the first Stanza, then the second line of the second, the third of the third, and the last line of the fourth stanza. So it moves through the poem in a cascade.

This photograph was taken by the author along the shore of Lake Superior.


Chapter 135
Sunset Passion

By Treischel

Sunset Passion
(A Sonnet)




Dusk's skyline paints with palettes to behold,
Whence mellow clouds now purpled pink doth hang
While summer's heated air is turning cold,
The likes of which bards boisterously sang
About such colors shown at end of day,
Where glowing globe sits setting in yon west.
'Tis then the time that dreamers wile away,
Before all God's blest children take their rest.
Observe firsthand the sky lit up like fire,
Igniting passions where love's hopes may lie
Entwined when last of sun's rays may expire,
They kiss to promises made bye-the-bye.
The pull of passion's grip is very strong.
When prayers arise may ardor last most long.


Author Notes This was inspired by Gunaglo's poem, Was the Bard Mistaken, who took up a challenge to write a Sonnet using the end rhyming words from Shakespeare's 73rd sonnet.


That time of year thou mayst in me behold,
When yellow leaves, or none, or few, do hang
Upon those boughs which shake against the cold,
Bare ruined choirs, where late the sweet birds sang.
In me thou seest the twilight of such day,
As after sunset fadeth in the west,
Which by and by black night doth take away,
Death's second self, that seals up all in rest.
In me thou seest the glowing of such fire,
That on the ashes of his youth doth lie,
As the death-bed whereon it must expire,
Consumed with that which it was nourished by.
This thou perceiv'st, which makes thy love more strong,
To love that well, which thou must leave ere long.

William Shakespeare

Here is my response.

This author took this photograph himself, but enhanced the color.


Chapter 136
New Dawn

By Treischel

New Dawn
(A Whitney Poem)





Awaken!
As morning breaks,
New sunrise,
To wings flock takes.
Foggy skies,
Vitality,
That reality implies.

Greet the day
As the birds do,
Lifted up
In morning dew.
Every way,
Just drink a cup
Of this new dawn for you.

Amen

Author Notes Swallows greet the dawn as the sun burns through the fog. It awakens the soul. I was camping in southwestern Minnesota and had my morning cup of coffee with this sight.

This poem is a Whitney
The Whitney poem format was created by Betty Ann Whitney. This is a seven-line versed poem based on Japanese patterns

with a fixed syllable format that contains 3, 4, 3, 4, 3, 4, 7 syllables respectively.

No rhyme scheme is required, but may be incorporated if desired.
I added an Amen.

This photograph was taken by the author himself.


Chapter 137
Flow Free

By Treischel

Flow Free
(A Tetractys Poem)



Flow
Freely
Waterfall
Such sweet music
Cascading crescendo, to me you call

You bless this garden with serenity
Blended beauty
Here for one
And all
Free

Author Notes This poem is a double Tetractys.
A tetractys poem is written with 20 syllables. A tetractys can have more than one stanza. But all new stanzas must be have an inverted syllable count. There is no limit to the number of stanzas. This type of poem often expresses a complete thought
The structure is:
line 1 - 1 syllable
line 2 - 2 syllables
line 3 - 3 syllables
line 4 - 4 syllables
line 5 - 10 syllables
A double tetractys has two stanzas.
This type of poem does not need to rhyme.
I chose to include some rhyme here.

This photograph was taken at twilight during an evening walk with my wife at Lake Phalen. Taken July 2012.


Chapter 138
Bliss

By Treischel

Bliss
(A Two Word Poem)





Twilight Delight



Author Notes What more needs to be said.
Much can be conveyed in just two words. Advertisers know that.
I did manage inline rhyme.
Did I convey the mood? I hope so.
If so, SUCCESS.
I apologize to you reviewers who have to write more words than the whole poem. Been there, done that. Many Times.

This picture was taken by the author himself.


Chapter 139
Sacred Spots

By Treischel

Sacred Spots
(A 5-7-5 Poem)




Seek a higher goal!
Sacred spots that sooth the soul
help fulfill that role.


Author Notes A peaceful Garden is one such spot.

The author took this photograph himself.


Chapter 140
Overlooked

By Treischel

Overlooked
(A Reverse Rispetto)


When I chanced upon this lovely thistle,
Covered throughout with its parts that bristle.
Under my gaze was this overlooked sight,
Tiniest petals of purple and white.

Often considered a sticky weed bud,
Many people think this plant is dour
With its reputation dragged through thick mud.
Actually, it's a beautiful flower.






Author Notes Sometimes we overlook the beauty in things due to stereotypes. This is considered an obnoxious weed.

This poem is a Reverse Rispetto.
A Rispetto is an Italian poetic format consisting of two quatrains with a changing rhyme scheme. In the first quatrain is abab rhyming. In the second is aabb rhyming.

The meter is usually iambic tetrameter (but for a Reverse Rispetto it becomes trochaic tetrameter, the opposite of iambic) with a rhyme scheme of abab ccdd (but for a Reverse Rispetto the order is switched to aabb cdcd). So the Reverse Rispetto is the opposite in both rhyme scheme and meter.

Rispetto, ( Italian:respect,) plural rispetti, a Tuscan folk verse form, a version of Strambotto. The historic Rispetto lyric is generally composed of eight hendecasyllabic (11-syllable) lines. In its earliest form the rhyme scheme was usually abab abcc. Later, the scheme abab ccdd became popular.

This photograph was taken by the author himself.


Chapter 141
Contrasts

By Treischel

Contrasts
A Trigee Poem



To the East the sun will rise .........To the west sun slowly sets
As nighttime yields to dawn........... Late day turns to night
It shines upon my eyes..................that lingers without regrets
I awaken with a yawn....................but sleep soundly under moonlight


Author Notes It like night and day!

This poem is a Trigee.
For those unfamiliar with the "Trigee" form, you read the left half, then the right half, then follow the dots read the two halves together as a whole. It's 3 poems in one. The trick is that each of the 3 parts should be able to stand alone as a poem.
The Trigee form was created by (TD Euwaite and Richard Brotbeck) founders of poetsofmars.com and Tangled Web Press. Trigee should not be mistaken for a Cleave which is a similar form except Trigee form if extended must always be in a four line stanza form where a Cleave can continue beyond four lines and is not broken up into separate stanza format.
The Trigee form does not require to rhyme, but you may do so if you wish.

The picture is a compilation of three of the author's photographs.


Chapter 142
Lovely Lawn

By Treischel

Lovely Lawn
(Faux Limerick)




Oh what lovely plants that grace this lawn,
Along this path that I walk upon.
What do you suppose
is tickling my nose?
"Tis fragrant flowers, to which I'm drawn.

When I find them here within my sight,
As they fill my eyes with such delight,
I give praise to God,
For where I trod,
I'm blessed with bright blue, yellow, and white.



Author Notes This lawn is part of the Lake Harriet Rose Garden located in Minneapolis, Minnesota. Isn't it lovely?

This poem is a Faux Limerick.
A limerick is a short, humorous, often ribald or nonsense poem, especially one in five-line anapestic meter with a strict rhyme scheme (AABBA), which is sometimes obscene with humorous intent. The form can be found in England as of the early years of the 18th century.


The standard form of a limerick is a stanza of five lines, with the first, second and fifth rhyming with one another and having three feet of three syllables each (nine syllables); and the shorter third and fourth lines also rhyming with each other, but having only two feet of three syllables. The defining "foot" of a limerick's meter is usually the anapaest, (ta-ta-TUM), but catalexis (missing a weak syllable at the beginning of a line) and extra-syllable rhyme (which adds an extra unstressed syllable) can make limericks appear amphibrachic (ta-TUM-ta). Source: Wikipedia.
What makes this a Faux Limerick is, that I didn't follow the meter requirement, humor aspect, and only 5 syllables in the short line. So it's similar, but not exact.

This photograph was taken by the author himself.


Chapter 143
senryu (rest in peace)

By Treischel

senryu (rest in peace)




this rest in peace stuff
when all things are considered
is just for the birds



Author Notes I was driving through a small cemetery in Mendota, Minnesota when I spotted this flock of Turkeys. They seemed to project this statement.

The poem is a Senryu.
A Senryu is a Japanese form of poetry. A Senryu is identical to the structure of a Haiku. It has three lines. The first line has 5 syllables. The second line has 7 syllables. The third line has 5 syllables again.
It is primarily concerned with human nature. It is often humorous or satiric. A non-traditional senryu can have less than 5/7/5 syllables. A common variation is 3/5/3
Japanese poetry contains a number of esoteric rules. These include:
The unusual title format.
Lack of capitalization and punctuation.
There should be no rhyme and little alliteration.
The use of a word ending in "ing" is frowned upon.
There is a requirement to have a "cutting" or "turn" in the poem whereby the thought the reader anticipates takes an unexpected or surprising "turn".

This photograph was taken by the author himself.


Chapter 144
On-Line Game

By Treischel

On-Line Game
(A Blitz Poem)



Play a board game
Play on-line
Line games draw you
Line games rock
Rock on electronics
Rock the world
World of Chaos
World unlocked
Unlocked images
Unlocked loss
Loss of effort
Loss of time
Time with family
Time outside
Outside interests
Outside fun
Fun that's active
Fun that's free
Free to share
Fr ee for all
All that said
All that gone
Gone inside you
Gone for good
Good for nothing
Good for things
Things internal
Things that clash
Clash in battles
Clash of clans
Clans with archers
Clans with dragons
Dragons fly
Dragons burn
Burn defenses
Burn the walls
Walls are broken
Walls around
Around bases
Around camps
Camps with armies
Camps with troops
Troops with wizards
Troops destroy
Destroy resources
Destroy for gain
Gain some trophies
Gain winning play
Play less violent
Play board games


Author Notes I thought that the on-line game, Clash of Clans appropriate for a Blitz poem. I recently got hooked on this game, and now I'm obsessed. It is a Fantasy game with goblins, wizards, golems, dragons, witches, barbarians, wall breakers and such.

This is a Blitz poem.
Blitz Poem was created by Robert Keim and is a 50-line poem of short phrases and images. "Blitz" is a German word for "lightning" that infers meaning of fast. This poem has short fast lines. Often associated with a long, fast, deep penetrating attack that the Germans used during WWII called a Blitzkrieg. So, this is a fast paced, deep penetrating poem.

Here are the rules:

Line 1 should be one short phrase or image (like "build a boat")

Line 2 should be another short phrase or image using the same first word as the first word in Line 1 (something like "build a house") Lines 3 and 4 should be short phrases or images using the last word of Line 2 as their first words (so Line 3 might be "house for sale" and Line 4 might be "house for rent")

Lines 5 and 6 should be short phrases or images using the last word of Line 4 as their first words, and so on until you've made it through 48 lines Line 49 should be the last word of Line 48

Line 50 should be the last word of Line 47

The title of the poem should be three words long.

There should be no punctuation. Rhyming optional.

There are a lot of rules, but it's a pretty simple and fun poem to write once you get the hang of it. Basically you write two lines, and then take the last word of the second line to start the next two, except for lines 49 and 50.

This picture is from Yahoo Images.


Chapter 145
Pretty Pink Petals

By Treischel

Pretty Pink Petals
(Alternating Rhyme)



Pretty Pink Petals
Luscious green leaves
Spread to the sunlight
From which it receives
Life-giving warmth
That each one retrieves
To nourish the stem
To which it cleaves



Author Notes A lovely pink flower.

This poem is just simple alternating lines or rhyme, where every other line mono-rhymes. So that the resulting rhyme scheme is:
abcbdbeb
The syllable structure is: 54554554

This photograph was taken by the author himself.


Chapter 146
A Walk in the Park

By Treischel

A Walk in the Park
(Triolet)


Walk in the beauty of the park
with water running through the rocks
on pathways lined with cedar bark.
Walk in the beauty of the park,
where imagination might spark
thoughts of quite romantic talks.
Walk in the beauty of the park
with water running through the rocks.



Author Notes Wouldn't this park spark romantic thoughts?

This poem is a Triolet.
A Triolet is a poem with a fixed format. This one has a syllable structure of 8 counts or tetrameter. It is a poem of only eight lines with a rhyme scheme of only two rhymes (a and b) that can be represented as follows: ABaAabAB, where the fourth and seventh lines are the same exact line as the first. The eighth line is the same exact line as the second (This is represented by the capital letters shown). So, it is very important to compose the first two lines carefully so that the entire poem flows well and is enhanced by the repeats.

The photograph was taken by the author at the Japanese Gardens located at Como Park in St. Paul, Minnesota.


Chapter 147
Danced on Air

By Treischel

Danced on Air
(Couplets)




They danced on air,
this mated pair.

From earth they'd fling
in a graceful swing.

With feathered flair
they rose to midair.

Two geese on the wing,
an ordinary thing.

I became aware
of their presence there.

They owned the sky
as they flew on by.

It was such a sight
of two birds in flight,

As they hung overall,
I was in their thrall,

compelling the height
of my delight.

Their responses flow
when cold winds blow.

When I heard their call,
it was late late fall.

Their instincts know
when it's time to go.

So I waved goodbye
with a heavy sigh.

Author Notes Two Geese on the wing in the fall. I captured these two in flight. They had just taken off from a pond. You can see the one behind is honking away. Actually, I'm not that sad to see them go. They are noisy and messy birds.

This poem is just simple rhymed couplets of varying length.

This picture was taken by the author himself.


Chapter 148
Ancient Trails

By Treischel

Ancient Trails
(A Trinet Poem)





Ancient trails
Lizard tails
Extinct creatures that lived and died
Upon old Earth these beasts preside
Brutal brawn
Past Eon
Now gone



Amazing size
Callous cries
Threats will arise when prey surprised
Overcome by Raptor pair so undersized
Numbers prevail
Critters assail
Fangs impale



Now today
On display
We view this bygone hunt tableau
To imagine events from long ago
People saw
Dropped jaw
Total awe




Author Notes I took my grandson to see the dinosaur exhibit at the Minneapolis Convention Center in December, 2012. They had several animatronic displays. It was fun and impressive. This poem is inspired by this photograph of one of the exhibits of two Raptors attacking a Saurolophus.


This poem is a Trinet.
A Trinet is a type of poem that keys off of word count rather than syllable count. It is written with the following format: first two lines have two words, the next two lines have six words, the final three lines have two words each. So, the Trinet, created by zion, is a form with these specifications:

Line 1 - 2 words
Line 2 - 2 words
Line 3 - 6 words
Line 4 - 6 words
Line 5 - 2 words
Line 6 - 2 words
Line 7 - 2 words

Repeat this pattern 2 more times (Thus the Tri or three requirement), if centered correctly it provides visual impact.
There is no requirement to rhyme or for meter, but I thought this layout begs for the following rhyme scheme that I used here of:
aabbccc.

This photograph was taken by the author himself.


Chapter 149
Cry

By Treischel

Cry
(A Hexaverse)






Cry

Cry out
Cry proud

Cry tearful
Cry out loud
Cry with pain

Cry to Heaven
Cry not in vain
Cry bleary eyed
Cry 'til they dried

Cry for purest joy
Cry from injustice
Cry misunderstood
Cry for all that's good
Cry when it's goodbye


Author Notes Why do we cry?
This poem is a Hexaverse.
A Hexaverse is a type of poem that relates stanza lines to syllable count in increasing volume. It starts with a 1 syllable, 1 line stanza (also the Title of the poem; then 2 syllables, 2 lines; then 3 syllables, 3 lines; then 4 syllables, 4 lines; and then 5 syllables, 5 lines.

This picture is from Yahoo Images.


Chapter 150
Children at the Playground

By Treischel



The children at the playground swing
As parents share in their delights
While keeping them within their sights
To make sure each one safely clings.

The joy that soaring heights can bring
Reflects on face when push excites.
The Children at the playground swing
As parents share in their delights.

It starts with gentle upward fling,
Increasing with progressive might
To pleas for more from little sprits,
Believing it's the greatest thing
The children at the playground swing.


Author Notes Parents and Children at the playground swings. Kids love to swing. Some can do it themselves. Others need a parents push. "Higher mommy. Higher".

This poem is a Rondel.
Rondel:This poem is the similar to the Rondeau poem. The first and second lines repeat in the middle of the poem and at the end. Although, only the first line repeats at the end. It uses only two rhymes (an a and b rhyme)throughout.
The rhyme scheme is normally:
ABba abAB abbaA(B).
There is no hard requirement for set meter, although for this poem I used iambic tetrameter.

The picture was taken by the author himself at Pearl Park playground in the Diamond Lake area of Minneapolis, Minnesota.


Chapter 151
Mother's Day

By Treischel



Hello Mom
On this Mother's day
I called to say
That you mean so much to me
And you fill my life with Love



Author Notes Happy Mother's Day

Image from Yahoo Images


Chapter 152
Child's Play

By Treischel



When weather warms to sunny day
Outside excursions can be planned,
To make some time for children's play
To slide, or swing, or simply stand
On playground apparatus bars
Like little monkey superstars,
Who play and build upon the sand
Imaginary roads for cars.

I'd love to watch them all day long.
Or, better yet, to even join them.
Would that? Could that really be wrong?
An irresponsible item
That casts all adult cares away,
Indulge in innocent child's play,
Pulled along by strong siren's song
To be a little child again?

Of course it wouldn't, couldn't!


Author Notes I watched the Children at the playground and wished I was a child again.

This poem is a Huitan Poem of 2 stanzas.
A Huitan has 8 lines of 8 syllables with a rhyme scheme of:
ababccbc

The photograph was taken by the author himself.


Chapter 153
Crimson Colors

By Treischel



Crimson colors grace evening sky
That kisses mirrored water scene.
Blends beautifully as hues apply
A vivid touch to sunset's sheen,
So often seen at end of day.
A sight that takes your breath away,
Reflecting sunlight, so serene,
On ripples in a quiet bay.


Author Notes The sky is on fire with a crimson sunset reflected upon the water.

This poem is a Huitan.
I was introduced to this format by Sunnilicious, a fellow Fanstorian, who came across it in her NaPoWriMo exercise. It is a format that consists of eight lines with an 8 syllable count and a fixed rhyme scheme of:
ababccbc.

This photograph was taken by the author watching the sunset at Lake Phalen in St. Paul, Minnesota during May, 2013.


Chapter 154
Shadows

By Treischel

Shadows may often come and go.
The shape of them you never know,
As they reflect upon the snow.
They may be short,
As some report,
But then again, they could be long.
There really isn't right or wrong.
Sunlight is either weak or strong.

And then there is sun's angle too.
The time of day has much to do
With how it is projecting you
Upon the ground.
I've often found,
You have to get the gist of it
By looking 'round you, just a bit,
To spot the image you emit.



Author Notes Shadows on the snow really stand out. I took this picture on sunny afternoon of my wife walking just ahead of me. I was intrigued be the shadow. She didn't know I took this shot. Shhh!

I don't know if this structure has a name or not. I just did what I felt like. It does have some structure though. Each stanza has a syllable count of:
8-8-8-4-4-8-8-8
The rhyme scheme is: aaabbccc

The picture was taken by the author himself in January 2012.


Chapter 155
Buds and Bloom

By Treischel

Buds and bloom,
Room to grow,
Throw the yellow
Mellow petal's glow.
Show the world
Unfurled color delight.
Ignite our imagination,
Elation in sight.

Buds and bloom
Assume their place.
Space is brightened,
Heightened by hue.
True colors shine
Design so devine.
Fine spring duds,
Buds and bloom.

Author Notes This picture of yellow roses in bloom along with a bud, inspired this poem. These were growing at the Como Conservatory in the Sunken Garden area, where they caught my eye.

I used the term "Duds" here in the slang sense as "clothes".

This poem is an End's Edge Poem.
The Ends Edge was created by the poet Vroom. I was introduced to it by Gungalo. it consists the first word of each line of the poem rhyming with the last word of the previous line. There is no requirement for line length of syllable count, but I chose for this poem to be limited to 3 words per line. I imagine this format is most effective with shorter lines as then the connection becomes most apparent.

This photograph was taken by the author himself.


Chapter 156
The Water Maid

By Treischel

The Water Maid
(A Dizain)




A pleasant sight, this tiny maid.
I spotted her unknowingly.
She's unadorned in flowered glade,
Toe testing water sheepishly.
Such a stunning spirit set free!

The setting was a luscious blend
Of color that bloomed end-to-end.
Enclosed in weathered cobble stone,
An artist's dream to comprehend.
Amazing she was there alone!


Author Notes Was she Real?

This water nymph is located in the Sunken Garden at the Como Park Conservatory in St. Paul, Minnesota.

This poem is a Dizain.
A Dizain is a ten line poem with either 8 or 10 syllables.

The rhyme scheme is: ababb ccdcd
I have used eight.

In a Dizian you can divide the poem if you wish into two five line stanzas or two four line stanzas and a couplet. I chose the first format.

This photograph was taken by the author in September 2013.


Chapter 157
Stony Beach

By Treischel



I was walking down the beach, while
treading stones, just out of reach. I'll
pick up one and then another next to it.

I look at shape and at texture,
may be colors in that mixture,
as I hope to find a gem, as chance permits.

Those that please me, I will keep, but
others don't end on the heap. Cut
out of treasure trove, ones I won't secure.

There's a few -- round, flat, and smooth that
are just perfect shapes that soothe at
bouncing several times across the waves with style.



Author Notes The lake shore along Lake Superior is very stony. It's a favorite spot for rock hounds and is famous for its agates, pretty rocks, and shells. A bit cold for swimming, it is great for fishing and skipping stones. A walk along its stretches are an adventure.

This poem is a Gertrude.
A Gertrude poem is a poem with a very unique structure and tempo. It carries sets of three or more tercets with a syllable count of 8/8/11 for a minimum of 3 sets. This poem uses 4 sets, making a minimum of 12 lines. The rhyme scheme for this poem is:
aab ccb ddc eea.
It uses the rhyme from the first two lines as the rhyme of the last line of the poem, regardless of the number of tercets. Had there been only three stanzas, the rhyme scheme would have been:
aab ccb dda.
If there had been 5 stanzas, the rhyme scheme would have been:
aab ccb ddc eec ffa
The tempo is the most unique aspect of the poem. The rhythm goes with an uneven cadence where the short lines end in a feminine (soft) accent, while the long lines end in a masculine (hard) accent on the last syllable. This pattern lends itself to enjambment well.
Another aspect is in the short lines. They end with a two word rhyme, as opposed to the usual single word rhyme.

This photograph was taken by the author along the shore of Lake Superior at Lamb's Resort and Campgrounds in Northern Minnesota. The region is known as the Arrowhead Region due to the sharp point that Lake Superior forms in the shape of that part of the State.


Chapter 158
Summer's Bloom

By Treischel


As season sends a summer's bloom, I'll play in clover fields,
Enchanted as the lovely flowered grass's fragrance yields
A bountiful bouquet arrayed in colorful costume.
I'll play in clover fields as season sends a summer's bloom.

As I make my morning pass, I'll run barefoot through the grass,
All over dew drops making rainbows, like a prism glass,
To be accounted with the greatest treasures I'll amass.
I'll run barefoot through the grass as I make my morning pass.

I'll find a swing to swing on, just to glide in summer air.
Then down a slippery slide I'll descend while playing there.
My joy is so profound. Embrace the season 'fore it's gone.
Just to glide in summer air, I'll find a swing to swing on.

Come out from that stuffy house to enjoy the fresh clean air.
Run barefoot through the clover that is growing everywhere.
The wonders will be waiting. Bring the children and the spouse.
To enjoy the fresh clean air, come out from that stuffy house.




Author Notes Clover in bloom with a playground in the background inspired this poem.

This poem is a Swapped Quatrain.
A Swapped Quatrain rearranges the first part of the first line of a stanza as the ending of the last line of the stanza, and the last part of the first line as the first part of the last line. Thus the swap. Each stanza has 4 lines (a Quatrain). There is a minimum of two stanzas.
For this poem i used 14 syllables per line (Heptameter).

This picture was taken by the author himself.


Chapter 159
The Beauty In the Ferns

By Treischel




What beauty dances 'midst the ferns
In twilight bright she twists and turns
So unadorned, without concerns

I saw her sprinkle fairy dust
A necessary aid, I trust
To make a magic spell adjust
The brightness there above the ferns

Accompanied by a thunder clash
It caused a momentary flash
Of radiance, a brilliant splash
That spread a glow across the ferns

A sight you don't see every day
This vision took my breath away
A naked nymph in full display
Prancing, dancing, within the ferns

Oh how I wish that I could be
Released to be as free as she
I'd revel in the liberty
Right there, surrounded by those ferns


Author Notes Within the Fern Room at the Como Park Conservatory is a fountain with a dancing nymph. I shot this picture through the ferns for effect. It inspired this poem.

This poem is a Zejel.
ZEJEL: A Spanish form. The first stanza, known as the mudanza, has three lines, rhyming aaa. All other stanzas, as many as you like, have 4 lines, with the rhyme going back to the first stanza.

Rhyme Scheme: aaa bbba ccca ddda etc.

Colloquial language tends to be used. Meter: 8-syllable lines (not obligatory).

This photograph was taken by the author himself.


Chapter 160
Sleek Cars

By Treischel

On city streets and racing meets the power of the car
is showing signs of draft designs expressing speed by far.
They widely roam on wheels of chrome within aesthetic shells
that look sublime and quickly climb to speeds where rockets dwell.
So thrill to the rhythm of the engine's roar.
Petal to the metal with foot to the floor.
Varoom, Varoom, the tail pipes sound,
While wheels are squealing on the ground.
Four hundred horses push G-forces to fractal limits.
Adrenaline pumps as motion jumps past lines the sign prohibits.

Watch them as they go flying past
So marvelous, so sleek, so fast.

They're flying low, as on they go, with crowds all cheering loud.
All through the cheers, the shifting gear, the leader's thick dust cloud,
there is a man who thinks he can come through to win it all.
Someone who knows how fortune flows when breakpoints hit the wall.
Stay clear of fear and quickly veer away from trouble.
Keep in place to win the race. Fame and fortunes double.
Screeching wheels, fire drills, flame retardant suits.
Crushing steel, prayer appeal, safety sought pursuits
I hear the squeal of slipping wheels. Swing left, swing right again.
Beware the mound, and swing around the searing sound of pain.

Watch them as they go flying past
So marvelous, so sleek, so fast.

For us fast cars are in the stars, we hope to own just one
that sets the pace of any race, and rates second to none.
No junk will do. We buy them new, unless they're classic models,
like muscle cars, or jaguars, that shriek with open throttles.
Succumb to the image that a car provides.
Be seen on the highway with the other rides.
Then satisfy the need for speed
where only autos can succeed.
It's commonplace, as is the case, we're smitten by their grace.
When so inclined we're pleased to find them in the marketplace.

Watch them as they go flying past
So marvelous, so sleek, so fast.
They leave the cheering crowds aghast.
Impressions that will always last.


Author Notes Cars are sleek, economical and powerful now-a-days. We watch them race, and dream about owning the expensive ones. A status symbol that many can only admire from afar. When we watch them go by, it fires our desires and imagination.

This poem is a Tambour.
The Tambour was created by Fanstorian RGstar. A Tambor is a very complex format that uses rhyme and different types of lines to provide pace and rhythm.
''Tambour'' = French for drum.

The reason for the title is the fact that the rhythm of the parade drum is incorporated in the poem. If one can visualize a parade walking by and the sound of the drums as they march through. The poetry is set to mimic the sound and roll of the drums.
It used 3 line types to gain this effect.
1) 'PACE' LINE= offers speed and an injection of emotion, intense or soft.

2) 'COMMAND' LINE = directs an order or a wish for a special action, strong or soft.

3) 'DRUM ROLL' LINE = creates that special rhythm in answer or in influence to the line before.

These are fundamental to the ''Tambour'' and without using them it is nearly impossible to create it.
The basic form has ten long lines containing in-line rhyming on most (but not all) lines, and aabb end-line rhyming , followed by short rhyming couplets, until the last which has 4 lines that echo the earlier couplets.
Pace lines and the short syllable (Command lines) break up the rhythm of your base, or normal, lines .. followed directly by a long syllable ( Drum roll line) in answer to it or influenced by it. Without these , the Tambour' would not be a Tambour'

The PACE lines throughout the poem are very important, because not only do they offer a break of rhythm, but what they contain or what they say are equally as important as syllables and rhythms they make.
Pace lines and the short syllable (Command lines) break up the rhythm of your base, or normal, lines .. followed directly by a long syllable ( Drum roll line) in answer to it or influenced by it. Without these , the Tambour' would not be a Tambour'

There is no fixed meter, just the drum beats and rolls.

The photograph was taken by the author at a car show in August of 2012.


Chapter 161
Dark Clouds

By Treischel



Dark clouds
In leaden sky
The harbinger of rain
It's time to think 'bout keepin' dry
Thunder and lightning threatens gathered crowds
That thought the storm would pass them by
Their plans now made in vain
Will soon decry
Dark clouds


Author Notes Sometimes that clear sky the weatherman promised for your outdoors activity gets interupted, delayed, or canceled. In this instance, the sky cleared in about 15 minutes. But frequently that's not the case. At any rate, this prompted the poem.

I didn't enter the Rictameter contest because it disallowed rhyming

This poem is a Rictameter.
A rictameter is a nine-line poem. Each line has a specific number of syllables. The first line has two syllables. The next line has four. The next line has six. The next line has eight. The next line has ten. And we work our way down again (8,6,4,2)
The last line is the same as the first line, while the two syllable line also becomes the title.

So it looks like this.

Line 1: Two syllables
Line 2: Four syllables
Line 3: Six syllables
Line 4: Eight syllables
Line 5: Ten syllables
Line 6: Eight syllables
Line 7: Six syllables
Line 8: Four syllables
Line 9: Two syllables - Same Line As First Line
Rhyming is optional for this format. The best display of this style is when centered, for then a nice ornamental shape appears.

For this poem I chose to rhyme. The rhyme scheme is: abcbabcba

This picture was taken by the author himself.


Chapter 162
Hydrangea

By Treischel



White Hydrangea
Don't need to rearrange ya
Your pretty pompoms
Catch the flower lover's eye
As they grace a walk nearby

Author Notes The beautiful Hydrangea flower plant is so recognizable due to its large round clusters of flower blossoms that resemble pompoms. One interesting fact about these plants is that they are mildly toxic with all parts of it containing cyanide. In some cultures it is smoked as an intoxicant. It is mostly used as an ornamental adornment to landscapes. Its most common color is white, but soil acidity can cause them to be other colors. Acidic soils may cause them to be blue, whereas alkaline soil may make them pink or even red.

This poem is a Tanka. It follows the 5-7-5-7-7 format. I added a touch of rhyme and alliteration which is not typical of japanese formulas, but was not prohibited in this contest.

The picture is a photograph taken by the author.


Chapter 163
Bench of Dreams

By Treischel



Where shall we go
Where and when
When can we do it
Whenever we can
Can we discover
Can we explore
Explore with each other
Explore on the map
Map to the shore
Map out a plan
Plan for excitement
Plan for us two
Two with attachment
Two on a bench
Bench where we conjure
Bench where we dream
Dream of adventure
Dream of far places
Places to chase us
Places to look
Look for examples
Look in a book
Book with the answer
Book with a map
Map for the searchers
Map with direction
Direction inspection
Direction where to go
Go where it beckons
Go with the flow
Flow to tomorrow
Flow anywhere
Anywhere it takes us
Anywhere we dare
Dare to go there
Dare to focus
Focus on friendship
Focus on fun
Fun in the sun
Fun on a trip
Trip we've begun
Trip dreamt of here
Here it was clear
Here on this bench
Bench of endowment
Bench of content
Content here together
Content just to dream
Dream
Together





Author Notes This statue of a boy and a girl on a bench is located in an upscale appartment complex. If you look closely you'll see that the girl is looking at an atlas, the boy at a book. The two are colabotating. Thus the inspiration for this poem.


Blitz poems are fun to write and are meant to be read out loud. These poems tend to be wacky and go all over the place. So, you can take the reader on a trip all over the world or to outer space, if you want, or maybe on a picnic or a trip to the zoo, county fair, theme park, etc. It can be a fantasy trip. It's up to you. These poems are exactly 50 lines long. There are specific instructions on how you go about writing these poems and how you title your poem.

The Blitz Poem is a poetry form created by Robert Keim.

This form of poetry is a stream of short phrases and images with repetition and rapid flow.

Begin with one short phrase, it can be a cliche. Begin the next line with another phrase that begins with the same first word as line 1. The first 48 lines should be short, but at least two words.

The third and fourth lines are phrases that begin with the last word of the 2nd phrase, the 5th and 6th lines begin with the last word of the 4th line, and so on, continuing, with each subsequent pair beginning with the last word of the line above them, which establishes a pattern of repetition.

Continue for 48 total lines with this pattern, And then the last two lines (49 and 50) repeat the last word of line 48, then the last word of line 47.

The title must be only three words, with some sort of preposition or conjunction joining the first word from the third line to the first word from the 47th line, in that order.

There should be no punctuation. When reading a BLITZ, it is read very quickly, pausing only to breathe.

The photograph is the author's.


Chapter 164
Boy with his Dog

By Treischel




What better friends are there, than a boy and his dog?
You'll find there's nothing transcends a boy with his dog.

Boys get along better with a dog than a cat
Who won't do the tricks THAT you can do with a dog.

At the break of day with a hug and sloppy lick,
A boy will spend hours tossing a STICK to his dog.

And there is no doubt that if any dogs could talk,
They'd ask their buddy to take a WALK with his dog.

A dog will happily greet you at the front door.
There's unconditional love GALORE from a dog.

They'll bark sometimes and want a bone, a friendly pat,
Or scratch while on a favorite MAT with that dog.

They're fluffy and friendly with a shinny wet nose.
Cud'ly companion - anything GOES with a dog.

It is forever loyal to the very end.
And that is why any boy's best FRIEND is a dog.


Author Notes Saw this boy with his dog at the park. Inspired this poem.

This poem is a Ghazal. Source: Wikipedia
The Ghazal was developed in Persia in the 10th century AD from the Arabic verse form qasida. It was brought to India with the Mogul invasion in the 12th century. The Ghazal tradition is currently practiced in Iran (Farsi), Pakistan (Urdu) and India (Urdu and Hindi).

A traditional Ghazal consists of five to fifteen couplets, typically seven. A refrain (a repeated word or phrase) appears at the end of both lines of the first couplet and at the end of the second line in each succeeding couplet. In addition, one or more words before the refrain are rhymes or partial rhymes. The lines should be of approximately the same length and meter. Each couplet should be a poem in itself, like a pearl in a necklace. Ghazal's form with this layout, where "1R" represents the repeated refrain preceded by a rhyme; the other lines end with non-rhyme words, represented by "A," "B," and so on:

1R,1R - A,1R - B,1R - C,1R - D,1R ...

This photograph was taken by the author himself.


Chapter 165
To Sit and Fish

By Treischel

Glorious day to sit and fish!
Too bad I didn't get a bite.
To be outside's my fondest wish!
'Til bolts of lightning come in sight.

My favorite spot has lots of fish.
They gobbled worms, but not the hook.
I thought I'd catch a tasty dish,
But I caught nothing I could cook.

I love to sit and contemplate,
But then storm clouds came passing through.
A day outside intoxicates,
Until the sky turns black from blue.

Author Notes You can't always get what you want - Mick Jagger.

This poem is a Mix-Passion Poem.
A Mix-Passion Poem is a poem of rhyming quatrains where the lines alternate between happy/funny and sad/grief. No specific meter is required.

This picture by the author himself.


Chapter 166
Tree Swallow on a Rail

By Treischel


Tree Swallow rests upon a rail
Observing traffic passing by
He puffs his chest and shakes his tail
A handsome fellow, you can't deny

There was a local park nearby
Tree Swallow rests upon a rail
He didn't even try to fly
While all around pursuits prevail

He sat right by a hiking trail
This pretty fellow wasn't shy
Tree Swallow rests upon a rail
A quite engaging little guy

His colors really catch the eye
Translucent blue in bright detail
I wished him luck, then said goodbye
Tree Swallow rests upon a rail


Author Notes A Tree Swallow sits perched on an Ornate Railing near a Park walking trail. It sat there unperturbed by hikers passing by. In fact, it sang to a few. I took his picture and watched for a while. He was still there as I moved on.

This poem is a quatern.
A Quatern is a poem consisting of four quatrains, where the first line of the poem ripples through each stanza. It becomes the second line of the second stanza, the third line of the third stanza, and the last of the fourth. This creates a rhyme scheme of:
Abab bAba abAb babA where the capital letter signifies the repeated line.
Written in tetrameter.

The picture was taken by the Author himself.


Chapter 167
Sing!

By Treischel


O song bird
Sing a song for me
I'll listen


Author Notes While walking along a nature path in Woodbury, Minnesota, a bird flew into a tree nearby and started singing. I had to stop a while and listen. It seemed meant for me. I snapped this photograph that inspired this poem.

At first I thought it was a Song Sparrow. When I got home, I consulted my bird book. It looked similar to a Song Sparrow, except for the white eyebrow. Then I thought it might be a female Purple Martin, but the chest and belly are darker. It turned out to be a female Red-winged Blackbird, of all things. It matched the markings perfectly, and I had seen and heard several males along the path of my walk. That cinched it.

This poem is a 3-5-3 Poem. First line 3 syllables, second 5, third 3.

This photograph was taken by the author himself. The original was a dark sihlouette, but when I adjusted the gamma on the print, the Bird was revealed.


Chapter 168
Everything's So Clear

By Treischel



When you see the world through knowing eyes
Everything's so clear.
Whether blades of grass or butterflies,
It all becomes so dear.
There is beauty everywhere you look.
Where Nature becomes an open book,
Whether seeing far or looking near,
Everything's so clear.

When you hear the Loon or Eagle's cry,
Everything's so clear.
Just listen to cricket lullaby,
Music to your ear.
Enfolded inside Nature's embrace,
Connects our soul with a primal place,
Our natural inborne atmosphere,
Everything's so clear.



Author Notes I was walking around Lake Palmer in Woodbury, Minnesota last Sunday with my Grandson, Jeremy. He was on one path, and I on another. I snapped this picture of him, standing below a hill, through the grass and clover. The way the plant circled his eye inspired this poem.

This poem is a Nonogram. The "Non" indicates the usage of 9. Never heard of it? I just created it.
A Nonogram is similar to an Octogram, with similar rhyme scheme, except instead of integrating 8 and 4 meter, it uses 9 and 5, and the a rhyme doesn't repeat like the B rhyme does. It consists of two stanzas with a meter of:
9-5-9-5-9-9-9-5.
The rhyme scheme is:
aBabccbB aBabddbB, where the capital letters indicates a repeated line.

This photograph was taken by the author himself.


Chapter 169
Summer Delight

By Treischel


As I delight at lightly blowing breeze,
It travels so softly across my skin.
Refreshingly real sensations begin
From top of my head right down to my knees.

I'm blanketed as air flows over me.
I revel in cool comfortable ease.
Each pore possessed with charged energy
While lounging peacefully beneath shade trees.



Author Notes Nothing better than lying on the grass under a tree with a delightful summer breeze blowing.

This poem is a Rispetto.
A Rispetto is an Italian poetic format consisting of two quatrains with a changing rhyme scheme. In the first quatrain is typically abab rhyming. In the second is aabb rhyming. But there are other variations. In any case, the rhyme must differ between the first and second stanza.

The meter is usually iambic tetrameter.

rispetto, ( Italian:"respect") plural rispetti, a Tuscan folk verse form, a version of strambotto. The historic rispetto lyric is generally composed of eight hendecasyllabic (11-syllable) lines. In its earliest form the rhyme scheme was usually abab abcc. Later, the scheme abab ccdd became more prominent, and other variations can also be found.

The form reached its pinnacle of both artistic achievement and popularity in the 14th and 15th centuries, particularly in the work of Politian, to whom some 200 rispetti are ascribed.

For this poem I chose a variation rhyme scheme of abba abab in iambic pentameter.

This photograph was taken by the author himself


Chapter 170
To the Top

By Treischel



I shall scurry
Up the hill
On hands and knees
If necessary
Though sand delays
My ascent
I'll gain the top



Author Notes This is a shot of my grandson, Jeremy, climbing up a sandstone cliff at Dayton's Bluff along the Mississippi River beds near St. Paul. I missed the deadline for the Katie 21 contest, but here is one by me inspired by this photograph.

This poem is a Katie 21.
A Katie 21 is a Free Verse poem that contains exactly 21 words, no more, no less. Rhyming is optional. There are no guidelines for the number of lines or specific meter. The poet is free to improvise, but the lines are typically short.

The photograph was taken by the author himself.


Chapter 171
Wild Lupine

By Treischel


On pristine prairie
flowers bloom
blue against the green



Author Notes Wild blue Lupine wildflower fingers wave in the grass on a prairie in Minnesota near Lake McCarrons in St. Paul, Minnesota. I loved the delicate form and contrasting colors that caught the eye.

A Luna poem as defined by the contest rules.

The author's photograph.


Chapter 172
These Bees

By Treischel

Two bees that flutter on white flower's face
Are drawn as sights and smells intoxicate,
Assisting bloom's attempt to pollinate
On sticky grains their tiny legs encase
That help to transfer true genetic trace,
Allowing flowered plants to propagate.
These bees are born, in part, to instigate
A complex process that is commonplace.
But oh, what beauty lies in fabled flower!
Such petals are adorned in purest white.
The center blessed with brightest yellow spot.
Romantics ask if love's true "here and now" were
But answered with a petal's picking plight,
Declaring "Does she love me, love me not?"



Author Notes Bees on Wild Daisy

Rhyme scheme: abbaabbacdecde
Meter: Iambic pentameter with one set of feminine iambic lines with 11 syllables (Line 9 and 12).
For the sestet, I chose the CDECDE variation.
Also, i used a two word convention in rhyming flower - now were.

Author's photograph


Chapter 173
Annoying Clock

By Treischel

In the nighttime ticking clock was
making noise I couldn't block, 'cause
it was sitting on the table by my bed.

As the tick-tock grew much louder,
Went to bathroom, took such powder
that I hoped would stop the pounding in my head.

Back to bed with face through pillow,
But the sound just seemed to billow.
It was haunting me without a real escape.

Night was long, the sound so eerie.
Got no rest. My eyes go bleary.
So I smashed that dang clock, to my own applause.


Author Notes Wouldn't you just like to some times?

This poem is a Gertrude.
A Gertrude poem is a poem with a very unique structure and tempo. It carries sets of three or more tercets with a syllable count of 8/8/11 for a minimum of 3 sets. This poem uses 4 sets, making a minimum of 12 lines. The rhyme scheme for this poem is:
aab ccb ddc eea.
It uses the rhyme from the first two lines as the rhyme of the last line of the poem, regardless of the number of tercets. Had there been only three stanzas, the rhyme scheme would have been:
aab ccb dda.
If there had been 5 stanzas, the rhyme scheme would have been:
aab ccb ddc eec ffa
The tempo is the most unique aspect of the poem. The rhythm goes with an uneven cadence where the short lines end in a feminine (soft) accent, while the long lines end in a masculine (hard) accent on the last syllable. This pattern lends itself to enjambment well.
Another aspect is in the short lines. They end with a two word rhyme, as opposed to the usual single word rhyme.

This picture is from Yahoo Images


Chapter 174
Take and Feel

By Treischel


Take me to the river
Take me there in the fall
Take a look at nature
Take time to see it all

Feel refreshing crispness
Feel Autumn coming through
Feel the touching stillness
Feel Fall surrounding you

Take a walk by water
Take in the turning trees
Take a son or daughter
Take comfort in the breeze

Feel the awesome wonder
Feel seasonal delights
Feel the peace you're under
Feel oneness with the sights

Author Notes A walk down by the Mississippi river presented this autumnal scene that spoke to my Muse. Here is the poem that resulted from that experience.

This poem is Anaphoric.
The term "anaphora" comes from the Greek for "a carrying up or back," and refers to a type of parallelism created when successive phrases or lines begin with the same words, often resembling a litany. The repetition can be as simple as a single word or as long as an entire phrase. Not only can anaphora create a driving rhythm by the recurrence of the same sound, it can also intensify the emotion of the poem.

This picture was taken by the author at the end of Summit Avenue along the East Mississippi river road on October 21, 2014.


Chapter 175
Shared Sights

By Treischel



Let's all go out
Take family for
A walk

A perfect time
To enjoy the sights
And gawk

While trees display
Profuse fall colors
Once more

On hills and vales
Breathtaking sights are
In store

When we perceive
Such magnificence
Galore

So bring them out
And hold a child's hand
Today

Forever more
They'll remember it
I'd say


Author Notes Sharing the beautiful fall sights with the family. What better thing to do?

This poem is an Eleven77 which is a poem form created by an Australian Fanstorian poet: GarthL

It consists of seven stanzas each with a specific syllable count of 4, 5, 2. Last word of two (2) successive stanzas to rhyme. Finally, the last word of the each stanza to rhyme with the last word of the other stanzas.

Each stanza thereby has 11 syllables across 7 stanzas equaling to 77 syllables in total, hence an Eleven77.

This piucture was taken in the valley area of the Minnesota Arboretum located in Chanhassen, Minnesota, a suburb of Minneapolis.


Chapter 176
The Best Season

By Treischel


The seasons come, and then, the seasons go,
And each one has its own unique side show.
Their personalities, you can attest,
Diversify the world in cosmic flow.

One season stands out far above the rest.
Eyewitnesses will surely be impressed
With splendid colors evident each fall.
That's why the Autumn season is the best!

There is a sense of magic to it all,
A sudden burst of color to enthrall
Our senses with intoxicating sights
That answer to the whims of Nature's call.

Such joy the panoramic scene invites,
When beauty of the canopy ignites
In reds and yellows, oranges and greens,
In one of Earth's spectacular delights.

God's handiworks displayed in vibrant scenes
Unmatched in breadth and beauty, by no means,
As we receive the blessings Fall bestows,
Before the trial of Winter reconvenes.

You must regard the season's ebb and flow,
Denoted as the leaves are falling slow,
Or blown about to fill the deep ravines.
Enjoy the golden glow of Fall's tableau.

Author Notes What can you say when the beauty is breathtaking?

This poem is an Interlocking Rubiat.
It takes on all the attributes of a Rubiyat written in iambic pentameter. In this Persian form of poetry is a series of rhymed quatrains. In each quatrain, all lines rhyme except the third, leading to this pattern:
aaba.
An "Interlocking Rubiyat" is a Rubiyat where the subsequent stanza rhymes its 1st, 2nd, and 4th lines with the sound at the end of the 3rd line in the stanza before it. In this form, the 3rd line of the final stanza is also rhymed with the 3 rhymed lines in the first stanza.
This leads to a form like this example with three stanzas; note that the Rubiyat is allowed an unlimited number of stanzas, so extend the pattern as needed:
aaba bbcb ccdc ddad
I took the liberty of returning back to the first rhyme scheme as follows:
aaba bbcb ccdc dded eeae aaea

This picture was taken in a wooded area of the Minnesota Arboretum located in Chanhassen, Minnesota, a suburb of Minneapolis.


Chapter 177
Autumn's Neighborhood

By Treischel



Our neighborhoods are draped in colors new
with canopies of beautiful bright leaves,
displayed there as the cars go driving through,
A tableau every Autumn sweetly weaves.
The boulevards upon which trees all grew,
now cradle us with arches there achieved,
which now provide kaleidoscopic scenes
that mingle reds and oranges with the greens.

And OH, this is a lovely time of year!
A perfect time to be out and about.
There's crispness in the air. The skies are clear.
It's time to leave the buildings and get out
enjoying ambience that's present here.
The effort is worthwhile without a doubt.
Go walk a crunching, color-coated path,
or jump a pile to take a leafy bath.

I love this pleasing season's pretty sights!
No other time of year has so much grace,
with hues that carry such intense highlights,
as vivid vistas end up every place,
while birds prepare for migratory flights,
and falling leaves fill every empty space.
These blessings give a positive report.
My long lament -- "This season is too short".

Author Notes The avenues in St. Paul, Minnesota have trees planted on the boulevards. The branches reach across to form a leafy archway. At this time of year, their colors are spectacular. Thus the inspiration for this poem.

This poem is a Ottava Rima. It is a poem of Italian origin first introduced by Giovanni Boccaccio around 1350.
The Ottava Rima stanza in English consists of eight iambic lines, usually iambic pentameters. Each stanza consists of three alternate rhymes and one double rhyme, following the:
a-b-a-b-a-b-c-c pattern. There is no limit on the number of stanzas, and often was used in long epic poems.

The author took this photograph at Fairmont and Victoria street on October 17, 2014.


Chapter 178
Climb and Scurry

By Treischel



Climb
Scurry
Furry friend
Go up or down
The season's signs portend
That change abounds around our town
These golden leaves will soon be turning brown
Store needs of seeds, before the season's out of time
When Winter spreads its bitter cold white gown
No need to have a frozen frown
Cashed provisions commend
A squirrel crown
Go, my friend
Scurry
Climb

Author Notes The squirrels were out in abundance, scurrying about, up and down trees in the Fall foilage as my wife and I walked along the river path. At one point I counted 9 about a tree and yard. This up and down activity reminded me that there is a poetic format that goes up, then down, too. I wrote this poem inspired by the squirrels in splender, and the perfect poetic format. Hope you think they blend together well too.

This poem is a Diatelle.
A diatelle has a set syllable count and a set rhyme.

The syllable count is: 1-2-3-4-6-8-10-12-10-8-6-4-3-2-1,
Usually this format has 3 rhymes with a rhyme scheme of:
abbcbccaccbcbba.

I used that syllable count here, but for this poem, I changed the scheme just a bit, giving it a fourth rhyme to:
abcdcddaddcdcba

Also, the first and last word are typically the same word, but that is not a firm requirement.
A Diatelle is usually displayed centered.

The author took this photograph along the East River Road of the Mississippi in October, 2014.


Chapter 179
Red Sky

By Treischel



When sky turns red
It's often said
The weather can be told

A Red sky Night
Will bring delight
With stars a shining bold

Take as warning
Red in morning
May bring both wet and cold

It's often true
For what to do
Take note, both young and old

Author Notes My version of the old sailor's adage -
Red sky at night,
sailor's delight.
Red sky in morning
Sailor's warning

This poem is an interlinked suite of Tercets, which are three line versed poems. The first two lines of each verse rhyme with each other, while all the verses are interlinked by a momo-rhymed third line that carries through to the entire poem. This provides a rhyme scheme of:
aab ccb ddb eeb
The meter for each verse is: 4-4-6 syllables.

This is an evening sky that is one of Author's photographs taken at Lake Phalen in May, 2013.


Chapter 180
Rhythm of the Verse

By Treischel

 
 
 
Iambic
 
           Iambic verse in a pentameter
           provides a martial tempo marching on.
           It steps so smartly to the drum – da Dum.
           A driving beat can be relied upon.
           While anapestic draws me at a steady shuffling pace.
           Two tiny counts betwixt the longer ones -
           the beat is what gives lines a lovely grace.
 
And so,
 
Anapestic
 
          Such is the rhythm of verses when written that wonderful way.
          When they shuffle like Rumbas and Waltzes, the tempo’s at play,
          Sweet, as my feet feel the beat – da da Dum.
          But this pace, with its grace, isn’t easy for some.
          Still the words seem to flow as they go ‘cross the page, even so,
          To traverse on the verse in a firm even flow.
          Then your tongue has some fun as it catches the beat of the drum.
 
Note the rhythmns the verses take
As a poet the choice is yours to make
 
 

Author Notes Just trying to show the nuances. Iambic is like a march. Anapestic is like a waltz.


Chapter 181
The Pumpkin Dance

By Treischel



Rejoice!
Prance to the rhythm of the dance.
Like garden spirits, take a chance!
Celebrate this Season's advance!
No better choice
than add a voice
to Autumn's songs that fill the air.
The Horn of Plenty's everywhere!
As colors burst, become aware
of the pumpkin's
dancing Virgins.
Rejoice!



Author Notes I spotted this dancing nymph statue in the gardens at the Minnesota Arboretum. The pumpkins were added as an October touch of the season. The joy of their dance delighted me. These 3 naked girls (I called them virgins here) epitomized the spirit of a seasonal celabration with the flowers and colorful fall leaves. i couldn't resist the inspiration.

This poem is a 12 Line Exhortation, a format that I created.
A 12 Line Exhortation is a poem with 12 lines, starting and ending with a 2 syllable line that caries an exhortation, like; Get up!, Move on! Go jump! The whole syllable structure is:
2/8/8/8/4/4/8/8/8/4/4/2.
There is also a fixed rhyme scheme of:
AbbbaacccddA, where the capital letters are repeated lines.

I researched poetry types with 12 Lines to see what they are called. I found a group of poems called 12 Lines. But they are basically unstructured. I wanted some specific structure. I wanted a poem with 3 consecutive lines of rhyme, that played off 8/4/2 syllable counts and was positive in spirit. So I created this format and called it 12 Line Exhortation. I don't think this format previously exists, as far as I know.

This photograph was taken by the author in October, 2014.


Chapter 182
Junco Jargon

By Treischel

It's not absurd you haven't heard.
Is Junco not a winter bird?


Author Notes This bird that is perched on the railing of my back porch is a Dark-eyed Junco. The best-known species of the Juncos, a genus of small grayish American sparrows. This bird is common across much of temperate North America and in summer ranges far into the Arctic. So, it is very much a winter bird. Adults generally have gray heads, necks, and breasts, gray backs and wings, and a white belly. They are the most common bird on my bird feeder in the winter, along with the Cardinal, and Chickadees.

This poem is an Essence Poem.
An Essence Poem consists of a poem with only two lines of six to eight syllables each. The two lines are rhyming couplets. Each line must also have at least one inline rhyme that rhymes somewhere with the other line, besides the end rhyme.

There is no meter requirement.

This photograph was taken by the author in April, 2013.


Chapter 183
Stone Cross

By Treischel


I see a stone cross in the sky,
Constructed there for passersby
To lift aloft higher thoughts
That help relieve twisted knots,
Constraining mankind in vain,
Pointing to a higher plain.
I see a stone cross in the sky,
Constructed there for passersby.



Author Notes At the end of Summit Avenue, which stops at the Mississippi River, located in St. Paul, Minnesota, is a stone monument that is a stone cross. I sat on one of the marble benches that surround this monument and pondered. This poem is the result on my thoughts on the late September day.

This poem is an Octelle.
The Octelle has eight rhymed and metered lines. It uses personification and symbolism in a telling manner.

The syllable count is 8, 8, 7, 7, 7, 7, 8, 8
The rhyme scheme is AA1 - bb - cc - AA1.
The first two lines and the last two lines are identical, as represented by the capital letters.
The slight meter changes are subtle. The repeats underline the opening thoughts.

The photgraph was taken by the author in October, 2014.


Chapter 184
Raptor's Release

By Treischel



Released to freedom's flight,
A wounded warrior finds his way.
Once a hopeless plight,
Now to this propitious day.
(As I looked on in awe.)

Ruptured Raptor's wings,
Given some healthful human help,
Beat its broken things,
To heal as fast as Brigid's whelp.
(Thanks to those who cared.)

Now, with crowds galore,
An injured eagle takes to wing.
He's ready to soar,
As from his handler's hands he'll fling.
(And I was there to see him.)


Author Notes The Raptor Center of Minnesota takes in injured birds, heals them, and releases them again, once they have recovered. They do releases about twice a year. I attended one this fall, held along the St. Croix River bluffs near Hastings, Minnesota. I took a series of photos and then created this montage of one of the releases. This released juvenile eagle flew nearly over my head. You can see that it is still missing some of its wing feathers. It was an exciting day!

Whelp - offspring

Brigid - an Irish legendary figure known for healing. When her son was killed in battle, her tears wept over him, revived him.

This poem is a Bracket Poem.
I was introduced to Bracket poems by Ritchie, 9999pool, of FanStory. He challenged me to write one. Here were the rules:

TAB_that's me, another Fanstorian, created this style poetic format called the Bracket Poem in 2013. The stanzas can be in any format or style, but the important requirement is that each must have a comment, a statement, a question or even a philosophy or a thought (in bracket) at the end of the stanza. Hence the name 'Bracket' poem. This form allows the poet to expand on the verse to give credence and more meaning to the each verse. It's almost like an "aside" in a play.

For this poem, I chose to create abab rhymed quatrains with an 5,8,5,8 meter, then add the bracket statements.

These photographs were taken by the author on September 27, 2014 with his Sony Alpha camera on high speed setting.


Chapter 185
Shakespeare's Words

By Treischel



I read the Bard while in high school,
A mandatory homework rule,
To memorize "To be, or not ...",
And then, Macbeth's murderous plot.
Now, at that early age I really found it hard
To comprehend the verses, when I read the Bard.

As I matured, I found the worth.
His eloquence had given birth
To my own sensibilities.
I mastered, now, the "thys" and "thees".
Elizabethan language lessons finally cured
My ignorance about his verse, as I matured.

I covet now his every word.
I doubt this news may sound absurd.
I bought this book of all his works.
It's one of my retirement perks
To daily cherish the thoughts that his words endow,
Those very words that once I loathed, I covet now.


Author Notes Actually this is ficticious, because I always loved Shakespeare, and memorized several verses that I can recall even to this day. I was most pleased when I found the book, on sale, at a reasonable price.

This poem is a wrapped Refrain.
A Wrapped Refrain, created by Jan Turner, consists of 2 or more stanzas of six lines each (sextets), with a wrapped refrain.
Meter: 8,8,8,8,12,12
Rhyme scheme: aabbcc
In each stanza the first 4 syllables (or 4 single syllable words) in the first line of the stanza must be repeated as the last 4 syllables in the last line. This creates the wrap effect, for which the format is named - Wrapped Refrain. The switch from tetrameter (8 syllables) to hexameter (12 syllables) allows the stanzas to be more detailed or create a final rush.

This picture was taken by the author of the book upon his coffee table.


Chapter 186
Exhausted

By Treischel

 
EXHAUSTED (ex-haus-ted)


 

Tuckered Out
All done in
Weary
Beat
“That’s all folks!”
 
 

 
 

Author Notes This is my grandson Isaac who is clearly demonstrating the meaning of the title word. Even this little dynamo can eventually get worn out. When he does, he just crashes wherever he might be.

This poem is a Teacup Dictionary.
The teacup dictionary poem was created by Rose Jones of Fanstory in 2009.
In a Teacup Dictionary poem the dictionary word is the title. Each following line must define the word, but drops one syllable per line, starting with the first line decending until there is a one syllable word that defines the dictionary word.
The last line, must have the same number of syllables as the dictionary word and makes an observation about the dictionary word or the preceeding lines.
The poem is usually centered on the page.

My daughter Aisha, took this picture of Isaac on her cell phone. So, I thank her for its use.


Chapter 187
Debonair Hair

By Treischel



Don't despair!
Compare the look
Took of your hair,
Where the ends mistook
Hook for flair.
There, for the picture book,
Looks so debonair

This grandchild
Looks pretty wild.

Cute little boy,
Enjoy the day.
Play with a toy.
Employ your vast array.
May your joy
Deploy today.

This grandchild
Looks pretty wild.



Author Notes This is my grandson Isaac. His mother sculpted his hair into the style envogue these days. That inspired this little poetic ditty.

This poem is an End's Edge.
The Ends Edge was created by the poet Vroom. I was introduced to it by Gungalo. It consists of the first word of each line of the poem rhyming with the last word of the previous line. There is no requirement for line length or syllable count, but I chose for this poem to be limited to a short sequence of words per line. I imagine this format is most effective with shorter lines, as then the connection becomes most apparent, but feel free to experiment.
For this poem I chose to use rhyme, which adds difficulty. I also included a refrain of rhyming couplets for imact.
So, the rhyme scheme of this poem is:
abababa CC dedede CC, where the capital letter indicate the repeated refrain.

This photograph was taken by my daughter, Aisha, on her cell phone. Thanks to her for capturing it.


Chapter 188
Abused?

By Treischel



A father's belt
Leaving welts
Impressions

Punishment
Laid down heavy
Not forgot

Yesterday's
Common rule
Now abuse



Author Notes I certainly got my share of welts while growing up. I survived and learned my lessons. Things have changed.

This is a Freud Poem.
A "Freud" was developed by Fanstorian, 'ann marie mazz'.

The rules are:
Three syllables per line
Three lines per stanzas
Three stanza limit
Rhyming is optional
The theme must contain a state of mind.

This picture is from Yahoo Images.


Chapter 189
Rain Transforms

By Treischel



Rain
comes down
around the town.
When the rain is done,
Then the plants in the garden drink.
Nothing like the bath you may think.
When the rain is done,
a refreshing renewal begins to take place,
one wonderful transformation that the flowers embrace.
When the rain is done,
soon blossoms show
and so
grow.

Author Notes Gardens look so refreshed after a rain. I couldn't resist photographing this one. I hope you can see the raindrops on the petals and leaves. It inspired me to write this poem after a cloudburst.

This poem is a Lucky 13.
I came across this format as I was reviewing Earthly Ecstasy by Lakeport.

Lucky Thirteen, created 6/20/2012 by Erich J. Goller, has 13 lines and 55 words. Rather than focus on syllable count, this format uses word count as follows for the 13 lines (thus the 13):

1/2/3/5/7/7/5/7/7/5/3/2/1

There is also rhyming and a repeated line that echoes through the poem.
Rhyming Lines are: 2/3--5/6--8/9-- 11/13
Lines 4/7/10 are the lines that repeat, so the rhyme scheme becomes:

abbCddCeeCfff,
where the capital letter (C) becomes the repeated line.

Any subject, one stanza only. No specific meter required.

This photograph was taken by the author in August, 2014.


Chapter 190
Family Ties

By Treischel


The ties that bind exist in more than blood,
For shared experience comes into play.
While parent's influence is understood,
It all combines with things we do and say
In families, where all is well and good,
And bonds abound that never fade away.
These lives that grew together at the start
Exist unchanged once lives have grown apart.

For brother's bonds are stronger than hard steel,
From mutual shared play and punishment
That served to form emotions that they feel,
Encouraged by their home environment,
And pushed by much parental hope appeal
To reach the highest goal accomplishment.
These men, now formed in common cauldron's fire,
Have gone on separate routes their fates require.

Although their paths in time and space diverge,
And one has passed into the great beyond,
Yet still their underlying spirits merge
In true unbreakable brotherly bond.
Where individualities emerge,
The core relationships of each respond
To the persistent pull of family group --
In an undeniable four man troop.

Author Notes This poem is dedicated to my brothers. The picture is of the four living brothers (top left to right: Joe, Chuck. Lower left is Dick. The one siting on the right is me) of five (Robert died in 1947 at age 2, before I was born). This photograph was taken several years ago, and since then my brother, Chuck, died of ALS.

This Poem is an Ottava Rima.
This poem is a Ottava Rima. It is a poem of Italian origin first introduced by Giovanni Boccaccio around 1350.
The Ottava Rima stanza in English consists of eight iambic lines, usually iambic pentameters. Each stanza consists of three alternate rhymes and one double rhyme, following the:
a-b-a-b-a-b-c-c pattern. There is no limit on the number of stanzas, and often was used in long epic poems.

This photograph was taken by my wife at my brother, Richard's back yard


Chapter 191
The Cobbled Path

By Treischel



I walk this path of cobbled stone,
Sometimes with friends, sometimes alone,
That leads me to a here or there
Where seeds, once planted, now have grown.

Now seeds have sprouted everywhere,
Some grown wildly, some groomed with care.
Regardless of their present state,
I find fulfillment waiting there.

Fulfillment fills the garden's air.
A simple walk in Nature's lair
Rejuvenates my sorry soul
With sights and sounds beyond compare.

The sights delight me as I stroll.
They bring me peace to help control
The tensions built during the day --
Daily stresses that take their toll.

For stresses often steal away.
Your hopes and dreams may soon decay,
Unless you recognize your needs,
And coddle them without delay.

Coddle them as the time proceeds,
To where the cobbled pathway leads.
The air is fresh where winds have blown.
So, take a walk and sow your seeds.


Author Notes At least for me, a walkoutside in nature has a calming effect and does wonders for my soul. So the seeds sown here are seeds of replenishment.

This poem is a Rubaiyat.
When one hears the name Rubaiyat, one automatically thinks of Omar Kyyam. So it is not surprising to the format originated in Persia. The Persian word means "four", thus the Quatrain is the primary verse structurein its composition, but the rhyme scheme is the twist that distinguishes the style of poetry from all others.
It consists of four line stanzas (quatrains) and is usually tetrameter or pentameter form.
Lines one, two, and four rhyme and the third line can be used to interlock the next stanza and by doing so with three or more stanzas, we have a Rubaiyat.

This photograph was taken by the author in October 2014, at the Minnesota Arboretum.


Chapter 192
Kids Today

By Treischel




Kids Today
don't
go out
to play.

They just sit
all day
in front
of
electronic
devices,

locked
in
video games.



Author Notes This was the scene this Thanksgiving - the audlt upstairs visiting, the kids downstairs playiny on the Wii. In my day, the kids would be playing ping-pong, tag, or hide and seek.

This poem is a Katie21.
AKatie21 poem is a free verse poem that keys off word count versus syllable count. It must contain exactly 21 words. It can rhyme or not, be about any subject, and punctuation is optional, and skinny stanza style is optional as well.
Skinny stanza style is writing one word per line.

This photograph was taken by the author at my son's,Sean's, house on November 27, 2014.


Chapter 193
I Just Don't Know

By Treischel


If you don't ask questions you want to know,
Then you won't find out what's making it so.

If water truly is the font of life,
Then why is pollution running so rife?

If you believe we are all good within,
Then why is the whole world so full of sin?

If you can't take it with you when you die,
Then hording possessions shouldn't apply.

If you believe all livings things have worth,
Then why is abortion allowed on earth?

If religions say they want love and peace,
They why is there strife in the Middle East?

If the start was accidental big bang,
Then what set off such a clamorous clang?

If no hidden hand sparked the Universe,
Then I cannot think of anything worse.

If the Almighty God does not exist,
Then what is the meaning of all of this?

If I knew everything these questions raise
Then my main wit would be worthy of praise.

Author Notes Just thought I'd ask.

This is an If-Then Poem.
An If-Then Poem is a poem of Rhyming couplets of varying syllable counts It contains a proposition with a response. The first line starts with IF, and the second starts with THEN. The theme in each stanza must relate to the IF proposition. All the statements combined must carry an overall theme.
Fore this poem I chose a fixed 10 syllable count. Variable meter.

This picture was taken by the author in March 2013 at Las Vegas. I cropped it and added the highlights for this poem.


Chapter 194
Cosmos Considerations

By Treischel



The sky spreads before me in blankets of light,
mysterious void in the darkness of night.
The heavens, like diamonds are flickering bright.
I delight in the mystery of it all!
The immensity, the vastness, makes me feel small
with concepts enormously beyond recall.
Those cosmic constructions show beauty and grace
exceeding the reach of the whole human race,
that tinkers and toys concepts of time and space.
Like a little child, I wonder in twilight
at sparkling tableaus making marvelous sights.
The sky spreads before me in blankets of light.

I delight in the mystery of it all,
as its deep enigma keeps me in thrall.
I hear Siren songs clear as clarion calls.
Those cosmic constructions show beauty and grace.
Through eons of time Nature couldn't erase
the signature wielded upon Heaven's place.
The realization of it is wonderful,
a spontaneous spark so successful
that the Universe became bountiful,
full of those things that can swim, fly, walk, or crawl.
While I am here looking up, standing tall,
I delight in the mystery of it all!

Those cosmic constructions show beauty and grace,
constellation patterns of ribbon and lace
that even a small simple mind can embrace.
The realization of it is wonderful -
Compositions cosmically colorful,
arrayed so, in a manner most beautiful.
Astonishing forces determine our fate,
that flow with the feeling of something so great,
far beyond comprehension humans relate
to experience we typically face,
that only zen masters usually trace.
Those cosmic constructions show beauty and grace.

Astonishing forces determine our fate,
expanding in space at exceptional rates,
igniting the cauldrons explosions create.
The realization of it is wonderful!
Swirling around in gravitational pull,
doing dazzling dances that are masterful,
those cosmic constructions show beauty and grace.
As the planets align in a tight solar chase
where the powerful pull of the sun sets the pace,
while all the stars light the way to Heaven's gate
on Earth man is learning a little too late.
Astonishing forces determine our fate!

The realization of it is wonderful!
I stand here admiring a sky so full --
canopy covering truly delightful.
Those cosmic constructions show beauty and grace,
as the planets, the moon, and stars interlace
in visions that only the clouds can displace.
I delight in the mystery of it all,
and ponder the moments of light that may fall
on this pitiful person who sits a wall
while some comet tails blaze just off to my right.
The scene never fails to amaze and delight.
The sky spreads before me in blankets of light.

Astonishing forces determine our fate.
The realization of it is wonderful!
Those cosmic constructions show beauty and grace.
I delight in the mystery of it all!
The sky spreads before me in blankets of light.


Author Notes The Universe is so big and we are so small. I often sit on a star filled night and think these thoughts. I tried to portray the wonder of it here.

Siren songs - in Homer's Odessy, the mythical Sirens in the sea sing compelling songs that draw unwarry sailors upon the dangerous rocks to their deaths.

Clarion calls - something you hear clearly that is commanding or hard to resist. The Clarion was a trumpet-like instrument used by medieval armies for instruction. In modern terms, a bugle.

Zen Master - an individual who teaches Zen Buddhist meditation and practices, usually implying longtime study and subsequent authorization to teach and transmit the tradition themselves. Zen emphasizes insight into Buddha-nature and the personal expression of this insight in daily life. The term Zen refers to the belief that one's mind is from the beginning of time fully enlightened.

This poem is a Canzone.
A Canzone is the very lyrical Italian poetic format. The original Italian canzone consists of 5 to 7 stanzas typically set to music, each stanza resounding the first in rhyme scheme and in number of lines (7 to 20 lines), followed by a short closing envoi. The canzone is typically hendecasyllabic (11 syllables).
I researched several sources describing this style and each was a bit different. One stated that there is no rhyme scheme, but a repeat of key words, like a Sestina. Others identified structured schemes. Most stayed with either 10 or 11 syllable lines. No specific meter was identified.
So, I chose here to go with 5 stanzas of 12 lines with repeating lines that grouped in threes, with variable meter. Each stanza also opens and closes with the same line. The structure is as follows, where the capital letters are the repeated lines:
Stanza 1: AaaBbbCccaaA
Stanza 2: BbbCccDddbbB
Stanza 3: CccDddEeeccC
Stanza 4: EeeDddCcceeE
Stanza 5: DddCccBbbaaA
Envoi: EDCBA

This picture is from Yahoo Images.


Chapter 195
Electricity

By Treischel



In eons now elapsed since things exist on planet earth,
all creatures lived controlled by moon and stars in dark of night,
and so it has remained for all, 'til man invented light.
When electricity was found to be a thing of worth.

That soon allowed a place where industry was given birth,
transforming nations overnight to futures looking bright.
Where God has lit the heavens, wouldn't it seem only right
that mankind's creativity allowed the light to come forth.

In new ways our enlightenment dynamically has drawn
the timid from cave darkness to the brightest culture heights
where useful manmade objects have created a new dawn
that harness energy, to go where men have never gone.
From flickers of a candle into incandescent lights,
it's electricity that we all now depend upon.



Author Notes One of the major inventions that changed the world. Only two entities have created light here on planet earth over the billions of eons that it existed - God and Mankind. That's something to think about. I believe that the way we are most like God is reflected in the Creator's ability to create.

This poem is a fourteener.
A Fourteener, in poetry, is a line consisting of 14 syllables, which are usually made of 7 iambic feet for which the style is also called iambic heptameter. It is most commonly found in English poetry produced in the 16th and 17th centuries. It can be used in a Sonnet, which has 14 lines.

I've done that here, writing in iambic Heptameter. Only, I wrote the Sonnet in the Petrarchan style, which has two Quatrains followed by a sestet. Usually the first two quatrains establish a proposition while the sestet gives a resolution.
The typical Petrarchan rhyme scheme is:abba abba cdccdc(or cdecde)
I modified this a bit by interlinking the "b" rhyme from the quatrains into the sestet.
Therefore my rhyme scheme becomes: abba abba cbccbc (skipping the "d" rhyme).

The Proposition is that mankind has created something new on this planet, akin to God's work. The resolution is that it has drawn us into a new age and become indespensible.

This photograph was taken by the author of a simple lamppost set against the sky. The autumn's leaves and blue sky represent God's best. The lamppost mans invention.


Chapter 196
Sublime Golden Balls

By Treischel




Four golden balls that calibrate time
In an heirloom clock with a chime
On our wood window table
Delights when we're able
To hear its soft sound
As the hour falls.
Spin around
Sublime
Balls!


Author Notes These balls are on a clock that once was my mother's that now my wife and I own. It chimes with beautiful soft music every hour, reminding us of her every time.

This poem is a Nonet.

A nonet is a nine line poem. The first line containing nine syllables, the next line has eight syllables, the next line has seven syllables. That continues until the last line (the ninth line) which has one syllable. Nonets can be written about any subject. Rhyming is optional. There is no limitation to the number of words per line. Only syllables per line. This provides a great deal of flexibility.

Ideally, when centered, the work will form a nice triangle.

This photograph was taken of by the author in November, 2014.


Chapter 197
Tangerine Sky

By Treischel




Tonight I delight in a tangerine sky,
As the sun set is seen through the trees.
Night birds are singing out their last lullabies,
Giving voice in the soft evening breeze.
Even tree branches, shown in dark silhouette,
Render the sky a fabulous frame
Invested with color you don't often get,
Nearest to shades of campfire flame,
Enchanting us while sun's beginning to set.

See the sight of the setting sun
Keeping its glow 'til day is done.
Yielding its light once night's begun.

 

Author Notes Flaming shades of tangerine seen through the trees.

First Stanza has 9 lines with 11/9 meter
Rhyme scheme: ababcdcdc

Envoi is mono-rhymed in anapestic tetrameter

Photo is the author's own


Chapter 198
Moving Steps

By Treischel



Shopping at the mall,
Shopping at the mall,
Moving steps take me up,
Moving steps take me up.
When I go shopping at the mall, you see,
The moving steps take me up to floor three.

But, then when I'm done,
But, then when I'm done,
They take me down,
They take me down.
But then, when I am done, these stairs
They take me down to lower thoroughfares.

I may go up and down,
I may go up and down.
I could shop all day!
I could shop all day!
Then I could shop all day, oh my,
And go up and down like a butterfly.

When I go shopping at the mall, you see,
The moving steps take me up to floor three.
But then, when I am done, these stairs
They take me down to lower thoroughfares.
Then I could shop all day, oh my,
And go up and down like a butterfly.


Author Notes This picture is of one of the escalators at the Mall of America in Bloomington, Minnesota, a suburb of Minneapolis. The Mall has 4 levels, but this shot was taken from the 3rd floor. You literally can shop there all day. The many escalators and elevators allow you to travel up and down with ease.

This poem is a Paradelle. This format takes a bit of warming up to. At first I didn't like it, because I thought all that repetition was rediculous. I a way, it is. But, once you get over that, you see how the building blocks are slowly assembled to finally resonate in the concluding crescendo. So you finally get it. I'm sure it takes at least a second reading.

A Paradelle is a French repeating form of poetry. It is considered difficult to write. It is comprised of 4 stanzas of six lines each (Sestets). The format is as follows:

In Stanza 1, 2 and 3 - line 1 and 2 are identical, as are line 3 and 4 identical, but lines 5 and 6 are a saying made up of the words in lines 1 through 4.

Stanza 4 - Uses all the words in lines 5 and 6 from stanza 1,2,3 to make a full saying to sum up the poem in the last 6 lines.

This photograph was taken by the author on February 25, 2014 at the Mall.


Chapter 199
Frog In a Jar

By Treischel


Frog in a jar is looking far
through molded glass. He plainly sees
an obstacle, to his unease.
I'm sure he finds it most bizarre.
For in his pond there seldom are
any foreign things, such as these.
Frog in a jar.

His eyes may seek a helpful star
to wish upon, the Fates appease,
to be released to pond and trees,
to eat insects and caviar.
Frog in a jar.

Author Notes My grandson, Jeremy, attended an exhibit where there were a number of frogs on display. He took this picture. This is a tree Frog. His image inspired this poem, as I saw and imagined it clinging to the glass, looking out, and pining is home.

This poem is a Rondine
This is another very neglected and a very challenging poetry form. It consists of two stanzas, a septet (7 lines), and a quintet (5 lines), making the poem a total of 12 lines. There is a refrain which mimics the first phrase of the first line (R).
The Rondine has a rhyme scheme of:
abbaabR abbaR.

The meter is open with the French style and not bound by a rhyming pattern and is a more light and buoyant even "flashy" form of poetry which uses short lines, whereas the English is more formal and uses Tetrameter or Pentameter.
This photograph was taken by my Grandson with my camera and my permission. I thank him for its use here.


Chapter 200
Twenty Nine, Nine

By Treischel



They sure don't make cars built like that anymore.
I could feel how solid, when I slammed the door;
Bench seats that allow the driver to snuggle,
While power steering makes turning no trouble,
And gas was just twenty nine, nine.

The car was surrounded with plenty of chrome,
That glistened in sunlight when I drove it home.
The dice on the mirror would blow in the breeze,
While half-moon hubcaps were all polished to please,
And gas was just twenty nine, nine.

A hood ornament would help guide me along,
With radio blasting my favorite song.
Gas station attendants would wash the windows,
Fill up my gas tank, and check the water hose,
And gas was just twenty nine, nine.

As teen with his dad's car, would go show it off,
Along city streets, at a red light standoff,
Then cruise through the loop to impress all the girls,
Gunning the engine 'til exhaust makes smoke swirls,
And gas was just twenty nine, nine.

I'd take my honey to drive-in movie date,
And almost always end up coming home late.
Dear dad would be checking the mileage gage.
When I came home empty, he flew to a rage,
And gas was just twenty nine, nine.

I'd often get grounded, but then I'd sneak out,
And with all my friends, go travelling about.
If I got caught, I knew which brother to thank.
I'd steal his allowance to fill up my tank,
And gas was just twenty nine, nine.

I'd love to be back there in those happy days.
Those times were the finest in so many ways,
When Elvis, the Beach Boys, and Beatles were stars,
Detroit was producing the finest of cars,
And gas was just twenty nine, nine.

Author Notes Those were the days of the late fifties through the mid sixties. I remember pulling into a gas station and asking for $.50 worth of gas. That's all I had on me, and I needed it so that I wouldn't be bringing the car home empty.

Quintets made up of four aabb rhymed lines of 11 syllables, with an 8 syllable interlinking line for refrain.

Photograph is the author's.


Chapter 201
Today

By Treischel



On cosmic circle, is today
Beginning, or the other way?


Author Notes Jusy wondering.

This poem is a Couplet Query.
This style was created by the author himself.

Couplet Query: two lines that ask a rhetorical question, since the answer is within the poem itself.

Syllable count 8. Must end rhyme. Two lines only.

Image is from Yahoo Images


Chapter 202
Inspiration

By Treischel


Canvas stretches to caress coming color
As true artist dips to the paint his brushes
Swirls and splashes blended to match a meaning
Masterpiece is born

Empty pages longing to drink in black ink
Hungry thoughts are yearning to have their freedom
Poet finds the dance of the words exciting
Published Poetry

Musical scores patiently wait to hold notes
Melodies that float like a butterfly flies
Maestro captures the bliss of cacophony
Symphonies transpire

Muse conspires to find, in a fertile mind, home
Brilliance soon begets a new inspiration
That's transmitted swift to the host so willing
Pen is the power

The essence
Inspiration


Author Notes Whether a painter, poet, author, or composer, it takes inspiration. It may come from inside or outside. Sometimes, its as if the page itself drinks in the ink hungrily. I tried to capture that here.

The poem is written in Saphic Verse.
The Sapphic Verse dates back to ancient Greece and is named for the poet Sappho. Sapphics are made up of four-line stanzas with three long lines, frequently of 11 syllables, followed by a short line of typically 5 syhllables. The main building blocks of the sapphic are trochees and dactyls. The trochee is a metrical foot with one stressed syllable followed by an unstressed one, while the dactyl contains a stressed syllable followed by two unstressed ones. The first three lines of the sapphic contain two trochees, a dactyl, and then two more trochees (making 11 syllables). The shorter fourth, and final, line of the stanza is called an "Adonic" and is composed of one dactyl followed by a trochee (making 5 syllables). However, there is some flexibility with the form as when two stressed syllables replace both the second and last foot of each line. Any number of stanzas can be written. The lines are unrhymed. Minimal punctuation intended by the author.

The picture is a photograph I took of a puzzle I did that showed Van Gogh's, Starry Night, speaking of inspiration.


Chapter 203
Shadows on the Snow

By Treischel



When Winter's locked you in, take the time to see
sunshine shadows on the snow.
To miss this is a lost opportunity
to view an artistic show.
Winter has such changing moods that come and go
on the wisps of howling wind
that sculpts the landscape, wherever it may blow.
So, you need to be thick-skinned.

But, when you make the effort to venture out,
when the sun is shining bold.
The majestic scenery will leave no doubt
as snow glistens like it's gold,
while the shadow shows on snow are so surreal,
no artist could do better.
Go out, experience Winter's frosty feel
wrapped in your warmest sweater.

For then, King Boreas will entertain you
With all Winter's finest treats.
Very soon you'll find that there's so much to do
along frozen fields and streets,
that you'll soon see there is no reason for fear
of a Winter's chilly grip,
when you take in stride this season of the year,
and your reservations slip.

Every season has its own kind of appeal,
as each follows in a row.
So, take notice when the winter skies reveal
sunshine shadows on the snow.


Author Notes Winter has its own beauty. Especially when the sun shines after a new snow. Then it becomes almost magical. As a native Minnesotan, I love this time of year. This house is one in my general neighborhood. I captured its image because of those shadows.

This poem is a Canzone.
The Canzone is an Italian lyric poem of varying stanza length, usually written in a mixture of hendecasyllables (11) and heptasyllables (7) with a concluding short stanza or envoi. May be abab or aabb in rhyme scheme. Usually two or more stanzas with 7 to 20 lines.

This photograph was taken by the author Februar 25, 2014.



Chapter 204
Season of Starkness

By Treischel



Cold winds leave us in the dark less.
Winter's grip yields to springtime rains.
Morning light shines through the darkness,
Showing everything Nature deigns.
Faded season full of starkness,
Beauty rests in what remains.

Morning light shines through the darkness,
Showing everything Nature deigns:
Barren limbs, abandoned lark nests,
Grasses growing on the plains.
Faded season full of starkness,
Beauty rests in what remains.

Barren limbs, abandoned lark nests,
Grasses growing on the plains,
Underneath a living spark rests,
Vital roots and dormant grains.
Faded season full of starkness,
Beauty rests in what remains.

Underneath a living spark rests,
Vital roots and dormant grains.
Waiting for Spring's watermark stress,
Activating chutes and veins.
Faded season full of starkness,
Beauty rests in what remains.



Author Notes Every season has its own unique beauty. Here I focus on early spring, just after the snow has gone, but before the leaves and plants have budded. The element here is Starkness. But even here, there is a raw elegance and the promise of renewal within those unadorned, naked limbs of trees and the faded grasses and dorment seeds.

This poem is an Roundelay.
The roundelay is an English repeating format. As a fixed stanzaic form, the English poet John Dryden, 1631-1700, created a two rhyme, repetition of lines in a set pattern that is recognized as the Roundelay. It consists of 24 lines in four sets of sestets (6 line stanzas) with a fixed format. The meter is often written in trochaic tetrameter with some of the lines catalectic (one syllable short) to create a strong end rhyme. Only 2 rhymes are used throughout the poem yielding an alternating rhyme scheme of:

ababab

in each stanza.
However, there are two key features about the format. First of all, the 5th and 6th lines repeat in every stanza, providing a strong echoing sentiment. Secondly, the 3rd and 4th lines of each stanza become the first and second line of the next stanza, creating a wonderful waterfall cascading effect. So the the trick is to blend everything to create a smooth story or thematic flow. This all results in the following rhyme scheme:

Stanza 1: a b A1 B1 A2 B2
Stanza 2: A1 B1 A3 B3 A2 B2
Stanza 3: A3 B3 A4 B4 A2 B2
Stanza 4: A4 B4 a b A2 B2

where the capital letters represent repeated lines, and the numbers represent the repetition sequence.

For this poem I did use the 8-7 meter option. I also resoreted to near rhyme in several places.

This photograph was taken by the author at Lake Elmo Park Reserve in May, 2012.


Chapter 205
Unto Heaven's Heights

By Treischel



Let your wandering spirit fly,
Free to climb unto heaven's heights.
As unbounded freedom invites,
Let your wandering spirit fly.

Free to climb unto heaven's heights,
Unfettered souls are want to be,
Once earthly bonds have set them free,
They seek celestial delights.

Unfettered souls are want to be,
Free to seek out their heart's desire.
In lofty places that inspire,
The climb goes on, definitely.

Free to seek out their heart's desire,
The face of God is what they seek.
Above the clouds and mountain peak,
to that golden place souls retire.

The face of God is what they seek.
As all things must return to Him.
Once one learns to sink or swim,
The voyage there seems far less bleak.

As all things must return to Him,
Let your wandering spirit fly.
Release resounding triumph cry,
Before our memories can dim.

Let your wandering spirit fly,
Free to climb unto heaven's heights.
Fade off from our constricted sights.
Let your wandering spirit fly.


Author Notes I wrote this poem about a soul going to heaven. The flight of an eagle symbolized that for me here. Then recent death of my wife's mother inspired the verse.

This poem is a Catena Rondo.
Catena Rondo is a stanzaic form created by 20th century Canadian educator, author and poet, Robin Skelton that uses interlinked repeating lines. The form lends itself to a longer poem because of the repetition of lines. Written in any number of 3 or more quatrains made up of 2 rhymed lines enveloping a rhymed couplet (enveloping rhyme). The second line of each stanza then becomes a link to the next stanza by becoming the first line of that stanza.
Meter is at the discretion of the poet. The verses are rhymed.
The rhyme scheme is:
ABbA BCcb CDdc DEed etc ...
until the enveloped couplet of the penultimate (second to last) quatrain repeats Line1 of the poem as line 2, thereby bringing the final quatrain back to the original scheme of the 1st quatrain ABbA.
So,in this scenario, the only line of the last stanza that could be original is Line 3 since Line 1, Line 2 and Line 4 are repetitions of the same lines of the first stanza.

The photograph was taken by the author in October, 2014.


Chapter 206
The Signs

By Treischel


The ice is melting fast along the rivers,
As open waters now are peeking through.
So say "Goodbye" to season of the shivers.
The warmth of spring is somewhat overdue.


The buds on trees, with promises of leaves,
Are showing now on branches that were bare.
It won't be long that springtime rain achieves
The fullness flowered fragrances can bear.

The eagle nests on trees upon the shore
Will soon bequeath brief glimpses of their young.
While male and female eagles have the chore
Of feeding hungry youth, once life's begun.

These signs are some the bards of spring have sung,
That herald home the news that spring has sprung.


Author Notes I chose this photo because it shows the buds in the foreground, both open water and ice, and the eagle's nest in the tree on the opposite shore.

This poem contains 2 lines of feminine iambic.

the author's photo.


Chapter 207
New Eagles

By Treischel


White feathered head with yellow beak,
A sight to seek.
In woven wood,
The bird nest stood.

A female sitting on her eggs,
Beneath her legs
Two incubate.
A needed wait.

But under constant sitting spells,
They break their shells.
A finished chore,
New eagles soar.

Author Notes They should be hatching soon.

The Author's photograph.


Chapter 208
Butterfly, Bird, Coyote

By Treischel



Beauty floats on butterfly wings that flutter,
drifting gently, ever so graceful, touching
down to drink the life-giving nectar.
Suddenly Swallowed.

Cowbird, searching sustenance, captures monarch.
Morning meal of butterfly slackens hunger.
Early bird contented with earthy forage.
Watched by coyote.

Sly coyote pounces on unsuspecting
Cowbird, while it's pecking for worms in fertile
ground. Coyote, triumphant, howls out loudly.
Singing its pleasure.

All life shares precarious hold of balance.
Nature carries lessons of fatal moments.
Victims may be predators out completing
natures life cycles.

Author Notes Just contemplating natures life cycle of the food chain. One moment there is peace and tranquility. Then it may be interrupted by sudden violence. You never know.

The bird in this picture is an interesting fellow. It is a Cowbird. From a distance it looks like a common crow, but is distinguishable by its brown feathered head. It is considered a parasitic species. It eats insects stirred up by herds of large animals when they migrate or forage, such as cows or bison. Since it must follow the herds, it doesn't have time to lay its eggs and incubate them. So, it lays its eggs in another bird's nest, to let the unsuspecting mother raise the Cowbird young along with her own. It's definately not into parenting. It only cares about selfishly feeding and breeding itself. I guess that's why I chose it to be eaten in this poem.

This poem is written in Sapphic Stanzas.
The Sapphic Verse dates back to ancient Greece and is named for the poet Sappho. Sapphics are made up of four-line stanzas with three long lines, frequently of 11 syllables, followed by a short line of typically 5 syllables. The main building blocks of the sapphic are trochees and dactyls. The trochee is a metrical foot with one stressed syllable followed by an unstressed one, while the dactyl contains a stressed syllable followed by two unstressed ones. The first three lines of the sapphic contain two trochees, a dactyl, and then two more trochees (making 11 syllables). The shorter fourth, and final, line of the stanza is called an "Adonic" and is composed of one dactyl followed by a trochee (making 5 syllables). However, there is some flexibility with the form as when two stressed syllables replace both the second and last foot of each line. Any number of stanzas can be written. The lines are unrhymed.

I must admit that I find long poems without rhyme less satisfying to me, and harder to write, because I naturally tend to rhyme. However, that is the requirement for this format. The form does lend itself well to story telling. I hope you like this one.

This photograph was taken by the author in July, 2014, at a park along the Mississippi in South St. Paul.


Chapter 209
River Shimmers

By Treischel



I stand on these river flats, observing the scene,
Keen to focus on the sights, soon to be revealed,
Concealed by bustling town that's amazingly clean,
Seen through these eyes, local river sights unsealed,
Peeled from sunlit spots, and everything in between.

The Mississippi River shimmers in the light,
Bright business building glimmers, its reflection glows,
Shows in silver ripples, a shining late day sight,
Right upon the river, where water channel flows,
Those shimmers on the river, flashing pure delight.

Where barges bear the burden of their heavy load,
Towed to destinations along the water ways,
Days or months consigned while they're floating Nature's road,
Stowed away in cargo holds held by ropes and stays,
Trays of coal, or iron ore, even new commodes.

Under bridges built to span mighty river banks,
Thanks to civil engineer's skill at construction,
Production moves across that gap along its flanks.
Tanks or cars may swiftly move without obstruction,
Introduction to the other shore among the driving ranks.

And all these things I viewed, to my utter delight,
Were just simple river scenes bathed in bright sunlight.

Author Notes Along the flats of the Mississippi, just below downtown ST. Paul, Minnesota, is where I took this photograph. It was about an hour before sundown, and sun was reflecting off the Comcast building. The bridge in the background is the Robert Street bridge. I wanted this poem to sketch the images captured here.

This poem is an Ends Edge Poem.
The Ends Edge was created by the poet Vroom. I was introduced to it by Gungalo. It consists of the first word of each line of the poem rhyming with the last word of the previous line. Typically, when you rhyme these connecting lines, you don't need to to rhyme the end lines. There is no requirement for line length or syllable count. I imagine that short lines work best for this format, as then the connection becomes most apparent, but feel free to experiment.

For this poem I chose to use rhyme on the end line as well as the connecting rhymes, which adds difficulty. I also closed it with a set of rhyming couplets, but that's not a requirement of the format. So, the rhyme scheme of this poem is: ababa cdcdc efefe aa.
I did experiment here with longer, 12 syllable lines.

This picture was taken by the author himself in April, 2012.


Chapter 210
Cold Waves

By Treischel



Waves
will go
with
cold flow
that's breaking
on the
beach,
where the
ice and snow
have all piled up.
Their crystals,
sparkling,
breach
the shore
in frigid dance
within
its
bold, cold
reach.


Author Notes Waves breaking on the shore of Lake Superior in March provide a cold inspiration for this poem. I missed the Waltz Wave contest, but was intriqued by a format I wasn't familiar with. So, here is my first attempt.

This poem is a Waltz Wave Poem.
A Waltz Wave requires a 19 line poem with a fixed format of syllables. The pattern is:
1212321234321232121
Words may be split by syllable to fit the pattern. There is no requirement for rhyme, but it certainly is welcome. This form seems to educe a soothing cadence, similar in aspect to the rythm of a waltz. The pattern visually evokes the image of waves breaking on a beach, when left justified. Thus the name - Waltz Wave. The theme doesn't have to be about either waves or a dance, but is perfect for such imagery. It is just suggested that the topic should be soothing.

This picture was taken by the author himself in March, 2013.


Chapter 211
Meet

By Treischel

I
go
out
when
desire
causes
needful
company
dearth.
Await
true
gal
to
X

Author Notes XOXOX

Just experimenting with the flexibility of this format. In this one I played with the letter count of the 14 lines.
The count is: 1,2,3,4,5,6,7,7,6,5,4,3,2,1.

This poem is a Word Sonnet,

The Word Sonnet is a relatively new variation of the traditional form that was championed by Seymore Mayne, a Canadian poet who teaches at the University of Ottawa. In essence, it is a fourteen line poem, with one word set for each line. Concise and usually visual in effect, this "miniature" version can contain one or more sentences, as the articulation requires.

Word Sonnets attempt to be pithy and suggestive poems in their own right. Many draw on the seasons and also aim for a compact resonance that may attract the reader to return to them again and again.

The picture is from Yahoo Images.


Chapter 212
Rescue

By Treischel


Climb
a
ladder
on
building
to
ascend
it
upward,
so
firemen
can
rescue
ME.

Author Notes Just experimenting with the flexibility of this format. In this one, I tried to structure words to give the impression of a ladder using a long, then short, word arrangement.

This is a Word Sonnet.
The Word Sonnet is a relatively new variation of the traditional form that was championed by Seymore Mayne, a Canadian poet who teaches at the University of Ottawa. In essence, it is a fourteen line poem, with one word set for each line. Concise and usually visual in effect, this "miniature" version can contain one or more sentences, as the articulation requires.

Word Sonnets attempt to be pithy and suggestive poems in their own right. Many draw on the seasons and also aim for a compact resonance that may attract the reader to return to them again and again.

The picture is one of the author's.


Chapter 213
Moment

By Treischel



A
Moment
In
Time

A
Feeling
So
Sublime

I
Watched
From
Above

With
Thoughts
Of
Love

Sweet
Complete

Author Notes Precious moments of love. There can never be too many.

This poem is a Word Sonnet.
I found this format while I was researching the various types of Sonnet. It intrigued me with its simplicity. Not only can you adjust from quatrains to any other layout, even just a solid free verse sentence, but a poet can experiment with syllable counts too. So I may try others. I thought I should kick off the collection in a recognizable manner.

For this poem, I tried to keep it more close to a true Sonnet format, so I gave it 4 verses of 4 lines, and included rhyme. This layout is not a requirement, and neither is the rhyme.

The Word Sonnet is a relatively new variation of the traditional form that was championed by Seymore Mayne, a Canadian poet who teaches at the University of Ottawa. In essence, it is a fourteen line poem, with one word set for each line. Concise and usually visual in effect, this "miniature" version can contain one or more sentences, as the articulation requires.

Word Sonnets attempt to be pithy and suggestive poems in their own right. Many draw on the seasons and also aim for a compact resonance that may attract the reader to return to them again and again.

This photograph is one of the author's.


Chapter 214
Cease for a Day

By Treischel



So bittersweet the morning light
That scatters dreams born in the night.
The rays that touch these eyes
Soon promise sad "goodbyes".

I must depart these silken sheets
To seek employment in the streets,
To leave the comfort of your arms,
Denied the vision of your charms.
So cruel these golden rays
That harken working days

Oh morning sun, would that you'd cease
But for a day -- just give me peace!

To be forever joined with one
Whose love shines brighter than the sun,
Then I shall gladly go
When once again you show.




Author Notes The warm silken sheets, and a lovers touch, make leaving to go out and work all day a painful moment. Tempting just to prolong it.

This poem is an Aubade.
An Aubade is a poem about parting in the morning. There is no specified format other than to convey the essence of the moment. The purpose of an Aubade is to convey the emotion of separation.

An Aubade is a morning love song (as opposed to a serenade, which is in the evening), or a song or poem about lovers separating at dawn. It has also been defined as "a song or instrumental composition concerning, accompanying, or evoking daybreak".

In the strictest sense of the term, an aubade is a song from a door or window to a sleeping woman. Aubades are generally conflated with what are strictly called albas, which are exemplified by a dialogue between parting lovers, a refrain with the word alba, and a watchman warning the lovers of the approaching dawn.

Aubades were in the repertory of troubadours in Europe in the Middle Ages. The love poetry of the 16th century dealt mostly with unsatisfied love, so the aubade was not a major genre in Elizabethan lyric.

Aubades were written from time to time into the 18th and 19th century. In the 20th century, the focus of the aubade shifted from the genre's original specialized courtly love context into the more abstract theme of a human parting at daybreak. Source: Wikipedia.

This picture of the sun rising above a sleep neighborhood was taken by the author on January 30, 2012.


Chapter 215
Poet's Posit

By Treischel



In words drown I
I did, did I
at a
noon
air aria


Author Notes We bequeth the page, the air, our thoughts as they tumble from our brain. I pray that they flow on. That I drown in thoughts and words. Lest they dry up and blow away. From this angle, the statue seems to convey my thoughts.

This poem is a Palimdrome.
A Palindrome is a word (or sentence) that reads the same backwards as forwards. So the word "Madam" is a palindrome. For a Palindrome poem you incorporate it into your poem, but do so with either sentences or words. When done as a WORD Palindrome, each line reads the same spelled backwards or forwards (although going backwards you might have to rearrange the punctuation or spacing a bit in your mind). However, in a SENTENCE Palindrome, entire words in the poem are readable forwards or backwards. This would then need to be true for the entire poem or at least each stanza in a Sentence Palindrome.

Simple example of a sentence Palindrome poem.

Life Is Good
Good Is Life

For this poem I'm doing the word version.

This photograph is one the author took of a statue of Leif Ericson in a Park in Duluth, Minnesota om April 26, 2012.


Chapter 216
Power Boat

By Treischel

I'll float my boat.
On pool or moat
Oceans or seas
Wherever I please

Author Notes My poor attempt at a boat Calligram. Not as good as the car I posted yesterday, but just as fun to do. I hope you like it anyway.

This poem is a Calligram
A Calligram is a poem, phrase, or word in which the typeface, calligraphy or handwriting is arranged in a way that creates a visual image. The image created by the words expresses visually what the word, or words, say. In a poem, it manifests visually the theme presented by the text of the poem. Guillaume Apollinaire was a famous calligram writer and author of a book of poems called Calligrammes. His poem written in the form of the Eiffel Tower is an example of a calligram.

The image was created by the author using a WordArt program and Powerpoint. I had to use Powerpoint because I couldn't get it to work in the Word Program, I then saved it as a JPG.


Chapter 217
Not a Stanchion

By Treischel


Madam
I
Gag
No, tie it on
A
Pool loop

Author Notes You know those ropes that get strung across a pool? They get clipped into a rung in the side called a pool loop. A stanchion is a pole or post from which a line is hung between it and another stanchion, to rope off an area. That should be sufficient information for you to envision the scenario here.

This poem is a Palindrome.

A Palindrome is a word (or sentence) that reads the same backwards as forwards. So the word "Madam" is a palindrome. For a Palindrome poem you incorporate it into your poem, but do so with either sentences or words. When done as a WORD Palindrome, each line reads the same spelled backwards or forwards (although going backwards you might have to rearrange the punctuation or spacing a bit in your mind). However, in a SENTENCE Palindrome, entire words in the poem are readable forwards or backwards. This would then need to be true for the entire poem or at least each stanza in a Sentence Palindrome.

Simple example of a sentence Palindrome poem.

Life Is Good
Good Is Life

For this poem I'm doing the word version.
This picture , taken by the author, is an example of one type of crowd control stanchion.


Chapter 218
Antique Automobile

By Treischel



I'm a ham,
that's what I am.
'Cause I just made this Calligram.


Author Notes I hope you see the outline of an antique car. Within it is a rhymed Poem that can be read several ways. This is my first attempt to do one of these. I hope you like it. I was introduced to it by Sunnylicious here on FanStory. The actual Calligram is the image. I just put in the silly ditty under it to have something to post. This format is very interesting. You may want to Google it for better examples.

This poem is a Calligram.
A Calligram is a poem, phrase, or word in which the typeface, calligraphy or handwriting is arranged in a way that creates a visual image. The image created by the words expresses visually what the word, or words, say. In a poem, it manifests visually the theme presented by the text of the poem. Guillaume Apollinaire was a famous calligram writer and author of a book of poems called Calligrammes. His poem written in the form of the Eiffel Tower is an example of a calligram.

The image was created by the author using a WordArt program and Powerpoint. I had to use Powerpoint because I couldn't get it to work in the Word Program, I then saved it as a JPG.


Chapter 219
Alien Gear

By Treischel




Radar
spacecaps
repel a leper


Author Notes Oh come on now! It could happen. An alien spacecraft lands on Earth right in the middle of a leper colony. The lepers are scared off by these strange beings with weird headgear.

Just another of my quirky poems. Having some word fun.

This poem is a Palindrome,

A Palindrome is a word (or sentence) that reads the same backwards as forwards. So the word "Madam" is a palindrome. For a Palindrome poem you incorporate it into your poem, but do so with either sentences or words. When done as a word Palindrome, each line reads the same spelled backwards or forwards (although going backwards you might have to rearrange the punctuation or spacing a bit in your mind). However, in a sentence Palindrome, entire words in the poem are readable forwards or backwards.

Simple example of a sentence Palindrome poem.

Life Is Good
Good Is Life

For this poem I'm doing the word version.

This picture is from Yahoo Images.


Chapter 220
Hillside Shadows

By Treischel




Dark
and Light
contrast sight
Abstract Shadows
seen when sun shines bright
that paints where the focus narrows
on the slanted hillsides, or bent meadows
black images forming, making patterns quite stark
of squares and circles, some lines and arrows
even strange birds, or wheel-barrows
created in black and white
outlined hallows
pure delight
we might
mark


Author Notes Bright sunlight shines the image of a tree onto a hillside making abstract patterns. I caught my eye and imagination.

Limited punctuation and the capitalization is intentional.

This poem is a Diatelle.
A Diatelle is a pattern poem that has a set syllable count and a set rhyme. When done correctly, it forms a stunning pattern that is an eyecatcher. The rhyme scheme helps create some beautiful verse as well. The longer lines in the middle give plenty of room for creativity.

The syllable count is:

1-2-3-4-6-8-10-12-10-8-6-4-3-2-1,

The rhyme scheme is:

abbcbccaccbcbba.

This picture was taken by the author himself along the Mississippi River bluffs just outside of St. Paul on March 28, 2015.

It is usually best displayed centered.


Chapter 221
Hue and Cry

By Treischel



I regret I wrote "The Outhouse"
With its potty humor queue.
'Twas offensive to my spouse,
As it raised a cry and hue.


Author Notes My wife is not a big fan of swearing or bathroom humor. So she objected when I went to post this poem.

OUTHOUSE


Distant
Walls.
Nature
Calls.

Frigid
run,
duty
done.

He
sits
and
shits.

Astride,
outside.

This poem is a Palinode.
A Palinode is an ode in which the writer retracts a view or sentiment expressed in an earlier poem or other written works. The word comes from the Greek "palin" meaning "back song". It can also be a recantation of a defamatory statement in Scots Law. Palinodes have been created by many medieval writers such as Augustine, Bede, Giraldus Cambrensis, Jean de Meun, Andreas Capellanus and others. Source: Wikipedia.

This photograph is one I used in the the original poem too.


Chapter 222
The Winner

By Treischel



I did, did I
a Toyota
racecar,
now I won


Author Notes Sometimes you get luck. No, I didn't.

This poem is a Palindrome.

A Palindrome is a word (or sentence) that reads the same backwards as forward. So the word "Madam" is a palindrome.
For a palindrome poem you incorporate it into your poem but do so with either sentences or words. when done as a word Palindrome, each line reads the same spelled backwards or forward (although going backwards you might have to rearrange the punctuation or spacing a bit in your mind). However, in a sentence Palindrome, entire words in the poem are readable forwards or backwards.

Simple Example of a sentence Palindrome poem.

Life Is Good
Good Is Life

For this poem I'm doing the word version.

I took this random photograph in Las Vegas on March 21, 2013 at the Venetian.


Chapter 223
Cramped Living

By Treischel

CIVIC
TENET
I'm a fool. Aloof am I
Evil did I dwell, lewd I did live.


Author Notes OK, I don't think all apartment dwellers are evil, but some are. This is just a poem.

This poem is a Palindrome.
A Palindrome is a word (or sentence) that reads the same backwards as forward. So the word "Madam" is a palindrome.
For a palindrome poem you incorporate it into your poem but do so with either sentences or words. when done as a word Palindrome, each line reads the same spelled backwards or forward (although going backwards you might have to rearrange the punctuation or spacing a bit in your mind). However, in a sentence Palindrome, entire words in the poem are readable forwards or backwards.

Simple Example of a sentence Palindrome poem.

Life Is Good
Good Is Life

for this poem I'm doing the word version.

This photograph was taken by the Author himself at an apartment complex in the Lower Landing area of Downtown St. Paul on September 22, 2011.


Chapter 224
Sky Refreshed

By Treischel





Catch
A piece of heaven on your tongue
Whether old or young it's fun to catch a rain
Drop

Author Notes Have you ever done it?

This is an Antonym Poem.
An Antonym Poem is a four line poem. The first line is only one word. Second and third line can be formatted as you wish. The last line is the one word antonym of the word on the first line. Words that are opposite or nearly opposite in meaning are called antonyms. Examples are big and small, or long and short.

This picture is from Yahoo Images.


Chapter 225
Yesterday's Storm

By Treischel


On Sunday took my grandson to the driving range
To hit a bucket full of tiny balls.
A lovely day to be outside
Enjoying time together, I recall.
But then the weather outlook started getting strange.


When clouds had gathered dark on angry weekend sky,
I clearly saw some ribbons of the rain,
And they were coming right at us,
Cascades of water were crossing the plain.
The look of cloudbanks that were hanging caught my eye.

Demarking where an angry stormfront line begins,
are clouds that hung down forming to a Vee,
And looking pretty nasty too,
They filled the sky as far as I could see.
It's time to seek safe shelter from the rain and winds.

I grabed my golf bag, tried to stay both high and dry,
We ran to clubhouse dodging drops of rain.
Sat under canopy valance
And watched as water washed down building drain
While torrents sheeted things exposed still under sky.

On patio, we sat and sipped sweet ginger ale.
Protected by the building's stout stone walls,
We watched as cloudbursts soaked the lawn.
Amazed, I gazed at some approaching squalls,
When suddenly the winds became a forceful gale.

The trees were being blown so badly, back and forth,
I thought that they may tumble to the ground.
A gust of wind then hit the tables -
Wrought iron, with umbrellas folded down.
Knocked several over, each one lined up facing north.

The parking lot contained those several stranded cars
Abandoned as the storm came racing in.
Right there among them was my own
Beneath a swaying lamppost, tall and thin.
I prayed the wind would never push that pole too far.

Then tarps attached to course equipment blew away.
And it occurred that structure strength might fail.
We thought it couldn't get much worse,
But that was when the storm began to hail,
And pound the ground with sound that snare-drum drummers play.


"Oh heaven, please protect me, and my grandson too!"
I prayed with all my fervent hope's appeal.
God must have heard my urgent need.
Then storm subsided to that state ideal
For going home to thank the Lord for coming through.





Author Notes On Sunday, May 3, 2015, I took my grandson over to the driving range with me to hit a bucket of balls. We got caught in a severe thunderstorm just after we had finished. This poem recalls that event.

This poem is a Symmetrina.
The Symmetrina was created by Fanstorian Pantygynt. I discovered it while reviewing his poem, Polhena Beach, Sri Lanka, 0600.

It is called it a Symmetrina because it presents a symmetrical shape and rhyme scheme over each stanza: The rhyme scheme for each is:
abcba.
The rhythm is iambic throughout. It is structured in Quintets, which are stanzas with 5 lines. The first and last lines are Alexandrine Hexameters (12 syllables), the second and fourth pentameters (10 syllables) and the third is a tetrameter (8 syllables). So the meter becomes: 12,10,8,10,12.
No limit to the number of stanzas.

This photograph is of some storm clouds the author took himself in March of 2012.


Chapter 226
The Maypole Dance

By Treischel



Fair maids at the Maypole, lovely young lassies
Delightfully dancing around and around.
Reaching for ribbons, festooned with flowers,
Playfully prancing they each gaily gavotte
In dance with their dandies who traipse the traverse.
Tight fisted to fabric, and pinned to the pole,
They move to the motion, then deftly divert,
She shuffling eastward, He heading toward west,
To meet for a moment in a winding whorl of worlds
To the curve of the circle and the pull of the pole.
Divergent deft dancing, mixed with May Day mirth,
This symbolic swirling set to some seasonal sway.

They move and meander, increasing intensity
Until, under unfolding patterns that prevail,
They suddenly stop to partners presented
Become casual couples as custom compels,
To dance for the day where the pole plans play,
Rendering real recent, or renewing, romances,
The Beltane begins in a beautiful ballet.
They now never part, but start stepping smartly,
While whirling and weaving, they're waltzing away,
Twining and twirling, twisting and turning,
'til the ribbon is wrapped as they pivot the pole,
Careening to center, where bodies blend in a bunch.

Some say it's evil to prance, play, and party
While wisdom gains pardon of Princes and Priests.
Is it pure pagan practice, or simple seasonal feast?
A phallic portrayal, or a tribute to a tree?
Are they casually celebrating our original sin?
From forbidden fruit that once grew in the garden
On the nub of a gnarled Knowledge Tree twig?
The verdict is vacant, as very many errors exist.
Its hidden history is hewn in mystical memory mists.
Parliaments and Protestants condemn this cavorting
While many more villages still vindicate its vision
Of community celebration, casually combining couples.

Today in the month of May, the tradition tends to stay.
In rural regions of Europe the ritual remains
Where the Fairy fantasies grew from the forests,
And the little people legends littered the lands.
The Germans still gather around the painted pole.
They yearn to wander yonder, whether young or old.
They delight in the dance from noon until night,
Celebrating their customs at traditional times.
So, let's travel to towns that plan participation.
We'll wander and watch while wafting fine wine,
Wherever we may find fair maids at the Maypole.


Author Notes Well, it's May. So I thought it would be a fine time to write about the Maypole. It carries quite an intriguing history.
There are many theories about its origins and purpose. It has been an accepted practice almost as many times as it's been comdemned. Most hold it as a pagan ritual associated with Belthane, festival of flowers, fertility, sensuality, and delight which may go back as far as the Greek worship of Baccus. Similarily, some believe it is a phallic symbol celebrated for male prowess, with origins that go back at least 28,000 years when phallic artifacts were found and dated from the Hohle Fels cave in Germany. More common is the belief that it represents a tree. Many early German cultures worshiped sacred trees. It may even been superceded by today's Christmas tree. Then finally, there is a belief of a Satanic celebration involving the celebration of Original sin whereby Adam and Eve ate from the Tree of Knowledge in the Garden of Eden, and his minions celebrate that event.
Maypoles have existed for centuries in Germany Scandanavia, and the British Isles. The Catholic church first tried to replace it by introducing the May Day procession of the Virgin Mary, successfully in Spanish cultures, and then subverted it by adopting the pole as an acceptable means for couples to be introduced in a benign community event. Protestants widely condemned the practise as evil.
The Maypole has been condemned by the British Parliament under King Edward VI, but was reinstated by Mary I upon his death. So, over the centuries it has been practiced and condemned many times off and on by many governments. The ritual still exists today, particularily in many parts of Germany.

Dandies- here I mean handsome boys dressed in their best.
Traipse the traverse - go the other way.
Gavotte - to dance like a minuet
Belthane - a pagan fertility festival.

This poem is an Alliterative Verse.
I was introduced to it by PantyGynt, a fellow FanStorian, in his Poem, Weaker Than Water.

The Alliterative Verse is form of the Anglo Saxons (the oldest written poetic form in the English language). It is medieval device of linking verses with a single letter, word, phrase or even syllable hook. It similarly links final and opening lines of the poem. The features are as follows.
No meter, it was a later development in English poetry.
Just 4 stressed syllables per line, 2 in each half line, the bare minimum is two alliterations per line, one from each half, three is to be aimed at and if you can get all four - great! Alliteration may appear on the unstressed syllables but doesn't count.
Interestingly the alliterative letter may come at the end of an unstressed syllable, as if it were the beginning of the next stressed syllable.

No rhyme either, that didn't appear as a regular feature until Chaucer, in the 14th century.
Finally the breakdown of the lines is not a requirement. There can be any number of lines in a stanza. The length can vary.

This picutre was taken courtesy of Yahoo Images.


Chapter 227
May Blooms

By Treischel


May
is here
where flowers bloom.

I
like this
season a lot.

Our
air is
filled with perfume.

Rich
colors fill
each flower pot.

Author Notes Happy May Everybody!

I love the month of May, when the leaves finally sprout and the flowers come into bloom. It is such a lovely time of year. I thought this image helps to visualize it all.

This poem is a Hay(na)ku.
The Hay(na)ku) was created by the poet Eileen Tabios. It is a variant on the Haiku, but instead of keying off of syllable count, it focuses on a simpler word count. A Hay(na)ku consists of a three-line stanza, where the first line has one word, the second line has two words, and the third line has three words. You can write just one, or chain several together into a longer poem of several stanzas. However, each stanza must be able to stand on its own.

So, this poem is actually 4 Hay(na)kus, plus I rhymed them to each other in an abab scheme. Not required.

This photograph was taken by the author himself. This flower pot was in front of a Barnes and Noble store.


Chapter 228
The Gift of Color

By Treischel



Then God looked toward the Earth,
Saw color as a need.
So, with a gentle touch,
He spread the world with seed.

Thus beauty, He decreed,
Shall cover all the land
To please the people's eye
So they might understand

That textures and the hue,
They're a God-given gift,
Direct from Him to you,
To help your spirits lift.

Then God looked toward the Earth,
Where seeds He planted by,
Were flowers in full bloom.
In bountiful supply.

His face lit with a smile.
He gazed at them awhile.


Author Notes Flowers provide such beauty and color to the world, as well as their fragrance. What a wonderful gift to the world they are. So much so that Genesis should have added a verse just for them. Maybe it would read something like this poem.

This poem is an Ampeletum.
I was introduced to it by fellow FanStorian tfawcus.
The Ampeletum was created several years ago by FanStorian JeJo. The name is derived from "ampel-" denoting vines and "-etum" meaning a grove or garden (as in Arboretum). Thus, the name signifies the way rhymes keep twisting around, coming back to life.

It consists of four stanzas with a rhyme scheme of:
Abcb, bded, fgcg, Aehe where capital A is an exact repeated line.
There are just six syllables per line and any meter can be used.

My poem is written mainly in iambic trimeter with minor variations, as was Tony's (tfawcus). I added the closing couplet in order to capture a Genesis effect - "and He saw that it was good" - type of statement.

This photograph was taken by the author in July, 2014 at a local shopping center that had many flower displays.


Chapter 229
Where the Sidewalk Breaks

By Treischel


There's a nasty place where the sidewalk breaks.
It is where my trip began.
It's there below the underpass.
It's there with all that shattered glass,
Before you reach the dormant grass.
That's where, I swear, that I ran.

Tried to miss this place where the sidewalk breaks,
And it wasn't for the smell.
It may have been the refuse sacks.
It may have been the root-pushed cracks.
It could have been the railroad tracks
That tripped me up, where I fell.

But, I'm not sure anyone really knows
What are the causes of my bloody nose,
Or basic basis of my broken toes,
At that nasty place where the sidewalk breaks.

Author Notes You could have a real trip here if you don't watch where you are going.

For this poem I chose to Parody a famous poem by Shel Silverstein, Where The Sidewalk Ends. Here it is.

Where the Sidewalk Ends by Shel Silverstein


There is a place where the sidewalk ends
And before the street begins,
And there the grass grows soft and white,
And there the sun burns crimson bright,
And there the moon-bird rests from his flight
To cool in the peppermint wind.

Let us leave this place where the smoke blows black
And the dark street winds and bends.
Past the pits where the asphalt flowers grow
We shall walk with a walk that is measured and slow,
And watch where the chalk-white arrows go
To the place where the sidewalk ends.

Yes we'll walk with a walk that is measured and slow,
And we'll go where the chalk-white arrows go,
For the children, they mark, and the children, they know
The place where the sidewalk ends.


This poem is a Parody.
A Parody (also called spoof, send-up or lampoon), in use, is a work created to imitate, make fun of, or comment on an original work, its subject, author, style, or some other target, by means of satiric or ironic imitation. According to Aristotle, Hegemon of Thasos was the inventor of a kind of parody; by slightly altering the wording in well-known poems he transformed the sublime into the ridiculous. In ancient Greek literature, a parodia was a narrative poem imitating the style and prosody of epics "but treating light, satirical or mock-heroic subjects". Source: Wikipedia.

This picture was taken by the author in March 2012, at a park along the Bruce Vento Trail in St. Paul, Minnesota.


Chapter 230
Barrack Obama

By Treischel

Barrack Obama
And the Dalai Lama
0ne lives near Siam
The other abandoned Afghanistan


Author Notes Another poetic format I just learned about as I read reviews by those in the National Poetry Month challenge, which requires a posting daily during the month of April in the required format. I'll describe it below, but I'm not surprised that the form was invented by a 16 year old who was passing satyrical comments to his classmates.

This poem is a Clerihew.
A Clerihew is a whimsical, four-line biographical poem invented by Edmund Clerihew Bentley. The first line is the name of the poem's subject, usually a famous person put in an absurd light. The rhyme scheme is AABB, and the rhymes are often forced. The line length and meter are irregular. Bentley invented the c
Clerihew in school and then popularized it in books.
A Clerihew has the following properties:
It is biographical and usually whimsical, showing the subject from an unusual point of view; it mostly pokes fun at famous people
-It has four lines of irregular length and metre (for comic effect)
-The rhyme structure is AABB; the subject matter and wording are often humorously contrived in order to achieve a rhyme, including the use of phrases in Latin, French and other non-English languages.
-The first line contains, and may consist solely of, the subject's name. According to a letter in the Spectator in the 1960s, Bentley said that a true Clerihew has to have the name "at the end of the first line", as the whole point was the skill in rhyming awkward names.

I captured these two images from Yahoo Images, then combined them here.


Chapter 231
Climb

By Treischel



Oh my! I've reached the end of my rope.
OK then, I'll grab the knot that's just above and climb,


Author Notes It takes fortitude, conditioning, and the right attitude to climb out of a bad situation. That rope goes to heaven. That's the best way to head. With faith, you'll get help along the way.

In the interest of writing all poetic formats possible, I've come across another one which I was not familiar with. So here's mine.

This poem is a Landay.
A Landay is a form of folk poetry from Afghanistan. Meant to be recited or sung aloud, and frequently anonymous. The form is a couplet (2 lines) comprised of 22 syllables. Typically, the first line has 9 syllables and the second line 13 syllables. Being short, they may still carry a bite. (One meaning of the word landay is short, poisonous snake.) It was frequently the poetry of women in Afghanistan. The Landays are a way to subvert the social code in which women are prohibited from speaking freely. Since the poems are collective and anonymous women can claim they just overhead the poems in the marketplace, not the author of them. Their very shortness makes them easily communicated verbally. Besides being scathing or satyrical, they can be spiritual, or express love, passion, anger, hate, war, history, villains, environment, cities, or mountains.

The form is usually left justified when in printed form.

This picture was taken from Yahoo Images.


Chapter 232
Biplane Sketch

By Treischel


><

When I fly
In the sky
I get High
Don't know why
But I LOVE it.

><

Author Notes Just having a little more fun with words and trying out another Calligram. Hopefully you can tell that this is a Biplane. Again, the real poem is the picture that was created in another media. I just threw in that little ditty underneath so I'd have something to put in the poem input section.

This poem is a Calligram.
A Calligram is a poem, phrase, or word in which the typeface, calligraphy or handwriting is arranged in a way that creates a visual image. The image created by the words expresses visually what the word, or words, say. In a poem, it manifests visually the theme presented by the text of the poem. Guillaume Apollinaire was a famous calligram writer and author of a book of poems called Calligrammes. His poem written in the form of the Eiffel Tower is an example of a calligram.

The image was created by the author using a WordArt program and Powerpoint. I had to use Powerpoint because I couldn't get it to work in the Word Program, I then saved it as a JPG.


Chapter 233
Heavenly Pet Food

By Treischel



God's dog
sees
deified
birdrib

Author Notes I guess any food served in Heaven would be deified, wouldn't you think?

Just having a little more word fun.
I thought hard that if God had a pet dog, what would He name him. I came up with "Saint", of course. Although, if God yelled, " Here Saint", He might get a large response up there.

This poem is a Palindrome.
A Palindrome is a word (or sentence) that reads the same backwards as forwards. So the word "Madam" is a palindrome. For a Palindrome poem you incorporate it into your poem, but do so with either sentences or words. When done as a WORD Palindrome, each line reads the same spelled backwards or forwards (although going backwards you might have to rearrange the punctuation or spacing a bit in your mind). However, in a SENTENCE Palindrome, entire words in the poem are readable forwards or backwards. This would then need to be true for the entire poem or at least each stanza in a Sentence Palindrome.

Simple example of a sentence Palindrome poem.

Life Is Good
Good Is Life

For this poem I'm doing the word version.

I took this picture from Microsoft ClipArt, but added the halo and the name.


Chapter 234
The Work Stack

By Treischel


IN
Every situation, as the stack is growing bigger,
There's a lot of information that you really need to figure
Out.



Author Notes Notrhing like a stack of stuff in the old in-basket.

This poem is an Antonym.
An Antonym Poem is a four line poem. The first line is only one word. Second and third line can be formatted as you wish. The last line is the one word antonym of the word on the first line. Words that are opposite or nearly opposite in meaning are called antonyms. Examples are big and small, or long and short.

This photograph was taken by the author of wife's in basket.


Chapter 235
Calm Down!

By Treischel






Come
To your senses
Without pretenses, or I'll
Go


Author Notes If you can't reason with someone, sometimes you just have to leave.

This poem is an Antonym.
An Antonym Poem is a four line poem. The first line is only one word. Second and third line can be formatted as you wish. The last line is the one word antonym of the word on the first line. Words that are opposite or nearly opposite in meaning are called antonyms. Examples are big and small, or long and short.

This picture is from Yahoo images


Chapter 236
Adam and Eve

By Treischel



 
 
I came upon forbidden tree,
Where serpent Satan guided me
And said, “The juices of this fruit
Provide most magical pursuit.”
 
          This apple is so red and fine.
          It’s easy to pluck off the vine.
 
He said we’d learn most wondrous things,
If we but take a single bite.
We’d feel the joy that pleasure brings,
And revel in complete delight
 
          I wonder, God said not to try,
          And ponder at His reason why.
 
The snake said, “God is holding out.”
It seems to me it isn’t right.
So Adam, please let’s take a bite,
And find out what it’s all about.
 
          Eve’s never been one to deny.
          What possibly could go awry?
 
And as each took a bite within,
Committed the Original Sin.

Author Notes And so, a simple act to disobey God's rule had consequences down to every generation ever born. Temptation brought it on, Satan smiled.

This poem is a Quatret.
A Quatret is a poetry form created by Sue Campion (sgalletti) in March 2010. It is a poem that actually consists of three poems. The first poem is a series of at least 3 Quatrains. The Quatrains should be four lines in length and contain a rhyme scheme of aabb, abab, abba, or abcb. Either iambic or anapestic meter is recommended. The second poem consists of a series of Rhyming Couplets which are interspersed between the Quatrains, with a final Rhyming Couplet at the end of the poem. This final Rhyming Couplet serves to close the poem of couplets as well as the entire poem. The Rhyming Couplets should be either indented or italicized. Each of these two poems need to make sense as separate entities. The third poem is the combination of the two poems, such that the entire poem makes sense.

This Picture is from Yahoo Images.


Chapter 237
A Sinner's Pleas

By Treischel



Angel Pray
a prayer for me today,
to guide this lost sinner on his way.
I know so well what a kind word from you will do,
because the Judge on my Judgment Day
will hear the words you say.
Angel pray!

Angel Please!
I'm here, down on my knees,
where it's so much better to appease,
and gain assistance of your angelic nature,
to grasp any help that I might sieze.
So hear my anguished pleas,
Angel please!





Author Notes A kneeling angel statue in a cemetery prompted me to write this poem, as I pondered the significance of its presence there. I then perceived that this angel will intercede for us as we go to meet our maker. This poor fellow narrates his concern.

This poem is written in Flying Saucer Format. It was created by Patricia Lawrence (our fellow FanStorian, Patcelaw) this week of May 24, 2015.
The Flying Saucer format is formed based on a syllable count of:
3,6,9,12,9,6,3.
It creates a stanza that forms the shape of a Fying Saucer, thus the name. It contains two or more stanzas. There is no requirement for either rhyme or meter.
However, I have been experimenting with various rhyme schemes that might be applied, so for this poem I chose to use rhyme. The rhyme scheme used is:
AaabaaA, where the capital letters represent repeated lines.

This photograph was taken by the author himself at Lakewood Cemetery, near Lake Calhoun in Minneapolis, MN., on May 25, 2015.


Chapter 238
Little Geese

By Treischel


Little Geese,
adorned in yellow fleece,
drift upon the pond in perfect peace,
to become new generation of grownup geese.
Tiny legs in motion never cease.
How fast their size increase,
little geese.

Swim behind,
as geese are so inclined,
with their dad and momma on their mind.
They are content to drift and play, and stay behind,
although not inclined to keep aligned.
Little geese, thus confined,
swim behind.




Author Notes Baby Geese swim behind their parents on a tranquil pond.

Mono-rhymed stanzas.
Rhyme Scheme: AaaA1aaA

Author's photograph.


Chapter 239
The Iris

By Treischel



The Iris,
called the "Rainbow" in Greek
because it comes in so many hues,
the very thought of them is most desirous.
Bouquets often wash away the blues.
Its petals are unique
and timeless.


Pick a few
To brighten any place.
Sure to please the most discerning mind.
Their petals surely glisten in the morning dew.
For gifts, they are a most precious find.
Place them in a vase.
Proudly view.

Author Notes The lovely Iris can be found in a rainbow of colors. The name is derived from the Greek, meaning "Rainbow". I spotted these recently gracing a gravestone. These beige ones are just one example. There shape is unique. It is a perenial plant. Their petals vary in shape among its many species but contain six lobes, three of which droop, or fall, making a handy landing area for insects seeking nectar or pollin. They often have veining lines or dots, as can be seen here.

This poem is in Flying Saucer Format. It was created by Patricia Lawrence (our fellow FanStorian, Patcelaw) this week of May 24, 2015.
The Flying Saucer format is formed based on a syllable count of:
3,6,9,12,9,6,3.
It creates a stanza that forms the shape of a Fying Saucer, thus the name. It contains two or more stanzas. There is no requirement for either rhyme or meter.
However, for this poem I chose to use rhyme. The rhyme scheme used is:
abcacba.

This picture was taken by the author himself on May 25, 2015.


Chapter 240
Destiny

By Treischel



Outer Space
is our final frontier,
as we dream to go to there from here.
Space might be the destiny of the Human Race,
to find a similar atmosphere
where colonies appear.
Outer Space.


Destiny,
exploring other lands,
as our space abilities expand
with fields of engineering and astronomy.
Mankind's curiosity demands
space vehicles are manned.
Destiny


Author Notes I do believe that we are destined to explore and possibly colonize space. As our capabilities grow, the time grows ever closer. I believe that God created us in his own image. Who is God, if not a creator, communicator, and curious being? He had to be curious to create the universe and us, giving us free will and intelligence. I thought the format would be good for this theme.

This poem is created in the Flying Saucer Format. It was created by Patricia Lawrence (our fellow FanStorian, Patcelaw) this week of May 24, 2015.
The Flying Saucer format is formed based on a syllable count of:
3,6,9,12,9,6,3.
It creates a stanza that forms the shape of a Fying Saucer, thus the name. It contains two or more stanzas. There is no requirement for either rhyme or meter.
However, for this poem I chose to use rhyme. The rhyme scheme used was:
AbbabbA, where the capital letters indicate repeated lines.

This picture was taken from Yahoo Images.


Chapter 241
This Tree

By Treischel



This tree
I climb so high,
I never knew I'd get
quite clearly captivated by
the idea of a needed safety net,
as I begin to question "why"
I took that stupid bet
to climb, to try
this tree.


Author Notes This is a fiction about a bet to climb up a tall pine tree.

This poem is a Rictameter.
A Rictameter is a nine-line poem based on syllable count. Each line has a specific number of syllables. The first line has two syllables, the next line has four, then six, eight and finally up to ten, and we work our way down again (8,6,4,2). The last line is the same as the first line. Ideally, if the author is careful with word selection, this will create a pleasing shape like a diamond, a top, planet or a baloon.

So the syllable count is defined as follows.

Line 1: Two syllables
Line 2: Four syllables
Line 3: Six syllables
Line 4: Eight syllables
Line 5: Ten syllables
Line 6: Eight syllables
Line 7: Six syllables
Line 8: Four syllables
Line 9: Two syllables - Same Line As First Line

There is no requirement for either rhyme or meter, but they certainly can be incorporated for an outstanding effect.

For this poem, I chose to rhyme. The rhyme scheme is: AbcbcbcbA. The capital leters represent the indentically repeated lines. The meter is iambic.

This photograph was taken by the author from his iPhone on May 5, 2015.


Chapter 242
The Temptation

By Treischel

 
 


 
The station was so busy that fine day,
As I was waiting back of silver van
Who filled his tank, and then he pulled away,
But left his wallet on the garbage can.
 
          When finders’ keepers is the common rule,
          It’s not your fault the loser is a fool.

 
I pulled ahead and parked next to the pump.
Walked over to that beckoning trash dump.
Looked through that wallet, much to my surprise,
A thousand dollars cash there met my eyes.
 
          “You really need that money”, small voice said.
          I think that voice was coming from my head.
 
My momma taught me just how I should feel.
She said, “The Bible says, THOU SHALL NOT STEAL”.
But, I thought that I found this “fair and square”,
And I believed I really need not share.
 
          “You should consider something very hard.
          He needs his license and his credit cards.”
 
My conscience, in the end, is what had won.
Returned his wallet full, ‘fore day was done.
 
 

Author Notes Always listen to your momma and your conscience. Of course the Bible teaches you what is right also, but that often comes through to you from your mother. At least, mine did. This poem is pure fiction, but a similar thing happened to me.

This poem is a Quatret.
A Quatret is a poetry form created by Sue Campion (sgalletti) in March 2010. It is a poem that actually consists of three poems. The first poem is a series of at least 3 Quatrains. The Quatrains should be four lines in length and contain a rhyme scheme of aabb, abab, abba, or abcb. Either iambic or anapestic meter is recommended. The second poem consists of a series of Rhyming Couplets which are interspersed between the Quatrains, with a final Rhyming Couplet at the end of the poem. This final Rhyming Couplet serves to close the poem of couplets as well as the entire poem. The Rhyming Couplets should be either indented or italicized. Each of these two poems need to make sense as separate entities. The third poem is the combination of the two poems, such that the entire poem makes sense.

This photograph was taken by the author himself. It's just his own wallet on the can beside his garage. It was taken today, May 20, 2015.


Chapter 243
Investing

By Treischel




The ticker ticks its ups and downs.
Enchanted by the Market's call.
Investor's fortunes rise and fall
Upon the whims of kings and clowns.

They often wear misfortune's frowns
When all their dreams fall off the Wall,
And find it isn't good for all
When Lady Luck makes daily rounds.

But, if you dabble wisely when
You need a place for funds to grow,
Your fortunes may rise up again
To please, more than you've ever been,
When guided by those men who know
Stock Market's secret stratagem.




Author Notes Ticker - Ticker Tape was the method of tracking stocks in the market for many years.
Market - The Stock Market
Wall- Wall Street

The Stock Market is no place to tread lightly. Those who rely in gut instinct, or their own guesswork, often find they have lost their money. Today, there are many analysts, newsletters, investor's programs, and other expert resources to aid in investing.

This poem is a Petrarchan Sonnet.

Italian (Petrarchan) sonnet: the most famous early sonneteer was Petrarca (known in English as Petrarch). The Sonnet was created by Giacomo da Lentini, head of the Sicilian School under Emperor Frederick II. The first ones were written in Italian. The structure of a typical Italian sonnet of this time included two parts that together formed a compact form of "argument". First, the octave (two quatrains), forms the "proposition", which describes a "problem", or "question", followed by a sestet (two tercets), which proposes a "resolution". Typically, the ninth line initiates what is called the "turn", or "volta", which signals the move from proposition to resolution. Even in sonnets that don't strictly follow the problem/resolution structure, the ninth line still often marks a "turn" by signaling a change in the tone, mood, or stance of the poem.

Later, the a-b-b-a, a-b-b-a pattern became the standard for Italian sonnets. For the closing sestet (last six lines) there were two different possibilities: c-d-e-c-d-e and c-d-c-c-d-c. In time, other variants on this rhyming scheme were introduced, such as c-d-c-d-c-d.
For this poem I chose the c-d-c-c-d-c structure.
Therefore the complete rhyme scheme for this poem is:
abab-abba-cdccdc.

The author compiled a recent series of stock market charts and created this montage.


Chapter 244
Totem Pole

By Treischel



Totem pole,
with vertically stacked shapes,
each carries a significant role,
imparted there where native sculptor's chisel scrapes
the message carved into tree trunk's soul,
no good spirit escapes
clan control.
Carved display,
whose eagle's wingspread sweeps
the air above our home's daily fray,
keep guard up there, while our precious family sleeps.
You've been firmly anchored there to stay,
In hopes your presence keeps
Evil away.
Wooden troll,
under the eagle's beak,
help our clan's virtues to all extoll
from that fine spot, there near the highest totem peak,
your learned oration is the goal,
to whom the ancients speak,
totem pole.
Sacred wood,
Protecting hopes and dreams,
There, as generations understood
the purpose placed upon your power painted beams,
to retain here only what is good,
avoiding harsh extremes,
if it could.
Totem pole
Protect us
Totem pole
Preserve us
Totem Pole
Color our lives

Author Notes Totem poles are monumental sculptures carved on poles, posts, or pillars with symbols or figures made from large trees, mostly western red cedar, by indigenous peoples of the Pacific Northwest coast of North America (northwestern United States and British Columbia). The word totem is derived from the Algonquian (most likely Ojibwe) word odoodem "his kinship group". Totem poles are not religious objects, but they do communicate important aspects of native culture. The meanings of the designs on totem poles are as varied as the cultures that make them. Many believe they are meant to greet friendly spirits and repel evil ones. Some poles celebrate cultural beliefs that may recount familiar legends, clan lineages, or notable events, while others are mostly artistic. Source: Wikipedia.

For this poem, I used a format that would yield a form similar to a totem pole by stacking several together. Then I added a six line envoi to give it a base like a tree.

This poem is written in a modified Flying Saucer format. It was created by Patricia Lawrence (our fellow FanStorian, Patcelaw) this week of May 24, 2015.
The Flying Saucer format is formed based on a syllable count of:
3,6,9,12,9,6,3.
It creates a stanza that forms the shape of a Fying Saucer, thus the name. It contains two or more stanzas. There is no requirement for either rhyme or meter.
However, for this poem I chose to use rhyme. The rhyme scheme used is:
abababa

The envoi has six lines with a syllable count of 3,3,3,3,3,4. it reads:

Totem pole
Protect us
Totem pole
Preserve us
Totem Pole
Color our lives

This picture of a totem pole was taken by the author himself at the Minnesota Science Museum in downtown St. Paul on May 23, 2015.


Chapter 245
OH Dandelion

By Treischel


Oh dandelion, golden harbinger of spring,
I keep my eye on thee! You populate my lawn.
Your lion heads appeared so suddenly one dawn,
A yellow carpet, spread for bees to feast upon.

I find thy presence here a most amazing thing.
Eradication of thy growth has been my goal.
I've poisoned, pulled, and used all kinds of weed control.
Yet still, I find entire generations whole.

And, there's a reproductive weapon that you bring.
As if your stubborn stamina were not enough,
That golden head becomes a whitened ball of fluff
That spreads its seeds, when blows a single windy puff.

Though there are many angry thoughts these weeds inspire,
It's their survival strategy I must admire.




Author Notes Although dandelions are consideres to be obnoxious weeds, you have to admire their ability to successfully survive regardless of all the efforts to eradicate them.

This poem is a Triptic Sonnet. Never heard of that? Well, that's because I just created it. At least, to the best of my knowledge and research. You see, I like poems that have triple consecutive rhymes. I feel that really brings the rhyme to life. So, I incorporated that here in this Sonnet. The name Triptic derives from the triple scheme.

A Triptic Sonnet has the usual 14 lines, consisting of three quatrains with a rhyming couplet, and a volta at line 9. What distinguishes it is the rhyme scheme and meter. The fist line of each quatrain rhyme with each other, interlinking the stanzas. The next 3 lines of the stanza all ryhme, creating a elegant echo effect. The rhyme scheme is:
abbb accc addd ee
It is written in any iambic meter. I chose iambic heptameter here (12 syllables, or 6 poetic feet).

This photograph was taken by the author himself in his own backyard on May 21, 2015.


Chapter 246
Hailezaine (eagles sitting)

By Treischel



eagle sitting with her chick
rumps get sore real quick
on a stick


Author Notes I just think those sticks can't be that comfortable. That must be why the female eagle looks so grumpy.

This poem is a Hailezaine.
A HAILEZAINE must be written in three lines.
It has the syllable count of a Quinzaine(unrhymed verse of 15 syllables divided in three lines) as 7/5/3,rhyming aaa of a Triplet and content, as well as similar syllable counts, of a Haiku. So, it is a combination of those three formats. Hai (Haiku)-le (Triplet)-zaine (Quinzaine). Fanstory had a contest on this style in 2014. Not sure who created it.

This photograph was taken of these egles in a nest at Grey Cloud Island in the Mississippi River on April 25, 2015.


Chapter 247
Do Well

By Treischel


Do well.
In what you do, do thoroughly.
Become the best that you can be.
Express your creativity.
Let deeds foretell.
Then you'll excel.
Have every given task you touch,
Exemplify the best. As such,
Appreciated very much.
To reach the top,
Don't ever stop.
Do well!


Author Notes I find that those who continue to strive to do the best usually come out on top. Here my grandson, Jeremy, is striving to do just that.

This poem is a 12 Line Exhortation.
A 12 Line Exhortation is a format that I created. It is a poem with 12 lines, starting and ending with a 2 syllable line that caries an exhortation, like; Get up!, Move on! Go jump! The whole syllable structure is:
2/8/8/8/4/4/8/8/8/4/4/2.
There is also a fixed rhyme scheme of:
AbbbaacccddA, where the capital letters are repeated lines.

I researched poetry types with 12 Lines to see what they are called. I found a group of poems called 12 Lines. But they are basically unstructured. I wanted some specific structure. I wanted a poem with 3 consecutive lines of rhyme, that played off 8/4/2 syllable counts and was positive in spirit. So I created this format and called it 12 Line Exhortation. I don't think this format previously exists, as far as I know.

This photograph was taken by the author himself in September of 2014.


Chapter 248
Find Joy

By Treischel



Find Joy!
Enjoy the finer things of life.
Reduce and minimize the strife.
The opportunities are rife
For doing well.
So cast a spell,
And see the chances that arise,
They're sitting right before your eyes --
The simple things the world supplies
When you step out,
And look about.
Find Joy!



Author Notes Yes, get out there and enjoy life.

This poem is a 12 Line Exhortation.
This poem is a 12 Line Exhortation, a format that I created. A 12 Line Exhortation is a poem with 12 lines, starting and ending with a 2 syllable line that caries an exhortation, like; Get up!, Move on! Go jump! The whole syllable structure is:
2/8/8/8/4/4/8/8/8/4/4/2.
There is also a fixed rhyme scheme of:
AbbbaacccddA, where the capital letters are repeated lines.

I researched poetry types with 12 Lines to see what they are called. I found a group of poems called 12 Lines. But they are basically unstructured. I wanted some specific structure. I wanted a poem with 3 consecutive lines of rhyme, that played off 8/4/2 syllable counts and was positive in spirit. So I created this format and called it 12 Line Exhortation. I don't think this format previously exists, as far as I know.

This photograph was taken by the author himself diuring a scarecrow exhibit at the Minnesota Arboretum located in Chanhassen, on Octrober 16, 2014.


Chapter 249
Novocaine

By Treischel


Novocaine,
Sends signals to the brain.
A trait dentists use to constrain
Pain.


Author Notes Actually, the opposite of pain is pleasure, but what a pleasure to go to the dentist and not have pain. So, although I may be stretching the definition of antonym a bit, it's not totally incorrect. Novocaine fights pain.

This poem is an Antonym Poem.
An Antonym Poem is a four line poem. The first line is only one word. Second and third line can be formatted as you wish. The last line is the one word antonym of the word on the first line. Words that are opposite or nearly opposite in meaning are called antonyms. Examples are big and small, or long and short. Rhyme is not required, but for this poem, i did rhyme. In fact, I rhymed all 4 lines.

This picture is from Yahoo images.


Chapter 250
Leaf Cascade

By Treischel



So often Mother Nature makes a spot
That paints a place in several shades of green,
In hidden glades whose shades create a scene
That whispers in its silence, "so serene".

These are the treasures valued quite a lot,
By those whose intuition really knows,
The beauty locked within those stately rows
Of trees that grow supreme where water flows.

But you may search forever, yet cannot,
Find solitude the likes that Nature made.
As here, this weeping willow's leaf cascade
Makes waterfalls of foliage furnish shade.

This tall tableau of trees, of which I'm fond,
Stands here beside this quiet little pond.

Author Notes I love how weeping willows overflow in cascades of narrow leaves that droop to the water. This scene of a pond in Minneapolis is a typical example. Who could not be inspired? I love the birch trees here too.

A Triptic Sonnet has the usual 14 lines, consisting of three quatrains with a rhyming couplet, and a volta at line 9. What distinguishes it is the rhyme scheme and meter. The fist line of each quatrain rhyme with each other, interlinking the stanzas in three first line rhymes. The next 3 lines of the stanza all ryhme, creating a elegant echo effect. So, we have three first line rhymes, and three lines of each stanza that rhyme too. Thus the "Triptic" designation. Therefore, the rhyme scheme is:
abbb accc addd ee
It is written in an iambic meter. I chose iambic pentameter here (10 syllables, or 5 poetic feet).

This photograph was taken by the author on May 25, 2015.


Chapter 251
Gravestone

By Treischel


A gravestone marks the spot
of lost loved ones,
who have gone too soon.

A permanent marker
of impermanent life lived,
but has now gone on.

A stone reminder,
that once upon a time,
they touched our lives.

A place marked to gather,
to recollect the memories,
and to pray for them.

A tombstone in a cemetery
where the family plot is,
gathering souls together.

The solid signpost,
pointing out the presence
of ultimate eternity.


Author Notes This is my family's plot at Resurection Cemetery in Mendota Heights, Minnesota. My eventual resting place is next to the backgound flowers, just to the right of it. In front of the stone lie: my mother, brother, and uncle. Behind it are: another uncle, his wife and daughter (a cousin).

This poem is a Triversen, which I was introduced to by tfawcus, a fellow FanStorian, when I reviewed his poem, Obsidian.

The Triversen was developed by William Carlos Williams. I would consider it a structured subcategory of freeverse. Here are the rules.
a. Each stanza is one sentence.
b. Each sentence/stanza breaks into 3 lines (each line is a separate phrase in the sentence).
c. Each line contains between one and four strong stresses.
d. The poem as a whole adds up to 18 lines (or 6 stanzas).
e. The lines do not employ rhyme.

The photograph was taken by the author himself on May 25,2015.


Chapter 252
Vintage Car

By Treischel

My heart beats strong, when comes along, a vintage car.
My mind, my eyes, are mesmerized by its sleek style.
Most certainly, I long to be behind its wheel,
But tends to be beyond reality, by far,
Since cost exceeds my meager budget by a mile.
So, I'll suppress this big excitement that I feel.

But oh how I'd, just once, love to be blessed to feel
The treat of driver's seat within a classic car,
As it moves down the open highway mile by mile,
Expressing bygone days in its own vintage style,
While its fine V8 engine travels near and far,
And calf-skin leather gloves might grip the steering wheel.

With brightest shine of polished chrome on each car wheel
The white-wall strips on them give real dynamic feel.
Its two-tone paint and characteristic looks go far
To lend a sleek and chic uniqueness to the car.
Detroit's modern sculpture of solid iron style
Makes a moving statement on each and every mile.

Its tooled white leather seats give looks that go a mile
To lend an air that's debonair behind the wheel,
A most essential option, made to ride in style.
When top is down, it's meant to give an open feel
Of a magnificent, romantic motor car --
A rich, substantial vehicle that takes you far.

It's just the most exciting thing I've seen so far.
Although it burns up gas in tank loads by the mile,
I wish that I could still afford to own that car.
I'd gladly jump inside, and love to grab the wheel.
It's very fun to just imagine how I'd feel
To cruise about while traveling in classic style.

Of course, my friends would laugh and say it's not my style.
I need not to pretend to wealth, or go this far,
To be accepted by my friends, or just to feel
Worthwhile, because they know I'd go an extra mile
To help a friend. It doesn't take a fancy wheel
or buy some happiness, because I have a car.

It's still a thrill, by far, to see a vintage car
And to imagine every mile in classic style,
Or dream about how it might feel behind the wheel.


Author Notes I spotted this vintage black and white Buick Electra in a parking lot and had to take its picture. I love to look at classic cars from the 1912's through the 1960's. They just don't make them like that any more. The nostalgia is palpable.

This poem is a Sestina.
A Sestina poem repeats words throughout the poem. The line-ending words are repeated in the stanzas that follow using a specific rotating order.
A sestina has six 6-line stanzas. The last stanza has a 3-line "envoi" which incorporates all the line-ending words, some hidden inside the lines. So, there are six formatted sestets and a closing tercet.

The pattern for the traditional Sestina with the 6 line-ending words is shown below, where the numbers represent the chosen repeating words. The words don't need to rhyme, but they may. The poem can be written in any meter of lines, with iambic the most common.

1st stanza 1 2 3 4 5 6
2nd stanza 6 1 5 2 4 3
3rd stanza 3 6 4 1 2 5
4th stanza 5 3 2 6 1 4
5th stanza 4 5 1 3 6 2
6th stanza 2 4 6 5 3 1
Final Envoi stanza 2--5 4--3 6--1 or any combination of two of the words per line.

For this poem I chose the following words: 1-Car, 2-Style, 3-Wheel, 4-Far, 5-Mile, 6-feel. The meter is iambic hexameter (12 syllables, or 6 poetic feet).

The picture was taken by the author himself in September, 2014.


Chapter 253
My Shadow

By Treischel


My shadow is a funny friend.
I've come to learn its quirky ways.
Sometimes it's trailing my back end,
But only shows on sunny days.

I've come to learn its quirky ways.
It always seems to follow me,
But only shows on sunny days.
It hides when near a shady tree.

It always seems to follow me,
Sometimes it's short, sometimes it's long.
It hides when near a shady tree.
I'm happy when it tags along.

Sometimes it's short, sometimes it's long.
Sometimes it's trailing my back end.
I'm happy when it tags along.
My shadow is a funny friend.


Author Notes Just some shadow thoughts. I captured this shot of my wife walking ahead of me on a sunny winter morning, when the shadows were long.

This poem is a Pantoum.
A Pantoum is a poem that is made up of quatrains with interweaving repeated lines. It is composed of a series of at least 4 quatrains; the second and fourth lines of each stanza are repeated as the first and third lines of the next. This pattern continues for any number of stanzas, except for the final stanza, which differs in the repeating pattern. The first and third lines of the last stanza are the second and fourth of the penultimate; the first line of the poem is the last line of the final stanza, and the third line of the first stanza is the second of the final.

Ideally, the meaning of lines shifts when they are repeated although the words remain exactly the same. So, although they are the same words, their meaning is changed. this gives the poem it's intrinsic beauty.

A four-stanza Pantoum is common, (although more may be used) and in the final stanza, you could simply repeat lines one and three from the first stanza, or write new lines.

The Pantoum outline is as follows:
Stanza 1: A1, B1, A2, B2
Stanza 2: B1, C1, B2, C2
Stanza 3: C1, D1, C2, D2
Stanza 4: D1, A2, D2, A1

Although it sounds complicated, the Pantoum is really one of the simplest poems to write, because of all the repeats. Here's how to go about it. First, get a sheet of lined paper. Then write the pattern down the left hand column of the sheet, with A1 on the first line, B1 on the second, A2 on the third, B2 on the fourth, and so on for each stanza. Now write your first abab rhyming stanza. Then take the first line and make it the last line of the poem. Take the third line and copy it as the second line of the last stanza. After that, take the second and fourth lines and make them the first and third lines of the second stanza. Then all you have to do is write two new lines in the second stanza, that become the first and third of the next, and so on. So your really only writing two new lines per stanza, and not even that for the last stanza. Think of it. For a 16 line poem, you really only write 8 lines. The trick is making them blend together well.

This picture was taken by the author himself in January, 2012, at Battle Creek Park in Maplewood, Minnesota.


Chapter 254
Robin a Bobbin'

By Treischel


Robin
Orange Chested
Flittering on the ground
Forever searchin', head bobbin'
Worms found

Author Notes I'm sure you see them in the yard bobbing their heads into the grass in search of worms. It's a pretty common sight.

This poem is a Cinquain.
A Cinquain is a five line poem. The format, inspired by Adelaide Crapsey in 1915, has a fixed syllable count of: 2,4,6,8,2. Rhyming is optional.

I did a bit of rhyme on this one.
I counted the word -orange- correctly this time as 2 syllables.

This photograph was taken by the author himself on April 12, 2012.


Chapter 255
Worms

By Treischel


WORMS
Slender slugs
Twisting, turning, squirming
Put them on hooks
Bait




Author Notes A Fisherman's delight - the worm.

This poem is a Didactic Cinquain.
A Cinquain is a poem of five lines, usually in a fixed structure that keys off of syllable count. The Didactic Cinquain focuses on word count instead. So the structured word count is: 1,2,3,4,1. In addition, the Didactic uses a set protocol.
Ordinarily, the first line is a one-word title, the subject of the poem; the second line is a pair of adjectives describing that title; the third line is a three-word phrase that gives more information about the subject (often a list of three gerunds, or -ing words); the fourth line consists of four words describing feelings related to that subject; and the fifth line is a single word synonym or other reference for the subject from line one. This is the form of the Cinquain usually taught to school children.

This picture is from Yahoo Images.


Chapter 256
Sharing Shoreline

By Treischel



Fishing!
Shoreline sharing, fishline staring,
Bobbers bobbing in time,
With baited hooks.
So Fine!


Author Notes When your're out fishing and sharing shoreline, it seems you spend most of the time watching the fishline and bobbers, rather than catching fish. You don't want to cross your lines, or miss a fish. Of course, it's great when you finally catch one. This is the last of the poems related to my Father's Day fishing excursion.

This poem is a Reverse Cinquain.
A Cinquain is a five line poem. The format, inspired by Adelaide Crapsey in 1915, has a fixed syllable count of: 2,4,6,8,2. Rhyming is optional.
A Reverse Cinquain has the opposite syllable count of: 2,8,6,4,2.

This photograph was taken by the author himself of is Son-in-law, Jeremy, and grandson, Jeremy, on June 21, 2015.


Chapter 257
Bright Wings

By Treischel



Bright wings,
colorful things,
beautiful butterflies,
take to the early morning skies
to seek
all the flowers that fill the fields,
for nectar their cups yield,
as nature brings
these things.


Author Notes This butterfly is a Spotted Monarch that I captured photographically on this lovely flowering plant during a walk around Lake Phalen in St. Paul, Minnesota.

This Poem is a Butterfly Cinquain.
I realized that I meantioned that I wrote a Butterfly Cinquain, but I actually forgot to post it. So, here is this omitted format of my Cinquain series.
The Butterfly Cinquain takes two 5 line Cinquains, with a syllable count of 2,4,6,8,2, and joins them together, by linking the last to syllables of the first to the first two of the second Cinquain, to form a single 9 line poem (because they both share 1 link) that makes a butterfly pattern. A lovely result.

This photograph was taken by the author himself on May 18, 2012.


Chapter 258
The Owl

By Treischel




Hoo Hoo!
The nighttime hoot
Sounds out from the forest,
A familiar owl sound that says,
"Hello".

But OH,

That haunting sound,
To creatures on the ground,
Sends a message that makes them say,
"Oh No!"

Beware,
Owl's laser stare,

That pierces darkest air
Can make the hunted everywhere
Despair.

Its wings,
Unleashed in flight,
So silent in deep night,

Spells danger to unwary souls.
Poor things!

To us,
Hoots are soothing,
Eloquent and moving.
Be glad when owl is focused on --

Not you.

Hoo Hoo,
That haunting sound
That pierces darkest air
Spells danger to unwary souls.
Not you.

 

Author Notes I often find the night sound of an Owl hooting to be soothing. Like the sound of the Loon, hearing it brings me a conjunction with nature, a familiar night sound that says the woods are alive with life. But, have you ever considered what that sound might mean to the little creatues of the woods, who are out and about at night? That is the inspiration for this poem.

This poem is a Garland Cinquain.
A Cinquain is a five line poem. The format, inspired by Adelaide Crapsey in 1915, has a fixed syllable count of: 2,4,6,8,2. Rhyming is optional.
A Garland Cinquain is a sequence of 5 Cinquains making stanzas, followed by a sixth Cinquain made up of fixed segments from the previous stanzas, typically line one from stanza one, line two from stanza two, and so on. So, if I represent the five lines 1,2,3,4,and 5 as a,b,c,d,e, and use capitals to show the repeated lines, the sequence would look like this:
Abcde aBcde abCde abcDe abcdE ABCDE.

So, the lines intertwine like garland and give an effect like other repeating poems.

For this poem I chose to use a mixture of rhying combinations and non-rhyme, just because I wanted to.

This photograph was taken by the author himself at Fort Snelling State Park along the Mississippi River bottoms in September, 2012.


Chapter 259
Imagination Spawned

By Treischel



A gift - to travel visions of the mind,
Imagining all things of every kind,
To travel to the most exotic places,
Encountering hosts of alien faces,
Or following paths of those who left traces,
Uncovering the truths yet undefined.

Uncommon things the mind has just divined,
The likes of visions yet to be refined,
Until they've gone and touched a sensing soul,
Or met the challenge of a leading role
That was so tense emotions lost control,
Then, only then, have particles aligned.

For that is what the Masters all desire --
Achievement touched by blessed inspiration,
With extraordinary mood elation,
The likes the Grecian gods would oft' admire.

These geniuses of yesterday's empires,
Who dreamed and brought about civilization,
With such a gifted strong imagination,
Are those whose spark lit ancient worlds on fire.



Author Notes Imagination is the spark that drives creation and inspiration. It kick-started civilization, and nutures my muse. So here is a compilation of those thoughts.

I am embarking on an adventure of writing various Sonnet styles. I just completed a classic Shakspearean Sonnet. So now, I thought I'd introduce a variation spawned from the Imagination of the famous poet, Dante, who wrote The Inferno.

This poem is Dante's Variation of Sonnets.
The most common Italian Sonnets are written in the Petrarchan format of a 14 line set consisting of two quatrains with two closing tercets having the rhyme scheme: abba abba cdc cdc. Dante wrote a 20 line deviation to this style. Most Sonnets in Dante's La Vita Nuova are Petrarchan. Chapter VII gives sonnet "O voi che per la via", with two sestets (aabaab aabaab ) and two quatrains (cddc cddc), and Ch. VIII, "Morte villana", with two sestets (aabbba aabbba) and two quatrains (cddc cddc).
I've am recreating his variation using the aabbba form of Chapter VIII In iambic pentameter, (but lines 3,4.5, 14,15, 18, and 19 are intentionally feminine). I chose that because, I personally like 3 consecutive repeated lines. So this intrigued me when I read about it.

This picture is me, taken with a warping app.



Chapter 260
This Golden Hour

By Treischel



The Golden hour is a magical time.
It comes at dusk, near the end of the day,
Where shadows all grow longer as they play
In mystical moments, so sweet, sublime,
As rays of sunshine softly reach decline,
They set a golden glow upon the bay.
The golden hour, as photographers say,
Is just the perfect time, when light is prime.

So then, I sought out this magical place,
To see myself whether those tales were true,
And searched about for such a special space
Where Midas' touch had left his golden trace.
Became impressed, as my amazement grew
From glorious sight in golden embrace.

Author Notes Any photographer can tell you that the best time to take photographs is about an hour before sunset, when the sun is still bright and the shadows are long. That time is known as the Golden Hour. I tried to capture that here in this photograph and in my poetic verse. This bay is on the Mississippi River just across from the downtown area of St. Paul, Minnesota.

This poem is a Petrrarchan Sonnet.
The Petrarchan Sonnet is also known as the Italian Sonnet. The most famous early sonneteer was Petrarca (known in English as Petrarch). The Sonnet was created by Giacomo da Lentini, head of the Sicilian School under Emperor Frederick II. The first ones were written in Italian. The structure of a typical Italian sonnet of this time included two parts that together formed a compact form of "argument". First, the octave (two quatrains), forms the "proposition", which describes a "problem", or "question", followed by a sextet (two tercets), which proposes a "resolution". Typically, the ninth line initiates what is called the "turn", or "volta", which signals the move from proposition to resolution. Even in sonnets that don't strictly follow the problem/resolution structure, the ninth line still often marks a "turn" by signaling a change in the tone, mood, or stance of the poem.

Later, the a-b-b-a, a-b-b-a pattern became the standard for all Italian sonnets. For the closing sextet (last six lines) there were two different possibilities: c-d-e-c-d-e and c-d-c-c-d-c. In time, other variants on this rhyming scheme were introduced, such as c-d-c-d-c-d.

For this poem I chose the c-d-c c-d-c structure.
Therefore the complete rhyme scheme for this poem is:
abababba-cdccdc.

This photograph was taken by the author himself on January 8, 2012.


Chapter 261
Simple Decorations

By Treischel



Granny's decorations were so simple,
With something like a common china plate
Garnering emotions they would kindle,
Of welcome that such simple things create.

She'd frame it with a hand-embroidered towel
A cloth that she's spent hours on to make,
Creating her own cozy cover cowl
That blends to form a beautiful keepsake.

Oh, how I miss my grandma's gentle touch,
Her smiles and all her warm embracing hugs.
These days I seem to miss her very much,
With simple things providing memory tugs.

When china plates are placed upon a wall,
My grandma's home is what my thoughts recall.


Author Notes It is amazing to me how some objects get associated with memories. In this case, whenever I see a plate on a wall for decoration, it reminds me of my grandmother. She died when I was 10 years old. I have vivid memories of her funeral, because her death really devastated me. I missed her loving ways, when we would visit her. She always had smiles, hugs, kisses, candy, and homemade pie. This plate is actually in my brother's house, but it reminds me of her every time I see it.

This poem is an English Sonnet.
When English Sonnets were introduced by Thomas Wyatt in the early 16th century, his sonnets and those of his contemporary, Henry Howard, the Earl of Surrey were chiefly translations from the Italian of Petrarch. While Wyatt introduced the sonnet into English, it was Surrey who gave it a rhyming meter, and a structural division into quatrains of a kind that now characterizes the typical English sonnet. The form consists of fourteen lines structured as 3 quatrains and a couplet. The third quatrain generally introduces an unexpected sharp thematic or imagistic "turn", the volta. In Shakespeare's sonnets, however, the volta usually comes in the couplet, and usually summarizes the theme of the poem or introduces a fresh new look at the theme. With only a rare exception, the meter is iambic pentameter, although there is some accepted metrical flexibility (e.g., lines ending with an extra-syllable feminine rhyme, or a trochaic foot rather than an iamb, particularly at the beginning of a line). The usual rhyme scheme is end-rhymed as:
a-b-a-b, c-d-c-d, e-f-e-f, g-g.

For this poem I did employ a trochaic pentameter in line 1 and 3, as well as a feminine line in line 5.

This picture was taken by the author himself on May 29, 2011.


Chapter 262
Sunny Day Play

By Treischel



There are so many ways to play
On delightful, warm, and sunny day.

It may be on a sandy beach
Where sunlight turns a body tan,
Or in the water's cooling reach,
To splash and swim the best you can,

Or maybe it's a playground slide
That seems to draw the summer's child
With promise of a swing or glide,
That keeps them happy and beguiled.

But it's the cooling shade, I say,
Where breezes gently kiss the skin,
On fresh cut grass I wallow in,
That yields the peace for which I pray.



Author Notes A typical sunny summer day is depicted here. I wrote this poem with this picture specifically in mind. The scene has a swimming beach, picnic area, and playground in the background. But what is in the foreground, but a quiet shaded area under a tree? Now that's for me! The spot is at Carver Lake in Woodbury, Minnesota.

This poem is an Inverted Sonnet.
An Inverted Sonnet is one what is known as the Modern Sonnets. Modern Sonnets, however, don't necessarily follow the same rules as more traditional Sonnets. While there were once strict rules about how many lines could be in a Sonnet, how many syllables had to be in every line, and the rhyme scheme the Sonnet had to follow, the writers of Modern Sonnets have much more freedom when it comes to structure and rhyme. It can be difficult to distinguish different types of Modern Sonnets because the purpose of the modern poetry writers who write these types of poems is often to break the rules. In fact, Modern Sonnets have a lot in common with Free Form, also known as Free Verse, poetry. However, while similar to Free Form poetry in many ways, Modern Sonnets tend to have a bit more structure and will have certain characteristics that will classify it as a Sonnet.

One specific type of Modern Sonnet, most famously penned by Elizabeth Bishop, is the Inverted Sonnet. While the traditional Sonnet is classified as having exactly 14 lines and a strict rhyming scheme, an Inverted Sonnet will have 14 lines with an opening rhyming couplet rather than a closing couplet found in traditional Sonnets. It may even start with an opening couplet, but the remaining lines could be written in free form. A Sonnet that's been split in half, with each section having its own tone and style, might also be referred to as an Inverted Sonnet. The meter and line length may vary in this format. Source: The wiseGEEK and Wikipedia.

For this poem I used iambic tetrameter. I also structured the rhyme scheme so that the rhyme of the opening couplet blended into an abba type enveloping scheme in the last stanza. But that is not a requirement. So, for this poem, the rhyme scheme is:
aa bcbc dede agga,

where a traditional Sonnet rhyme scheme would be:
abab cdcd efef gg

This phothgraph was taken by the author himself on August 19, 2011.


Chapter 263
Yellow Lilies

By Treischel



These lilies add their golden glow
Wherever their bright petals show.
Their stamens lift to taste the air.
as petals open wide to share
The pollen with the bugs and bees.
Their bulbous roots can help appease
The culinary Asian taste.
They look delightful in a vase.
But, lily colors we most prize,
Delighting visions in our eyes.
That's why we love to cultivate
Them, for the mood that they create.

These lilies add their golden glow
Wherever their bright petals show.



Author Notes These yellow lilies are in my brother Richard's back yard. They were so vibrant that I just had to photograph them. In the poem I made reference to the fact that, in Asia, they eat the roots as a vegetable. A yellow lily usually represents joy or gaeity. They are the flower of the 40th anniversary.

This is a Couplet Sonnet.
A Couplet Sonnet is made up of 7 rhyming couplets. The unique feature is that the first two lines are also the last two lines, so the rhyme scheme is:
AAbbccddeeff AA, where the capital letters indicate the repeated lines. I did this one in iambic tetrameter.

This photograph was taken by the author himself on Saturday, July 11, 2015, at my brother, Richard, and his wife, Corinne's, 40th Anniversery party.


Chapter 264
Sacrificial Savior

By Treischel


When I contemplate reflection
On the evils of mankind,
There is only one direction

Where we are headed, that I find.
Its location isn't pleasant,
And it's really quite confined,

For the demons that are present
Are so destructively obsessed,
And their tortures are incessant.

But be glad that we've been blessed
With a sacrificial Savior,
Who keeps Satan's work depressed.

For no act of love was braver,
When He died for our behavior.




Author Notes What a wonderful act of love for mankind. The amazing thing is, that he knew exactly what was coming when he endured the Agony in the Garden. This garden was far removed from Adam and Eve's, yet so intimately connected.

This is a painting that I did when I was 10 years old. It is a Paint by Numbers activity, done on black felt. It has became a Family heirloom.

This is a Terza Rima Sonnet.
A Terza rima is a rhyming verse stanza form that consists of an interlocking three-line rhyme scheme. It was first used by the Italian poet Dante Alighieri, who wrote The Inferno. The literal translation of terza rima from Italian is 'third rhyme'. Terza rima is a three-line stanza using chain rhyme in the pattern A-B-A, B-C-B, C-D-C, D-E-D. There is no limit to the number of lines, but poems or sections of poems written in terza rima end with either a single line or couplet repeating the rhyme of the middle line of the final tercet. The two possible endings for the example above are d-e-d, e or d-e-d, e-e. There is no set rhythm for terza rima, but in English, iambic pentameter is generally preferred. So, a Terza Rima Sonnet combines that rhyme pattern in 4 stanzas of 3 lines each, using the couplet option to create the signature 14 lines of a Sonnet.

This photograph was taken by the author himself.


Chapter 265
Bewildering Change

By Treischel



What wonders lie within thy wayward mind,
That oft' escape the conscripts of our peace,
To dally in the dredges of despair,
Where demon-dealt cruel tortures never cease.

For once you were a maiden full of joy,
Whose laughter lifted spirits in this place,
Who wasted nary moments to employ
Your best God-given gifts of charm and grace.

But lo, such lofty sentiments have gone,
And left behind a soul without a stitch
Of former fabled qualities upon
Which love abounds, to make a poor life rich.

Alas, these hidden traits I didn't know,
They please me not, my dear. So I must go.



Author Notes Have you ever been bewildered by the change in a person once you have committed to them. I think many married people have. This poem is inspired by my first wife, the ex-wife.

This picture is one of the author's own creation.


Chapter 266
Sonnet Compilation

By Treischel

I hope you have enjoyed my travels into the world of the Sonnet. I just updated this list as I added another 27 different Sonnet formats since I last listed them. If you've been following, it should be apparent how flexible, yet beautiful, a style of poetry it is. Due the past several weeks, I've written Sonnets in 46 different formats. If you missed them, here are the titles, format, and dates posted.

Bewildering Change.......................A Shakespearean Sonnet.............July 06,2015
Imagination Spawned....................Dante's Variation Sonnet..............July 06,2015
The Golden Hour...........................A Petrarchan Sonnet.......................July 07,2015
Summer's Day Play.......................An Inverted Sonnet..........................July 09,2015
Bridge Knowledge.........................A Spenserian Sonnet......................July 10,2015
Simple Decorations.......................An English Sonnet...........................July 11,2015
The Verdant Pond.........................A Rubyiat Sonnet.............................July 12,2015
Yellow Lilies...................................A Couplet Sonnet............................July 14,2015
Wander With a Friend....................A Sestet Sonnet...............................July 14,2015
Sacrificial Savior............................A Terza Rima Sonnet......................July 15,2015
Pink Ladies....................................A Pantoum Sonnet...........................July 16,2015
Thoughts to Ponder........................A Tricet Sonnet..............................July 19,2015
Night Revelations............................A Blank Verse Sonnet....................July 19,2015
Grovin'.............................................A Jazz Sonnet.................................July 20,2015
Cash.................................................Fusion Sonnet................................July 21,2015
Humanity.........................................Fusion Sonnet................................Aug 02,2015
Time................................................Shadow Sonnet..............................Aug 02,2015
Haiku(bright decoration)................Haiku Sonnet.................................Aug 03,2015
Geese at Pease................................Tory Hexatet Sonnet.....................Aug 03,2015
Exploring Cliff Cave........................Hidden Rhyme Sonnet..................Aug 04,2015
Enjoy the Fire..................................Tirrell Sonnet.................................Aug 05,2015
Tree Top Thoughts.........................A Slide Sonnet...............................Aug 07,2015
Water Garden..................................Sapphic Sonnet..............................Aug 09,2015
The Debate......................................Limerick Sonnet............................Aug 09,2015
Best Buddy.......................................Pushkin Sonnet - Italian................Aug 10,2015
Minnesota Capital Building.............Saraband Sonnet...........................Aug 11,2015
The Spot...........................................Free Style Sonnet..........................Aug 12,2015
Golf Course Sign..............................Sestina Sonnet...............................Aug 12,2015
Skurrying Squirrels..........................Pushkin Sonnet - English...............Aug 13,2015
Bumble Bees....................................Asean Sonnet.................................Aug 16,2015
Time to Play.....................................Bey Morlin Sonnet.........................Aug 19,2015
When your Love Is............................Acrostic Sonnet.............................Aug 19,2015
Little People.....................................Byron's Sonnet...............................Aug 20,2015
Fountain with Fastia.........................Cornish Sonnet..............................Aug 23,2015
Washburn Water Tower....................Roserian Sonnet............................Aug 24,2015
Dahlia Bloom....................................Quatern Sonnet.............................Aug 24,2015
Sidewalk Adorned............................Rondel Prime Sonnet.....................Aug 25,2015
Turning Two......................................Swannet Sonnet.............................Aug 26,2015
Fall, The Best.....................................Duo Sonnet....................................Sept 04,2015
Computer Industry Genesis...............Super Sonnet.................................Sept 05,2015
Spellbound.........................................Hex Sonnetta.................................Sept 13,2015
The Yellow Mountains of China.........Heroic Sonnet................................Sept 13,2015


Also Earlier:
Leaf Cascade...................................A Triptic Sonnet..................................June 8,2015
Meet................................................A Word Sonnet..................................March19,2015
My Temperature is Rising...............A Carret Sonnet................................March 3,2015
Early Minnesota Explorers.........Crown of Heroic sonnets.........................June 6,2015

Author Notes These will all be posted in a book called "Little Poems" in my portfolio. Just sort of acknowledging the effort here.


Chapter 267
Groovin'

By Treischel



When those virtuoso instruments all play
Discordant notes in syncopation,
The elements of Jazz, done in such a way,
Create elation.


Accompanied by piano and the drums,
The saxophone is wailing melancholy rhythmic sounds,
That is countered by blues guitar's pulsin', squealin' rounds -
Two pop melodies compete.


Ramblin' rhythm comes cascading to your feet
As improvisation comes
Got its beat, got its heat, its got soul.
Tap your feet, feeling sweet, lose control.


So much pizzazz,
Because it's Jazz

Author Notes It took some time to lay this one out, as Jazz has unique elements. Jazz is a very complex musical genre. Because of its improvised nature, with multiple melodies and rhythms working together, listeners accustomed to more structured, predictable forms of music might find Jazz difficult to follow. The same is true for the Jazz Sonnet. It tends to break many Sonnet rules. Jazz ensembles, which can have two to 20 players, range in style, size and instrumentation, but they are all united by three basic elements: improvisation, syncopation and blue notes. These traits must translate to the poetry then, in rhyme, rythmn, and meter. Also, a Jazz poem must be about the music. From the very beginning, Jazz has been about freedom, movement and individual expression. Its break from musical tradition and emphasis on improvisation and innovation set it up as the backdrop to cultural changes. So here is my interpretation of a Jazz Sonnet.

This is a Jazz Sonnet.
A Jazz Sonnet has the familiar layout of a traditional Sonnet with its first 12 lines seperated into 3 Quatrains and a closing rhymed couplet. However, none of the lines in the stanzas have an even syllable count, making iambic verse difficult. This promotes discordance (blue notes?). But there is rhyme, it's just not what you'd typically find. You'll see elements that play against each other, while others blend. Afterall, Jazz sought to be different. Each Jazz Sonnet is unique in style, meter, and rhyme. So be creative.

For this poem the syllable count is:
11,9,11,5-- 11,13,13, 7--11,7,9,9--4,4
The rhyme scheme is:
abab cdde ecff gg

This picture is from Yahoo Images.


Chapter 268
Night's Revelations

By Treischel


So often I'll go walking in the dark.
To listen to the rhythms of the night,
Without the blind distractions of the day.
The only light produced by moon and stars.

The moon will cast its glow upon the path,
And pull the waves that crash upon the shore.
I watch the twinkling sky put on a show
And hear the breeze blow gently in the trees.

For then, is when I feel it once again,
The pulse of something vital that's in me.
I sense the vastness of the universe,
That sends mysterious vibrations out.

I have a sudden sense of feeling small
But part of it, all in some mystic way.

Author Notes There is nothing like the night sky to make you feel the immensity of the Universe. A walk through the woods, or along the beach, increases that cosmic connection.

This Poem is a Blank Verse Sonnet.
A Blank Verse Sonnet is written without a rhyme scheme (and definitely no end-line rhyme), but with iambic pentameter in the traditional 3 quatrain and closing couplet format of a Sonnet.

This picture was taken by the Author himself on June 10, 2013, at Powers Lake in Woodbury, Minnesota.


Chapter 269
Some Thoughts to Ponder

By Treischel

What in reality
Gives life vitality,
Or its finality?

Often there's ecstasy,
Sometimes malignancy.
Is it just fantasy?

When there is agony,
There is no harmony.
That is the irony!

It's to heaven I pray
To make THIS a fine day,
Keep the evil away.

Inner peace can be found.
Then our JOY will abound!


Author Notes Just pondering.

This Poem is a Tricet Sonnet.
Never heard of that? Well, that's because I just created it. At least, to the best of my knowledge and research. You see, I like poems that have triple consecutive rhymes. I feel that really brings the rhyme to life. So, I incorporated that here in this Sonnet. The name Tricet derives from the triple-rhymed tercet (tri-cet).

A Tricet Sonnet has the usual 14 lines, but consists of four tercets with a rhyming couplet, and a volta at line 10. The lines of each of the tercets mono-rhyme. The rhyme scheme is:
aaa bbb ccc ddd ee
It is written in Dactylic dimeter. A dactyl is a meter with a hard stress followed by two soft stresses. This poem repeats it twice in each line.

This photograph is a selfie taken by the author himself, then modified to create the effect. It was taken April 22, 2013, but modified today.



Chapter 270
Wander With a Friend

By Treischel



At the end of the day that's forever,
When the weight of the world feels so heavy,
On the edge of the night you may wander,
In the hope to release day's endeavors
You may meet with a friend at the levee
And discuss what philosophers ponder.

For the path may be dark that you travel,
But a pal and her dog, prancing along,
Make it easy to see when shared with three,
That the knots of the day may unravel
That's because they just shouldn't belong,
And with them you become more carefree.

There is nothing better than evening time walks
With a frisky dog and with friendly talks.



Author Notes I took this picture along a pathway just before nightfall, but just moments prior to when the walkway lights came on. These are two strangers that I captured at that monment. I liked the effect, and pondered what they might be discussing. I also liked the joy the dog's body language portrayed. That's my inspiration here.

I wrote this in a bit of a different cadence to imitate the rhyme scheme of abcabc. Instead of iambic, I used the more waltz-like meter of anapestic. So, instead of a marching da Dum da Dum of the iamb, I have a more skip-like da da Dum, da da Dum here.

This poem is a Sestet Sonnet.
A Sestet Sonnet still has the 14 lines, like the traditional Sonnet, but instead of the first 12 being done in 3 Quatrains (4 line stanzas), this format uses 2 Sestets (6 line stanzas). Both forms close with a rhyming couplet. The rhyme scheme of a sestet Sonnet is:
abcabc cdecde ff.
With the rhymes spaced a little further apart, they are a bit more subtle. Some think this adds to the elequence of the format.
It is written in an anapestic meter. Anapest consists of three syllables where the first two are unstressed and the last one is stressed. I blended it into a 10 syllable line.

This picture was taken by the author himself on January 19, 2013.


Chapter 271
Bridge Knowledge

By Treischel



I wonder at wide water's engineers,
With skillful knowledge of long span techniques,
That settle steel or stone on several piers
Creating mighty structures, quite unique,
That bridge across a river or a creek.
They oft' display the useful Roman arch.
Their methods bear a measure of mystique,
As graceful curving columns stately march
Across the current meant to overarch.
Where do these geniuses obtain such skills?
They seem to have the wisdom Titans parch,
To keep mankind apart between two hills.

It likely was a fallen tree we owe
That bridged the gap above first water flow.

Author Notes It is impossible to pinpoint the moment that bridges were invented. No individual is given credit for the discovery of a means to safely cross chasms. Since the time man first discovered a fallen tree over a river, the art and technology of building bridges has developed, expanded, and thrived. Notable landmarks in the evolution of the bridge include the Romans use of stone to build aqueducts. Around 1777, the first iron bridges made their appearances.

In Mythology, bridges were a creation of the gods, as a bridge symbolizes the pathway to paradise. The Islamic religion believes in the Sirat or "the path of God". In the Inca tradition, Hanan Pacha, their version of heaven, was accessible only over a bridge woven from hair. Japanese Shinto religion gives the floating bridge of heaven, which connects to the home of the sky gods. The Bridge of Judgment in the Zoroastrian belief has the soul met either by a beautiful maiden, or ugly hag. Norse tradition has Heimdall, who guards the bridge Bifrost. It is covered with flame to keep those unworthy from entering, unless he blows his horn to let them pass. Native American plains tribes have Owl Woman guard the bridge to the afterlife. On the Malay Peninsula, the Meni Kaien have the tradition of Balan Bacham or the bridge of the dead, guarded by Mampes. The Persians have Rashnu who, along with Mithra, and Sraosa, guards the bridge to heaven, Chinvat. These are the Titans that I refer to in my poem. Of course, the hills are heaven and earth.

This poem is a Spenserian Sonnet.
A variant on the English Sonnet form is the Spenserian Sonnet, named after Edmund Spenser (1552 -1599), in which he uses an interlocking rhyme scheme of:
abab, bcbc, cdcd, ee.
A Spenserian Sonnet does not appear to require that the initial octave set up a problem that the closing sestet answers, as with a Petrarchan sonnet. Instead, the form is treated as three quatrains connected by the interlocking rhyme scheme and closed by a couplet. The linked rhymes of his quatrains suggest the linked rhymes of such Italian forms as the Terza Rima that uses interlocking Tercets. It creates a lovely pattern that stretches out the b and c rhymes quite nicely.

This photograph was taken by the author himself in May, 2011 along the Mississippi River. The Bridge is the Robert Street Bridge, connecting downtown St. Paul to West St. Paul.


Chapter 272
Butterflies Alight

By Treischel


Alight,
sweet butterflies.
Put tiny feet on me.
To be so closely met is my
delight.

Delight
me with your wings,
such lovely little things,
that flap and flutter so gently
in flight.

In flight,
open up your wings
to show your colors bright.
Such extraordinary things
to sight.

To sight
the color features
of these lovely creatures --
the outer browns, the inner blues,
excite.

Excite
with your presence.
It would be so pleasant.
As I so dearly hope you might
alight.



Author Notes If you have never been in a Butterfly Room, this is what it is like. They actually come and land on you. Kids love it. This room was at the Minnesota State Fair. What was unique about these butterflies is that the outside wings are a lovely brown patern with pearly eyes, while the inner wings are a lovely blue. In the photo, there is one with open wings. They are called the Blue Morpho and are native to Costa Rica. There was a Monarch.

This poem is a Crown Cinquain. Unlike other crown poems with 7 poems combined, this one has only five interlinked Cinquain poems. That's because this one is meant literally to become a crown. You see, when left justified, the Cinquain's 2,4,6,8,2 structure forms a nice point. A Crown Cinquain interelinks each seperate poem by having the last two syllables of each poem become the first two of of the next. The first two syllables of the first poem also become the last two syllables of the last poem. Thereby, making a circular link. When you put them together, they make several points. If you cut them out of a sheet of paper and linked first and last with tape, it would literally make a crown.

This poem is the last in my series of Cinquains in which I have written a Cinquain, Reverse Cinquain, Mirror Cinquain, Didactic Cinquain, Butterfly Cinquain, Garland Cinquain, Lantern, and now the Crown Cinquain. There are 5 other types of poems that are 5 line poems, but do not follow the Cinquain structure. They are: Quintains, Tankas, 5-7-5-7-7 Poems, Tetractys, and Teapot Dictionary (when the word has 5 syllables).

This photograph was taken by the author himself in August, 2014.


Chapter 273
Sunrise

By Treischel



Sunrise,
Tendrils of light
Across the horizon,
Spreading glow that glitters golden
In skies.

My eyes,
Drinking in the morning glimmer
As the waters shimmer,
Behold the bright
Sunrise


Author Notes On Father's Day, I got up early to go fishing with my son-in-law and grandson. I captured the sunrise from the shore.

This poem is a Mirror Cinquain
A Cinquain is a five line poem. The format, inspired by Adelaide Crapsey in 1915, has a fixed syllable count of: 2,4,6,8,2. Rhyming is optional.
A Reverse Cinquain has the opposite syllable count of: 2,8,6,4,2.
A Mirror Cinquain is a combination of both the Cinquain and the Reverse Cinquain. So there are two stanzas with the following syllable count: 2,4,6,8,2 2,8,6,4,2. This gives a balanced pattern that is pleasing.

For this poem, I chose to use rhyme. The rhyme scheme is:
Abcca addbA, where the capital letters indicated a repeated line.

This picture was taken by the author himself at Grey Cloud Island on the Mississippi River near St. Paul Park, Minnesota, on June 21, 2015.


Chapter 274
Kensington Runestone

By Treischel


The year Thirteen Fifty Four.
The rumors from our colony were dark
For Vinland was so far away
And it was said
Many had lost their faith
And left
To travel into other lands
Not authorized by King Eriksson
The ruler Magnus of all
Viking Clans

So I am Paul Knutson
And I am Law officer
By decree
And I shall gather forty men
To sail our longboat
To see
And right any wrongs
In colony lands

Follow my notes
For I have left
A permanent trail

Ave Maria

It took a year to find those forty men
The right kind
Willing to leave home
To travel long and far
And do whatever it takes
In unknown lands
Where danger lurks

I gathered them from the kingdom
Half were Geats from greater Sweden
Half were Norsk from Norway.
All stout Vikings
Wherever from

Ave Maria

It took another year
To build
And outfit
The boat.

Thirteen Fifty Six it was
When we set sail
West
Over the angry Atlantic sea
Following the stars by night
Following the water compass by day
To Vinland

The sea was harsh
The journey long
Through storms and fright
We did our best

Ave Maria

The colony was in bad shape
From
Crop failure
Disease
Dissention

They were glad for our arrival
And supplies
It was a pleasant surprise

I chiseled a rune
In commemoration
It was
Thirteen Fifty Seven
They treated us like heroes
A gift from heaven

We learned of a splinter group
Who lost their faith
Took up with foreign travelers
Strangers
Strange red men
Who came in small bark boats
With stories of a lusher land
And some were beguiled
Dismissed our leaders out of hand
And sailed west with them
Reconciled

We stayed with our colony
For nearly two years.
Helping them
To regain their strength again
Restoring their health
Building better structures
Planting stronger crops

We left in tears
The year
Thirteen Fifty Nine

For then
We headed west
Seeking
Those who disobeyed the law
Forsaking their birth
Faith
And
Friends

We swore that we would
Follow them
To the ends
Of the earth

We followed their trail

By and by
We came upon a large bay
Later known as Hudson Bay
Following South
along the shoreline
For months
Exploring
Until we reached a river mouth
Where we found signs
Some say made by Leif Ericson
Of our party
At a confluence later named for Nelson

By then it was Thirteen Sixty

We made camp to gather supplies
And communicate with the local tribes
Using hand signs, words, and grunts
But time slipped by
By months
As some got sick
But finally all recovered
Though time had gone by quick
It was late summer of Sixty one
I chiseled a rune for the record
A history for future scribes
Then said our goodbyes

Ave Maria

Then I left ten men at the longboat
Taking off in canoes
With native guides
Following the river South
Across vast lands
And forest stands
To a lake the Indians called
Winnepeg
And the people there
Recalled an earlier group
Along a similar leg
Of the journey
Who looked just like us
Besides

They pointed out a river
Called the Red
That flows North
So we set forth
Paddling upstream
To a place
With a gap
It would seem
That goes to a river
Heading South

It was evident
That's where our colonists went

It was there
On that river
Where we found them
It seems like
It took
forever

Of note
We were fourteen days
Journey
From our longboat.

Ave Maria

About thirty had settled
Mingled
Among the Mandans

Converted
To their ways and customs
Everyone

They greeted us with friendship
In this place
Later named Kensington.

I tried
I tried to convince them
The errors of their ways
To bring them back to Vinland
As the King required

But nobody obeys

Instead
They convinced me

It was better here

The land was better here
There were friendly people here
The weather was better here.
It was plain to see.

Some had taken tribal wives
They enjoyed their lives
And the opportunity

I was swayed
And I stayed
In a separate Viking camp
Too long

It was Thirteen Sixty Two
What was I to do?
I was likely long forgotten

Gone too long
Too long

I sent word back for the others to wait

Suddenly
Things changed
Another tribe came in
Who hadn't been there before

There was war

One day
I had taken half my group away
A days journey
Fishing

Evil actions were at play

When we returned
We found
Bloody death
The camp was burned
10 bodies
Killed and mutilated

And what was harder to believe
The Mandan village
Gone

Time to leave

Ave Maria

I found a stone
Chiseled a message
For others to find
Dated Thirteen Sixty Two
And left it behind

We made it back
After losses and hardships
Never to see that land again

Returned to Sweden
With only
Eight men

But that Runestone in Kensington
Became famous
A record of Viking presence
A record for everyone

Ave Maria



Author Notes This is a fictional characterization of what might have happened. Nobody knows for sure, and there is controversy over the authenticity of the Kensington Rune Stone that was found buried under the roots of a birch tree on the farm of a Swedish farmer in Northern Minnesota in 1898. Many believe that it is proof that the Vikings were in Minnesota from a Greenland (Vinland) colony prior to Columbus' discovery of America.

The Runestone is on display in a Museun in Alexandria, Minnesota. It has carvings on it known as ancient runes, in Old Norse script. The text translated reads:
"Eight Geats (Swedes) and twenty-two Norwegians on an exploration journey from Vinland to the west. We had camp by two skerries one day's journey north from this stone. We were [out] to fish one day. After we came home [we] found ten men red of blood and dead. AVM (Ave Virgen Maria) save [us] from evil."
"[We] have ten men by the sea to look after our ships, fourteen days' travel from this island. [In the] year 1362."

In 1354, King Magnus Eriksson of Sweden and Norway had issued a letter appointing a law officer named Paul Knutsson as leader of an expedition to the colony of Greenland, to investigate reports that the population was turning away from Christian culture. There is no firm evidence that the expedition ever took place. In a letter by Gerardus Mercator to John Dee, dated 1577, Mercator refers to one Jacob Cnoyen, who had learned that eight men returned to Norway from an expedition to the Arctic islands in 1364. One of the men, a priest, provided the King of Norway with a great deal of geographical information.
A possible route of such an expedition connecting Hudson Bay with Kensington would lead up either Nelson River or Hayes River, through Lake Winnipeg, then up the Red River of the North. The northern waterway begins at Traverse Gap, on the other side of which is the source of the Minnesota River, flowing to join the great Mississippi River at Saint Paul/Minneapolis. This route was examined by Flom (1910), who found that explorers and traders had come from Hudson Bay to Minnesota by this route decades before the area was officially settled.
I included a reference to the Mandans in the poem. The Mandans were a curious tribe that live in Upper Michigan. They were unusual for having blond hair and blue eyes. In the poem I have them intermarried, then suddenly disappear, due to other tribal incursions. Hjalmar Holand adduced the "blond" Indians among the Mandan on the Upper Missouri River as possible descendants of the Swedish explorers.
Source: Wikipedia

The Picture is from Yahoo images.


Chapter 275
Pink Ladies

By Treischel




These lilies grace the hedge in luscious pink.
Their petals open like a mother's arms.
Inviting butterflies to take a drink
Of nectar, adding to their floral charms.

Their petals open like a mother's arms.
Pink ladies fill the air with lovely scent
Of nectar, adding to their floral charms.
We savor them to maximum extent.

Pink ladies fill the air with lovely scent,
And lend their vibrant color to the scene.
We savor them to maximum extent.
They look so beautiful against the green.

Inviting butterflies to take a drink,
These lilies grace the hedge in luscious pink.


Author Notes Aren't these lovely. They are some more Lilies I found in my brother's back yard. Such a vivid pink just begged to be photographed, much less imortalized.

This poem is a Pantoum Sonnet.
A Pantoum Sonnet combines the characteristics of the two formats. A Pantoum is a repeating poem whose second and fourth lines become the first and third lines of the next stanza, and so on. The Sonnet is a 14 line poem with 12 lines of abab rhyming and two closing rhymed lines, or couplet. This type of Sonnet can be formed in the contemporary manner of three Quatrains with closing couplet, or the traditional way of 14 lines together. So, the Sonnet contains a rippling set of repeated lines. It also closes with the first and third lines of the first stanza as the rhyming couplet. Only it is done in reverse order, so that the first line of the poem becomes the last. In either case, the rhyme scheme for this Pantoum Sonnet is:

A1/B1/A2/B2/-- B1/C1/B2/C2/ -- C1/D1/C2/D2/ -- A2/A1

This photograph was taken by the author himself on July 11, 2015.


Chapter 276
The Verdent Pond

By Treischel


A pond amidst the verdant moss,
Where ripples ring the mirrored gloss,
Attracts the most aesthetic eye.
A pleasant scene to look across.

A gentle trickle falls nearby
To bring the pool its cool supply,
Of most refreshing water fill,
In lovely liquid lullaby.

The flowage dribbles down a hill,
Between the mossy foliage spill,
To sunshine dappled lily pond,
Where two bright aspen leaves lie still.

But when such visions lie beyond,
Could any person not respond?


Author Notes I wrote this poem specifically to describe this picture. This garden is in my brother Richard's back yard. It is only a small corner of it.

This poem is a Rubiyat Sonnet.
A Rubiyat Sonnet combines the attributes of a traditional Sonnet, having 3 Quatrains and closing couplet, with a Rubiyat, having quatrains that interlink rhymes. The Rubiyat mono-rhymes line 1,2,and 4 of each stanza, while line 3 creates the rhyme for the following stanza, thus interlinking them, to ripple down like a waterfall. So the rhyme scheme is:
aaba bbcb ccdc dd.

This photograph was taken by the author himself on July 12, 2015


Chapter 277
Tree Top Thoughts

By Treischel




When e'er thou buildest nest, best not to build with twigs,
Unless an eagle be, who decorates with sprigs.
For comfort be thy goal,
when e'er thou buildest nest,
Unless thee thrive in trees, a softer nest is best.

A home is meant to be a place where most relax.
Not likely, when thy rump is sitting on sharp tacks.
That's not the common way
a home is meant to be.
But then again, most are not living in a tree.

Did nature compensate for giving birds their wings?
To gain command of air, did give up other things?
I oft' have wondered thus.
Did nature compensate?
When given gift of flight, is treetop home thy fate?

'Tis just this observation, subtly profound,
When God was making plans, we humans lived on ground.


 

Author Notes I just think that an Eagle's nest looks very uncomfortable and very exposed to the weather. So, even though I have often thought that I'd like to be an eagle, and to soar to the heights, when I think about living in or on one of their nests, I change my mnd. I'll keep my soft bed and pillow in a nice warm house, thank you. Besides, we learned to make airplanes now.

I thought a touch of Olde English would add to the feel of the poem.

This poem is a Slide Sonnet.
The Slide Sonnet was created by Victoria Sutton, aka "PassionsPromise."
Like most Sonnets, it has 14 lines. It is composed with eight, ten, or twelve syllables to each line. The unique feature of this format is, that the first half of the first line of each stanza, "slides" to the last half of the third line, creating a unique poetic repetition. The rhyme scheme may be in any of the standard Sonnet rhyme schemes, either: aabb ccdd eeff gg (coupled), or abab cdcd efef gg (alternating), or abba cddc effe gg (enveloped). It is typically done in iambic. The volta, or turn, occurs at line 9.

This photograph was taken by the author himself with a high power lens from 200 yards away, across a river, on March 12, 2015.


Chapter 278
Minnesota Capitol Building

By Treischel

The seat of government is physical.
When comes the time to build a capitol
Designs all tend to turn to classical.

With domes and arches meant for regal show
Of Greek and Roman architecture frills,
Where stone and marble decorations go
Upon the walls, the floor, and window sills.

Where all the shapes and forms are geometrical,
Aesthetic possibilities are practical,
Resulting in a building that is magical.

Then gild the topmost cupola in gold,
And any other spots where it's allowed,
Providing classic statement that is bold
To make the residents of this state proud.


Author Notes This picture is of the Minnesota State Capitol Building, located in downtown St. Paul, Minnesota. It houses the Minnesota Senate, Minnesota House of Representatives, the office of the Attorney General and the office of the Governor. The building also includes a chamber for the Minnesota Supreme Court. The building was built by Butler-Ryan Construction and designed by Cass Gilbert and modeled after Saint Peter's Basilica in Rome - the unsupported marble dome is the second largest in the world, after Saint Peter's. However, like all capitols with domes in the US, it is also inspired by the idea of domed capitols originating with the United States Capitol dome. Work began on the capitol in 1896, and construction was completed in 1905.

This poem is a Saraband Sonnet.
A Saraband Sonnet is a form that consists of a Tercet + Quatrain + Tercet + closing Quatrain. It can be configured in various styles: English, Italian, Spanish or French, making it extremely flexible. Each stanza can be unique, but here are the basic rules.

Stanza 1: a Tercet, rhyme aba or aaa.

Stanza 2: a Quatrain, any quatrain form or rhyme.
The stanza forms may be mixed, taking on any of the classic forms as shown below.
English: abab or abcb.
Italian: baab.
Spanish: bcbc.
French: bbcc.

Stanza 3: a Tercet, but must be same Tercet form as Stanza 1, and requires at least line 2 of both Tercets to rhyme.

Stanza 4: a Quatrain, any Quatrain form and rhyme.

Any metrical foot.
Any metrical line.
Some authorities insist on eight syllables but this is not cut and dried.
Rhyme scheme: depends on the form chosen.
The Volta the first line of the second Tercet.

This photograph was taken by the author himself on October 18, 2012.


Chapter 279
Time To Play

By Treischel

 
 
 
 
Today, we found sufficient time to play,
To take the time to share the fun kid’s make,
As they so innocently can portray
A break from things we grownups may foresake,
To smile and just be silly for a while,
To hug and just cavort upon a rug,
To pile upon each other with some style,
And mug some funny faces, looking smug.
 
Oh how delightful, living in the now!
It’s real, how children’s joy can make you feel,
Allowing peals of laughter to endow
A healing tonic touch  of such appeal.
 
So go enjoy them, they so quickly grow,
And show them love. They’re gone before you know.
 
 

Author Notes This is my son-in law Jeremy, with two of my grandkids, Isaac and Skylah. It is always delightful to watch a parent at play with their children. How infectous the laughs are.

This poem is a Beymorlin Sonnet.
The Beymorlin Sonnet is unique in it's mirrored rhyming. It is structured within the conventional 14 line format of a Sonnet, but it requires the second syllable of each line to rhyme with the end-rhyme of each line, in addition to carrying an overall rhyme scheme of the author's choosing. For this one, I chose:
ababcdcd efef gg.

I bolded the rhymes to make it easier for you to see.

This photograph was taken by my daughter on her cell phone and posted to me in Facebook.


Chapter 280
Little People

By Treischel


These little people live here in the wood,
So simple and sincere among the trees,
In setting natural for such as these.
They live there where they know that life is good.
Some think that they are magic'ly possessed,
Because that's what the legends have foretold.
Along with a huge hidden pot of gold,
They'll disappear whenever they're distressed.

But if you win their trust with winsome ways,
They'll bless you with whatever you may wish,
And then you know you're in for better days.
They'll lift their hands and wave a magic swish,
Then "poof", it will delight you and amaze.
You'll never be again impoverished.



Author Notes These little sculptures that could be elfs, leprechauns, or gnomes, were found in my brother Richard's garden. I loved his setting. It inspired me to write this.

This Poem is a Byron's Sonnet.
Lord Bryon wrote several Sonnets. Byron's Sonnets are obviously influenced by the Italian form rather than the English and possess an Octave with a Sestet. The eight lines of the Octave comprises of a progression of three rhymes a. b. b. a... a. c. c. a., but it's the six lines of the Sestet that makes it unique, with its pattern of d. e. d...e. d. e. This was his favorite and signature rhyme scheme. The total interweaving rhyme scheme is:
abba acca ded ede.
It is written in iambic pentameter. Volta at line 9.

This picture was taken by the author himself on July 11, 2015.


Chapter 281
When Your Love Is

By Treischel

 
 
 
 
When your love is really true
Happiness comes passing through
Everything that you may do,
No matter what troubles brew.
 
Young people don’t understand
Other gifts at their command
Until they’ve had to withstand
Ravages that lay at hand.
 
Loving couples have a bond
Only death can go beyond.
Very often they respond.
Enduring they grow fond.
 
It’s a lasting testament
Such a strong development.
 
 

Author Notes A young and older couple for contrast.

An Acrostic Sonnet. A 7 syllable meter. Mono-rhymed stanzas.

The photograph is one of the author's own.


Chapter 282
Scurrying Squirrels

By Treischel



It's up and down, all day long, grey squirrels scurry,
To find their food around the autumn trees.
Just watching them, seems they're in a hurry
To store up food before the winter freeze.
Such active guys, their moves are acrobatic
When scampering with motions so dramatic.
They'll run straight up the trunks, then down with ease.
Then jump from limb to limb like a trapeze.
Then suddenly, they'll stop, as if they're frozen,
And blend into the bark's dark camouflage.
To predators a silhouette mirage
That disappears when hindrance has been chosen.
They hurry, scurry up and down a tree.
Their playfulness is wonderful to see.




Author Notes I walked through a park last fall that was full of squirrels scurrying about. I must have seen 50 of them that day. It was on a boulevard full of mature oak trees. I captured a couple of them here. They inspired this poem.

This poem is a Pushkin Sonnet written in the english version.
The Pushkin Sonnet (aka: Onegin Sonnet), contains a couple of unique features, The first is in its meter, and the second is in its layout. It was popularized (or invented) by the Russian poet Alexander Pushkin through his novel in verse, Eugene Onegin. The work was mostly written in verses of iambic tetrameter with the rhyme scheme:
aBaBccDDeFFeGG,
where the lowercase letters represent feminine endings (i.e., with an additional unstressed 9th syllable) and the uppercase representing the typical masculine ending (i.e. stressed on the final 8th syllable). So that is the first feature mentioned.
However, the English version is written in Iambic pentameter, with the feminine 11th syllable occuring in the same sequence as the Italian.
The second unique feature involves the lack of stanzas. Unlike other traditional forms, such as the Petrarchan Sonnet or Shakespearean Sonnet, the Pushkin stanza does not divide into smaller stanzas of four lines or two in an obvious way.

This picture was taken by the author himself on October 17, 2014 along the East Mississippi Boulevard.


Chapter 283
The Spot

By Treischel

Just
take me to
that hidden glade

with a carpet
of
leaves and shade,

where
thoughts
flow free
and dreams are made.

Released
right here
beside this brook

with Autumn
everywhere
you look.

A cloak
along the path you took,

and
hanging clusters
in the trees

that r u s t l e
in the gentle
b-r-e-e-z-e

are
things
that set
the mind
at
e-a-s-e

and
make a most
ROMANTIC MOOD

where interuptions
won't
intrude.


It's there
I wish
to promise you

My heart
remains forever
TRUE.

Author Notes This is a lovely brook that is located out at the Minnesota Arboretum. It looks like an excellent spot to make a proposal. Maybe on that bridge.

This poem is a Free Style Sonnet.
In a Free Style Sonnet, the text is laid out just like a Free Verse, except it has a rhyme scheme. Each stanza is like a line in the Sonnet, so there are 14 stanzas. They actually read as iambic tetrameter. The rhyme scheme is:
aaa bbb ccc ddd ee.

This picture was taken by the author himself on October 16, 2014.


Chapter 284
Golf Course Sign

By Treischel



Directions on this chiseled stone
Create a setting very strange
Where groups of purple leaves have grown
Nearby the golf course driving range.

Where benches placed upon the range
Are visible above what's grown
Around the words upon the stone
That steel spikes are considered strange.

But then again, it's not so strange,
For greens are never made of stone
And solid cleats may ruin the range
Of cultured grasses that were grown.

Is it so strange highlights are grown
'Round driving range's message stone?


Author Notes Shown here is a pretty well maincured and decorated stone sign at the River Oaks Golf Course in Cottage Grove, Minnesota, where I recently played in a tournament. It stands right in front of the practise driving range. On it is a reminder that steel spikes, or cleats , are no longer welcome on the course. Here I'm just speculating on how pretty that stone sign is.

This poem is a Sestina Sonnet.
A Sestina is unusual in that it doesn't use rhyme, but instead uses the same words repeated in differnet sequences for each stanza. Normally, the Sestina has 6 repeated words sequences over six verses and a closing Tercet that uses all six words. In order to accomodate a Sonnet, it has been modified to have 4 words ending each line of a Quatrain repeated over three verses, with a closing cuplet that incorporates the four key words. So, if you identify the four words with the letters A,B,C, and D, the word sequence for the Sonnet is:

ABCD DCAB BADC (BC)(DA)

For this poem, I chose the 4 Words as:
A - stone
B - strange
C - grown
D -range

This photograoh was taken by the author himself on July 11, 2015.


Chapter 285
The Debate

By Treischel



I watched the political debates,
With all Republican candidates
Neatly aligned in rows,
So their true color shows,
When grilled by Media heavyweights.

A boost to the TV rating slump,
As viewers tuned in for Donald Trump.
He didn't disappoint,
As he lit up the joint.
His language dominated the stump.

Should the women and immigration
Dominate the poll's conversation?

Worldly prospects of war
Could lead to so much more.


Author Notes I intentionally tried to steer away from specifics here, to only speculate on Trump stealing most of the spotlight, and how the Media focused more on that, than any other issues.

This Poem is a Limerick Sonnet.
Since I found none, I created this format myself.
The format uses the signature Limerick syllable count and rhyme scheme. A limerick is a form of poetry which is sometimes obscene with humorous intent. The oldest attested text in this form is a Latin prayer by Thomas Aquinas of the 13th century. The form appeared in England in the early years of the 18th century. It was popularized by Edward Lear in the 19th century, although he did not use the term. Gershon Legman, who compiled the largest and most scholarly anthology, held that the true limerick, as a folk form, is always obscene, and cites similar opinions by Arnold Bennett and George Bernard Shaw, describing the clean limerick as a "periodic fad and object of magazine contests, rarely rising above mediocrity". From a folkloric point of view, the form is essentially transgressive. Violation of taboo is part of its function. Of course that's all debatable.
So, that is the form I modified to create this Sonnet. Since the Limerick uses a Quintet (5 line) structure, I elected to give it two closing couplets rather than one, in order to achieve the classic 14 lines. The frist couplet has 9 syllables. The second has 6 syllables. The Volta comes at the first couplet (lines 11 and 12).
The rhyme scheme is: aabba ccddc ee ff.
The syllable count is: 9,9,6,6,9 - 9,9,6,6,9 - 9,9 - 6,6

Being about politics, I thought the limerick a good choice of format.

This photograph is from Yahoo Images.


Chapter 286
Water Garden

By Treischel


Water falling is the most perfect setting
Anyone could ever appreciate, when
Walking through the forest without forgetting
Pathways where you've been.

Terraced gardens gently surround cascading
Rivulets, that fill the ravine with music,
Symphonies with rocks that are serenading,
Gently acoustic.

Such sights, such sounds, racing around the bubbling
Brook, where every nook has a look that's pleasing
Here in quiet park, it's a never troubling
Place for easing.

Go there when you need to resuscitate your
Energy within your poor Soul's unseen core.


Author Notes This lovely spot is part of the Japanese Gardens located at Como Park in St. Paul, Minnesota. The terraced trees, the pond, the rocks and waterfall, all combine to provide a tranquil setting. I tried to capture that here in this poem.

This Poem is a Sapphic Sonnet.
I came across a Sapphic Ode Sonnet in my Sonnet research, but I found that one to not truly follow the Sapphic format, since it really was following an iambic model with a short 4th line. So, I wrote this one myself following the real quidelines of a Sapphic verse. So this Sonnet has the classic 14 line format of 3 Quatrains and a rhyming Couplet, but the meter follows the Sapphic structure as outlined below for a Sapphic verse.
The Sapphic Verse dates back to ancient Greece and is named for the poet Sappho. Sapphics are made up of four-line stanzas with three long lines, frequently of 11 syllables, followed by a short line of typically 5 syllables. The main building blocks of the Sapphic are Trochees and Dactyls. The Trochee is a metrical foot with one stressed syllable followed by an unstressed one, while the Dactyl contains a stressed syllable followed by two unstressed ones. The first three lines of the Sapphic contain two Trochees, a Dactyl, and then two more Trochees (making 11 syllables). The shorter fourth, and final, line of the stanza is called an "Adonic" and is composed of one Dactyl followed by a Trochee (making 5 syllables). Hence the syllable count is:
11/11/11/5 -11/11/11/5 -11/11/11/5-11/11
So, if you characterize a stressed syllable as "-", and unstressed as ".", the metric Sapphic line would be:
-.-.-..-.-.
and the Adonic would be:
-..-.

However, there is some flexibility with the form as when two stressed syllables replace both the second and last foot of each line.
While most Sapphic lines are unrhymed, because this is a Sonnet, I rhymed this poem in a classic scheme of:
abab cdcd efef gg.

This photograph was taken by the author himself on September 10, 2013.


Chapter 287
Enjoy a Fire

By Treischel


I love to sit about, enjoy a fire,
To watch those dancing flames is my desire,

To be entranced by open flick'ring flame
That draws my gaze into its very heart,
Where hidden mysteries remain unclaimed.

Aromas of that burning wood impart
A feeling that the fragrances proclaim,
Of camping reveries that often came
With woodland explorations from the start,

In places much too numerous to name
That left impressions as the fondest part,
As each new pyre reminds me why I came.

To watch those dancing flames is my desire,
I love to sit about, enjoy a fire.


Author Notes I love a good campfire. Whether burning birch, oak, pine, or cedar, the aromas are wonderful. I can stare into the flames for hours. Any time I smell a fire, it takes me back.

This poem is a Tirrell Sonnet.
A Tirrell Sonnet was created by Robert Tirrell Leonard, a poet from Woburn, MA. who is also a politician and author of several poetry collections.
The Tirrell Sonnet (an American model), is quite different and has a unique feel to it. It starts with a couplet followed by a tercet, followed by a quatrain, adding the turn with a following tercet and then reversing the order of the repeated couplet as a sort of refrain.
So it is: Couplet + Tercet + Quatrain + Tercet + reversed Couplet.
It features only 3 rhymes (a,b,and c). It is written in iambic pentameter.
This can create an introspective feel to the whole poem.
The rhyme scheme is:
A1, A2 - b,c,b - c,b,b,c - b,c,b - A2, A1,
where the capital letters indicate the repeated verses and the numbers provide identification.

In this one, the volta is a bit subtle, but it moves away from a description of the fire itself, to the connection with location.

This picture was taken by the author himself in September, 2011.



Chapter 288
Exploring Cliff Cave

By Treischel


Exploring sandstone cave is dangerous, but seems
Beguiling and enthralls adventure smitten souls.
Watch out for ceiling falls, as frequently it does.
You need to be quite brave, but also very smart.
Initials you engrave, to prove that you've been there,
In those soft sandstone walls, remain a long long time.
As history recalls your presence, it may stay,
Or end up on your grave, if you're not careful then.

So when you climb so high, to see the hidden sights,
It's fine to peer inside, exploring what you've found,
But stop to catch the view that you've been climbing for,
And watch the clouds go by from awesome eagle's heights.
With common sense abide, when you're searching the cave.
All will go well with you, if you remain alert.




(Now here it is repeated with the rhyme revealed in bold)


Exploring sandstone cave is dangerous, but seems
Beguiling and enthralls adventure smitten souls.
Watch out for ceiling falls, as frequently it does.
You need to be quite brave, but also very smart.
Initials you engrave, to prove that you've been there,
In those soft sandstone walls, remain a long long time.
As history recalls your presence, it may stay,
Or end up on your grave, if you're not careful then.

So when you climb so high, to see the hidden sights,
It's fine to peer inside, exploring what you've found,
But stop to catch the view that you've been climbing for,
And watch the clouds go by from awesome eagle's heights.
With common sense abide, when you're searching the cave.
All will go well with you, if you remain alert.

Author Notes It is exciting to explore caves, but also very dangerous. There are several in our area. Some deaths have occured from cave-ins, falling, lack of oxygen, and carbon monoxide. This one is located along the Mississippi River bluffs near downtown St. Paul, Minnesota. It is somewhat hidden and requires a bit of climbing. A good inspiration, I think.

This poem is a Visser Sonnet. It was created by Audrae Visser,
Poet laureate of S. Dakota, (1974-2001). It reads much like a Blank Verse poem, in that it is done in iambic meter (12 syllables, or Hexameter, in this case), and has no end rhymes. However, it does indeed have rhyme, but it is hidden in the middle of each line, rather than at the end. So it becomes extremely subtle. In fact, it takes the scheme of a Petrarchan Sonnet, with its rhyme scheme of:
abbaabba cdecde.
The volta also remains at line 9.

It is so subtle that it can be easily missed. So I repeated the poem here, revealing the rhyme. I must say, that after having written one and reading several others, my reaction is "Why?" I see no real value in hiding the rhyme, other than the pure challenge of writing one. Maybe each one should start with an introduction and challange to the reader to find and define the rhyme scheme. Otherwise, I'm not very enamored.

I thought having hidden rhymes very appropriate for caves that have hidden dangers.

This photograph was taken by the author himself on March 28, 2015.


Chapter 289
haiku sonnet (bright decoration)

By Treischel



bright decorations
multi-colored lilies grow
wondrous creations

stunning floral show
in homes or apartment flats
makes the garden glow
in colors that catch the eye
while observers tend to sigh

blossom's bloom
colors any room
poisons cats

try
to grow a few nearby
Hai


Author Notes These are some more of the lovely lilies that my brother, Richard, has all over his backyard. I love the colors in this hedge by one of his pools. His wife, Corrine is a marvelous gardener.

Lilies are notoriously poisonous to cats.

One thing that I have discovered in my research of the Sonnet genre of poetry, is that the form seems adaptable to almost limitless poetic formats. However, in my search, I never found one that adapted the Japanese characteristics of their poetry. So, I created this form myself. May Sonnet purists forgive my Bohemian spirit.

This poem is a Haiku Sonnet.
The Haiku Sonnet actually blends several Japanese formats into a 14 line structure that also containes other Sonnet features, such as a rhyme scheme. The format begins with a 5-7-5 Haiku followed by a 5-7-5-7-7 Tanka. It then executes a 3-5-3 Haiku and closes with a rhymed 1-6-1. Because I want to emphasize the Japanese correlation, this format must end with the word "Hai", which is Japanese for "Yes".
A Sonnet usually carries a "Volta", so mine is in the 3-5-3 (lines 9 - 11). Still the Haiku and Tanka require a similar turning point, called a "Kiru", in each of its formats, so I tried to achieve that too. I think I got it in each Haiku. Not so well in the Tanka. The rhyme scheme Is:
aba bcbdd eec ddd.

I hope you like this attempt.

This photograph was taken by the author himself on July 11, 2015.


Chapter 290
Geese at Peace

By Treischel



A lazy summer day on lush pastoral hill,
Provides a pleasant backdrop artists contemplate,
That gives a feathered family of geese their fill
Of seeds, in fresh-cut grass upon a large estate.
The parents both provide examples, what to choose.
Their youngsters follow, looking like some yellow puffs.
It's such a treat to watch these gratifying views,
To see all these small geese in fuzzy downy fluff.

We love babies of any kind.
They help to set a tranquil mind.

For when we see these youngsters with their mom and dad
They represent simplicity we wish we had.
It's plain to see these birds all seem to have such peace.
I wish we all could be as happy as these geese.


Author Notes A family of geese on a fresh cut hillside, The little ones look like fuzzy balls of fur. Such a peaceful setting got me wishing and musing. I captured it in a photograph, then wrote this piece specifically for it.

This poem is a Tory Hexatet Sonnet.
This is a sonnet form created by Victoria Sutton aka PassionsPromise and name by Larry Eberhart, aka Lawrencealot.

It consists of an Octet + couplet + quatrain, with a rhyme scheme of:
ababcdcd ee ffgg.

The format features the first eight lines (the Octet) in 12 syllable iambic hexameter, but the rhyming couplet holds to eight syllables (iambic tetrameter), located at line 9, rather than at the end. The last last four lines of the closing quatrain revert back to 12 syllables. So the poem retains the signature total 14 lines of a Sonnet.
The couplet in the center provides the "changing point", or volta. The shorter meter provides a visual, as well as oral impact. Thus, It makes a direct statement and could be read by itself.

This photograph was taken by the author himself of these Canadian Geese in Woodbury, Minnesota on May 22, 2015.


Chapter 291
Humanity

By Treischel


Humanity is all about.
The numbers cannot be denied.
The trend is on an upward glide,
Where our resources soon collide,
And there are some things we can't do without.
Like any fresh water supply.
Our reservoirs are going dry.
We soon may just be getting by.
How long will it take for food to run out?
Is our survival in some long-term doubt?

We seem a very resilient lot,
And some resources are renewable.
We can learn conservation and practice
All the ways to consume within reason.

Humanity is all about.
Our intelligence has no real limit
When inspiration resides within it.
Add in our science and necessity,
We'll find ways to save our society.
For the need is great to forge the right route,
And there are some things we can't do without.

Author Notes At least one can hope.

This is a Fusion Sonnet.
It was invented by the Greek poet, Yannis Livadas (born in 1969), and popularized by Sonnet Modal. I was drawn to this one by the tripple rhymes imbedded in it.

This falls under the auspicies of the Modern Sonnet genre. As such, it breaks several Sonnet rules. Most notibly, it has 21 lines rather than the the typical 14. The fusion comes from blending in 4 lines of free verse at lines 11 through 14. It has a strict structure and rhyme scheme, but is more flexible in the area of meter. Here are the complex rules:

14 line Poem followed by a half sonnet of 7 lines acting as a coda or tail to add additional stability to the poem. No particular meter is followed fusing it with the modern free verse style.

First Fourteen Lines:
Same Rhyme in 1st,5th,9th & 10th Lines.
Same Rhyme in 2nd,3rd & 4th Lines.
Same Rhyme in 6th,7th & 8th lines.
Rhetorical questions in 9th & 10th lines.
Negative and pessimistic note in the first 10 lines.
Free verse carrying Optimistic Tone in 11th, 12th,13 & 14th Lines.
Volta gradually through 9th, 10th and 11th lines.

Next Seven Lines:-The Half Sonnet acting as a coda.
Same Rhyme in 16th and 17th lines.
Same Rhyme in 18th and 19th lines.
Volta in the 20th line.

For this poem the rhymes scheme, as laid out above is:
A1, b,b,b, A2, c,c,c, (4 lines free verse)----A1, d,d,e,e,A2, where the capital letters indicate repeated lines.

The picture was taken by the author himself at the Minnesota State Fair in August, 2014.


Chapter 292
Storm Shot

By Treischel


I captured this dim soggy sight
One rainy night,
Of lighted street
That raindrops beat.

The streetlamp left an eerie glow
I thought I'd show
In photograph,
On storm's behalf.

The raindrops here cannot be seen,
Just surface sheen.
They seem to hide.
At least I tried.


Author Notes One night, a large storm was predicted, with high winds, lots of lightning, and heavy rain. So I set up my camera in my garage to catch it. The lightning was all cloud to cloud, so it only provided flashes of general light, but nothing spectacular. The rain was pouring down heavily, so I tried to capture the raindrops through the street lights. The rain didn't show up either. Overall a disapointing night. However, I did get this shot, so I wrote this poem. Hope you agree that I at least salvaged something.

This poem is a Minute Poem
The Minute Poem is a poem that follows the "8,4,4,4" syllable count structure. It usually has 3 stanzas that are exactly the same.

So: 8,4,4,4; 8,4,4,4; 8,4,4,4 syllables.

A traditional Minute Poem has 12 lines total. It has 60 syllables (thus the Minute). It is written in a strict iambic meter. The rhyme scheme is as follows:

aabb, ccdd, eeff.

This photograph was taken by the author himself on July 12, 2015.


Chapter 293
Golden Eye in Sky

By Treischel



Once glimpsed a marvelous sunset.
A golden eye
Had glow to seem at first beget
A candy sky,
With caramel-like colored clouds
That drifted by to please the crowds.
How lucky they all were to spy
A golden eye.

For such a sight, let's not forget,
That words apply
To such a colorful vignette
That floats on by
To peak the curiosity
And render thoughts of poetry
When troubadours identify
A golden eye.


Author Notes This is a sunset I captured one evening. I thought that the sun looked like an eye. It got me waxing poetically.

This poem is an Octogram.
The Octogram is a style of poetry invented by Fanstorian Sally Yocom (S.Yocom). It consists of two stanzas of eight lines each, with a very specific syllable count and rhyme scheme.

Syllable count is: 84848884, repeat on second stanza.

Rhyme scheme: aBabccbB ababddbB, where B repeats same text. No more than 16 lines. Strict iambic meter on all lines.

This photograph was taken by the author himself on April 22, 2015.


Chapter 294
Elk

By Treischel



Elk,
Large deer
With huge horns
Whose antlers shed
Then regrow each year.
Big body in the North Woods
Males bugle, then chase the rut,
Fight massive jousts for dominance.
Distinguishable by deer's "white rump",
American people's grant name --"Wapiti".

Northern hemisphere's fraternal order,
Formed to avoid bar closing rules.
They support local charities.
Benevolent protective,
The order of the Elk.
Bury at Elk's Rest
Loyal to Flag
Patriotic
Humble
Elk

Author Notes When I was in a Cemetery recently, I came across this strange monument of a large Elk. The plaque read "Elk's Rest". I took a photo and then moved on, wondering what that was all about. So, I later Googled the words and found out that that section of the cemetery is reserved for members of the Elk's Lodge. The full name of the organization is - The Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, or BPOE. It is a fraternal organization first founded in New York by former theatrical workers who needed a drinking spot to stay legally open past bar closing laws. It's Grand Lodge now is headquartered in Chicago, and has evolved over time to provide assistence to its members and charity to other local organizations. One of its benefits was to provide local cemetery plots to its members when they die. These plots are known as Elk's Rest. That explains the statue.

The true Elk is one of the largest mammals on the North American continent and is a member of the deer family. Native Americans, the Cree and the Shawnee, named it "Wapiti" because of its "white rump".

This poem is a a set of two Etheree.
This first about the mammal, and the second about the Order.
The poetry form, Etheree, consists of 10 lines of 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10 syllables. Etheree can also be reversed and written 10, 9, 8, 7, 6, 5, 4, 3, 2, 1. No rhyme scheme required.

This photograph was taken by the author himself at Lakewood Cemetery of Minneapolis, Minnesota, on May 25, 2015.


Chapter 295
Cash

By Treischel


When there's a mighty mastiff on the scene,
A guard who is as stoic as the Sphinx,
It limits any possible hijinks
(Regardless of his catching twenty winks),
Even though this dog looks so serene.
His radar still remains on high alert.
For if you cause his owners any hurt,
You'll find that bulldog's speed can really spurt.
Did you think that he was just a figurine?
Don't looks convey the image that he's mean?

This dog can be as friendly as a pup.
He'll wag his tail and lick your hand.
Scratch his ears, he'll be your friend.
He's all muscle and a gentle heart.

When there's a mighty mastiff on the scene,
Intruders must beware.
There's power sitting there,
Content to be sitting on the grass.
He'll stay there as the hours pass.
Defensive actions quickly might convene,
Even though this dog looks so serene.



Author Notes Meet CASH. He's my brother Richard's Bulldog. He's a member of the family who is quite a character. Cash is gentle and playful, unless you threaten the family, or are another dog. Then he can explode in a fury of amazing speed. He has a big bark. I wouldn't challenge his bite.

This poem is a Fusion Sonnet.
Ok, I found another intriguing format.
It was invented by the Greek poet, Yannis Livadas (born in 1969), and popularized by Sonnet Modal. I was drawn to this one by the tripple rhymes imbedded in it.

This falls under the auspicies of the Modern Sonnet genre. As such, it breaks several Sonnet rules. Most notibly, it has 21 lines rather than the the typical 14. The fusion comes from blending in 4 lines of free verse at lines 11 through 14. It has a strict structure and rhyme scheme, but is more flexible in the area of meter. Here are the complex rules:

14 line Poem followed by a half sonnet of 7 lines acting as a coda or tail to add additional stability to the poem. No particular meter is followed fusing it with the modern free verse style.

First Fourteen Lines:
Same Rhyme in 1st,5th,9th & 10th Lines.
Same Rhyme in 2nd,3rd & 4th Lines.
Same Rhyme in 6th,7th & 8th lines.
Rhetorical questions in 9th & 10th lines.
Negative and pessimistic note in the first 10 lines.
Free verse carrying Optimistic Tone in 11th, 12th,13 & 14th Lines.
Volta gradually through 9th, 10th and 11th lines.

Next Seven Lines:-The Half Sonnet acting as a coda.
Same Rhyme in 16th and 17th lines.
Same Rhyme in 18th and 19th lines.
Volta in the 20th line.

For this poem the rhymes scheme, as laid out above is:
A1, b,b,b, A2, c,c,c, (4 lines free verse)----A1, d,d,e,e,A2, where the capital letters indicate repeated lines.

This picture was taken by the author himself om July 11, 2015.


Chapter 296
Uncle Billy

By Treischel



Uncle Billy, World War Vet'ran,
Paratrooped Normandy,
Had joined the D-Day Invasion
In Airborn Infantry.
He jumped to glory over France
When Allied gen'rals took a chance.
He jumped to glory.
He jumped to glory,
To end Herr Hitler's arrogance.

Uncle Billy, World War Vet'ran,
Landed in farmer's field
On France's coast, with his weapon,
A rifle did he wield.
He gave his all to win freedom.
Went where we so badly need em.
He gave his all.
He gave his all,
Freeing France from Nazi fiefdom.

Uncle Billy, World War Vet'ran,
Great generation's survivor,
Ending what the Germans began,
Was D-Day skydiver.
Rest in peace, you humble warrior.
The German lines, no barrier.
Rest in peace you.
Rest in peace you.
Job well done, Hitler's harrier.



Author Notes This is my Uncle Billy's gravestone at Fort Snelling National Cemetery. He did paratroop into France on D-day and fought his was to Berlin with the US Third Infantry. He was never wounded. When he came home, he became a fireman in the Richfield, Minnesota, Fire Department. I can tell many stories about Uncle Billy, but maybe some other time. He died in 2006 at the age of 85.

This poem is a Trijan Refrain.
The Trijan Refrain, created by Jan Turner, consists of three 9-line stanzas, for a total of 27 lines. Line 1 (A1) is the same in all three stanzas. The first four syllables of line 5 in each stanza are repeated as the double-refrain for lines 7 and 8. The Trijan Refrain is a rhyming poem with a set meter and rhyme scheme as follows:

Rhyme scheme: A1/b/a/b/c/c/R/R/c ,
where A1 is the repeated line, and R is the first 4 word from line 5,

Meter: 8/6/8/6/8/8/4/4/8

This picture was taken by the author himself on May 25, 2015.


Chapter 297
The Back Door

By Treischel



The back door of a home
has personality.
It lets you out to play
with just your family,
where pets have room to roam

~ that opens up the way ~

to garden of delight,
a private place of pride,
where many days you may
go barbeque outside
with those you might invite.


Author Notes The backdoor is a portal to the back yard, which can either be a private area for the family, or a place to share with neighbors and/or friends. This particular back door is my brother Richard's.

This poem is a Puenta.
The Puente is a poem created by James Rasmusson. It consists of two larger stanzas seperated by a single line stanza. The name means "bridge", the Spanish word for bridge is "Puente". The puente in this format is the single line between the two stanzas. You start with one aspect of a topic or issue and then, line by line, work toward another aspect. In the center is a line that bridges the two aspects together. The first and third stanzas have an equal number of lines. The first and third stanzas convey a related but different element or feeling. The number of lines in the first and third stanza is the writer's choice, as is the choice of whether to write it in free verse or rhyme.
The center line is delineated by a tilde (~) and has "double duty". It functions as the ending for the last line of the first stanza AND as the beginning for the first line of the third stanza. It shares ownership with these two lines and consequently bridges the first and third stanzas.

This picture was taken by the author himself on July 10, 2015.


Chapter 298
Lovely Loons

By Treischel



Listen to the Loon
Sing north woodland's tune.
It may linger, echoing,
Far across the lake.
Lonely sounds they make.
A distinctive song they sing.


In the North they thrive,
Where they swim and dive,
Then appear another place,
Lost along the shore.
Spotting them once more,
You may marvel at their grace.



Author Notes I love to hear and watch the Loons on the northern lakes. Their long eerie calls are iconic sounds of the northwoods. They are incredible swimmers. One minute you'll be watching them glide along the surface. Then suddenly, they disappear in a dive. Eventually they pop up somewhere else on the lake. You have to search to find them again. You may not find them, until they call again.

This poem is an Alouette Poem.
The Alouette, created by Jan Turner, consists of two or more stanzas of 6 lines each, with the following set rules:

Meter: 5, 5, 7, 5, 5, 7
Rhyme Scheme: a, a, b, c, c, b

The form name is a French word meaning 'skylark' or larks that fly high, the association to the lark's song being appropriate for the musical quality of this form. The word 'alouette' can also mean a children's song (usually sung in a group), and although this poetry form is not necessarily for children's poetry (but can be applied that way), it is reminiscent of that style of short lines. Preference for the meter accent is on the third syllable of each line.

This picture is one of the author's. It is actually a stuffed Loon that was on display at the Science Museum. The photograph was taken April 22, 2012.


Chapter 299
Spellbound

By Treischel



Bright flowers placed with pride,
all set in patterned rows.
or drifting water flows,
where oft' I go inside,
as senses may collide
between my eyes and nose.

This lovely plant tableau
of colors most profuse,
is perfect poet's muse.
For there the mind lets go,
to wander to and fro,
while passions are let loose.

To sense the sights, the smells,
Is felt like magic spells.


Author Notes A spot where I find lots of inspiration. This is the Marguary McNeeley Conservatory at Como Park in St. Paul, Minnesota. Admission is free. It is just one of several indoor garden rooms, know as the Sunken Garden.

This poem is a Hex Sonnetta.
The Hex Sonnetta, created by Andrea Dietrich, consists of two six-line stanzas and a finishing rhyming couplet with the following set of rules:

Meter: Iambic Trimeter (6 Syllables)
Rhyme Scheme: abbaab cddccd ee

This particular form uses six syllables of iambic trimeter per line. Thus, the name Hex Sonnetta, as it keys off the number 6. The first part of the form's name refers to the syllable count per line, as well as six lines per Stanza. The second part of the name, Sonnetta, is to show this to be a form similar to the Sonnet, yet with its shorter lines and different rhyme scheme, it is not the typical Sonnet. Not only does this poem have six syllables per line, it also has a set of two six-line stanzas, giving an extra "hex" to the meaning of Hex Sonnetta. The rhyme scheme, with the two 6-line stanzas has more of an Italian feel. The rhyming couplet completes the classic 14 line format of the Sonnet.

This photograph was taken by the author himself on March 1, 2012.


Chapter 300
Cling

By Treischel



The dragonfly that hangs upon the edge
And clings tenaciously to slender leaf,
Reminds me of the fears we all allege
To conquer, as life's journey is so brief,
And time will steal our moments like a thief.
But soon the dragonfly lets go and flies,
As we must let go any false belief.
There are no more eternal alibi's,
And fate will never listen to our cries,
If all the good within us ever dies.



Author Notes A dragonfly tightly clinging to the edge of a Water Lily leaf gave me the inspiration for this poem. I spotted him at the Nature Preserve in Maplewood, Minnesota. This dragonfly is a Blue Darner (Aeshna Canadensis). Their common name is a direct reference to their eyes, which often are an intense blue. They are plentiful within their geographic range, which includes the central and western United States, southern Canada, Mexico and Central America. These independent dragonflies are generally drawn to swamps, ponds and lakes, particularly those at lower altitudes. Blue darners also like sluggish creeks that have plants on the sides. They usually manage fine in alkaline water. They cope with high daytime temperatures by staying in trees or tucked away between plants. The preferences of mature blue darners range from stoneflies to moths to mosquitoes. They feed in the beginning of the day and at night. Blue-eyed darners are adept at flying, sometimes whizzing at several mph while searching for sustenance.

This poem is a Decuain Poem.
The Decuain (pronounced deck-won), created by Shelley A. Cephas, is a short poem made up of 10 lines, which can be written on any subject. There are 10 syllables per line and the poem is written in iambic pentameter.

There are 3 set choices of rhyme scheme:

ababbcbcaa, ababbcbcbb, or ababbcbccc

For a longer Decuain poem, add more stanzas.
For this poem, I chose the ababbcbccc rhyme scheme.

This photograph was thaen by the author himself on June 21, 2012.


Chapter 301
Butter for Soldiers

By Treischel



Pass the salt
Pass the butter
Butter the bread
Butter me up
Up side the head
Up the old river
River flowing wild
River in a rage
Rage of a child
Rage against the light
Light my fire
Light the night
Night of adventure
Night of delight
Delight in nature
Delight in desire
Desire and shiver
Desire it all
All to the giver
All, all for one
One for the Gipper
One off the wall
Wall of the sun
Wall in the mall
Mall selling liquor
Mall is now closed
Closed to excitement
Closed now forever
Forever exposed
Forever with you
You are my sunshine
You have been true
True to our memory
True through and through
Through to the end
Through thick and thin
Thin as the ice
Thin as the dew
Dew on the window
Dew on the grass
Grass under trees
Grass in the fields
Fields full of cow herds
Fields full of flowers
Flowers for the bees
Flowers for the soldiers
Soldiers buried in rows
Soldiers guard the pass
Pass on the news
News 'round the table
Pass the salt

Author Notes The Nez Pierce War of 1877 fought several battles in the Yellowstone area of Montana. The Native Americans fought their way from centeral Idaho trying to reach Sitting Bull in Canada. Many on both sides died, which I reflected in the love and death segments. The table represents how the news was mostly rumors for most people. Most of the Ameican public was unaware of these battles in the Mountains. I used butter as a symbol for the Yellowstone.

This poem is a Blitz Poem.
The Blitz Poem, a poetry form created by Robert Keim. This form of poetry is a stream of short phrases and images with repetition and rapid flow, a stream of consciousness, if you will.

Begin with one short phrase, it can be a cliche. Begin the next line with another phrase that begins with the same first word as line 1. The first 48 lines should be short, but at least two words.

The third and fourth lines are phrases that begin with the last word of the 2nd phrase, the 5th and 6th lines begin with the last word of the 4th line, and so on, continuing, with each subsequent pair beginning with the last word of the line above them, which establishes a pattern of repetition. Continue for 48 total lines with this pattern, And then the last two lines repeat the last word of line 48, then the last word of line 47.

The title must be only three words, with some sort of preposition or conjunction joining the first word from the third line to the first word from the 47th line, in that order.

There should be no punctuation. When reading a BLITZ, it is read very quickly, pausing only to breathe. The word Blitz is derived from German, meaning "fast". There is no rhyme or meter requirement.

For this poem I did include some rhyme, and brought the poem full circle, having the last line echo the first. But, that is not a requirement.

This picture is from Yaho Images.


Chapter 302
Computer Industry Genesis

By Treischel



A spark, a thought, a draft design,
Desire to meet a certain need,
A mind alert to help define -
All elements to plant the seed.

Then from a noble nebulous,
A dream that was ambiguous,
Took on its own reality,
Creating opportunity.

John Mauchly and John Eckert gave
A gift to the entire world.
Turned on the first Eniac 1,
As digital readouts unfurled.

For thus it was, they turned the page.
From 1's and 0's the men bestowed
The magical binary code,
And ushered the Computer Age.

They formed the firm of Univac.
Put first commercial use to it,
For government's need, keeping track,
And turned a profit - just a bit.

In Nineteen Fifty census counts,
The Univac machine worked out
To prove efficiency throughout,
Reducing time by large amounts.

From something that was so benign,
Some software tools became divine.
The world was soon completely changed,
Amazed, improved, and rearranged.

And from it sprang a whole new way
Of doing complicated tasks.
It should rank high celebrity
Whenever survey question asks.

This joins historic tapestry.
They founded whole new industry.


Author Notes John Mauchly and John Eckert created the first electronic U. S. built, programmable computer, Eniac 1, which is now in the Smithsonian Museum at Washington, D.C. The year was 1946. They had been working on it for several years as part of the war encryption effort, while they worked as graduates at the University of Pennsylvania. It used 20,000 vaccuum tubes. The inside of the computer took up a whole room at the time, as shown above. There were other similar mechanical devices at the time, but this one was fully electronic and programmable. Most notably, IBM had the market for mechanical business machines. The government needed a computer to automate the 1950 Census, so Mauchley and Eckert created the first commercial computer, formed a company named Engineering Research Associates (ERA), won the contract, and went public in 1951. They named the computer Univac, which later became the name of the company. Employees from that company spun off several other companies, such as: Data 100, Cray Research, and Control Data. I joined Univac in 1967.

This poem is a Super Sonnet
A Super Sonnet is composed of several Quatrains closed by a rhyming Couplet. It generally utilizes all four of the primary rhyme schemes:

Alternate Rhyming - abab
Coupled Rhyming - aabb
Enveloping Rhyme - abba
Skipping Rhyme - abcb

So, the poem writes a set of the four types, and then repeats them as many times as the author wishes. The four sets are neccessary in every four stanza series, but not neccessarily in the same sequence. One required feature though, relates to the very last stanza, which is always the abcb rhyme type. The unrhymed third line of that stanza sets the rhyme for the final rhyming Couplet, thereby linking the last Quatrain to the Couplet. The creator of this format in unknown, but there are many examples of this form around.

For this poem I used only two sets of the four types. In the first four, I used - alternating, coupled, skipping, then enveloping. For the second set, I went - alternating, enveloping, coupled, and then skipping.

I kept the meter as iambic tetrameter.

This picture is from Yahoo Images. It is the inside of the Eniac1 computer.


Chapter 303
Fall, The Best

By Treischel




Enjoy the leaves when Autumn comes for then the world becomes
A landscape-painter's dream, where all the colors are extreme.
Where a pretty pigment scheme provides such vivid outcomes.
The day at once succumbs unto the beauty of the scene.

When adding up the sums, another aspect to include,
Bright sunlight, it would seem, adds its own vibrancy to all,
And houses in between complete the urban attitude.
The pulse of Nature hums within the Season we call Fall.

The squirrels may soon intrude, as they scurry for their nuts.
A soul may hear the geese call, flying over, heading south.
All creatures, big and small, prepare their Winter huts.
You'll see some storing food -- a chipmunk, acorns in its mouth.

So, if you're asking, "What's the finest Season to attest?"
There are no IFs, or ANDs, or BUTs, it's Fall that seems the best.




(Poem repeated with rhymes bolded)



Enjoy the leaves when Autumn comes for then the world becomes
A landscape-painter's dream, where all the colors are extreme.
Where a pretty pigment scheme provides such vivid outcomes.
The day at once succumbs unto the beauty of the scene.

When adding up the sums, another aspect to include,
Bright sunlight, it would seem, adds its own vibrancy to all,
And houses in between complete the urban attitude.
The pulse of Nature hums within the Season we call Fall.

The squirrels may soon intrude, as they scurry for their nuts.
A soul may hear the geese call, flying over, heading south.
All creatures, big and small, prepare their Winter huts.
You'll see some storing food -- a chipmunk, acorns in its mouth.

So, if you're asking, "What's the finest Season to attest?"
There are no IFs, or ANDs, or BUTs, it's Fall that seems the best.

 

Author Notes It's a bit early here for the leaves to change, but it won't be much longer. Last year's colors where spectacular. I took this picture along Summit Avenue in St. Paul, Minnesota, last fall. I wanted to capture both the essence of this picture in it's city setting, as well as the nature of the season.

The capitalization in this poem is intentional by the author.

This poem is a Dual Sonnet
A Dual Sonnet is very similar to the Bey Morlin Sonnet that I published earlier, in that both contain in-line rhyming, The Bey Morlin requires the second syllable to match the end-line rhyme. The Dual Sonnet requires a rhyme scheme in the center of the Hexametered lines of the stanza, but not neccessarily matching the end-line rhyme scheme. Infact, there are two intertwining but seperate rhyme schemes within the poem. The two schemes are as follows:

Stanza 1
a - a
b - b
b - a
a - b

Stanza 2
a - c
b - d
b - c
a -d

Stanza 3
c - e
d -f
c -e
d - f

Couplet
e - g
e - g

Since this may be hard to detect in the poem, I repeated it with the rhymes bolded so that you can see the rhyme scheme in detail better.

This picture was taken by the author himself on October 16, 2014


Chapter 304
His Word Quickly Spread

By Treischel




"Go forth and teach ye all nations", he said.
"Go forth, go preach them the Gospel's good news".
Apostles went, and His words quickly spread.

For sins of this world, He suffered and bled,
Atonement for Adam's apple taboos.
"Go forth and teach ye all nations", he said.

For Satan's works have been put in their stead.
Christ's message of Love shows the path to choose.
Apostles went, and His words quickly spread.

That Jesus redeemed the living and dead,
While His actions upset all worldly views.
"Go forth and teach ye all nations", he said.

A church was newborn, where believers lead,
Evangelists let the Bible infuse
Apostles went, and His words quickly spread.

"I AM the way, the truth, the light", we read,
And for our sakes was He beaten and bruised.
"Go forth and teach ye all nations", he said.
Apostles went, and His words quickly spread.


Author Notes I wrote this for the contest, but it seems to have disappeared. so I'm posting it anyway. This picture is if Jesus commisioning his Apostles to go spread the word, and it was by word of mouth, and through the written word. Here was the origin of the newborn christianity.

This poem is a Villanelle.
A Villanelle is a nineteen-line poetic form consisting of five tercets followed by a quatrain. There are two refrains (A1 and A2) and two repeating rhymes (a and b), with the first and third line of the first tercet repeated alternately until the last stanza, which includes both repeated lines. The Villanelle is an example of a fixed verse form. It is structured by two repeating rhymes and two refrains: the first line of the first stanza serves as the last line of the second and fourth stanzas, and the third line of the first stanza serves as the last line of the third and fifth stanzas.
The rhyme-and-refrain pattern of the villanelle can be schematized as:

(A1)b(A2) ab(A1) ab(A2) ab(A1) ab(A2) ab(A1)(A2)
where letters ("a" and "b") indicate the two rhyme sounds, upper case indicates a refrain ("A"), and superscript numerals (1 and 2) indicate Refrain A1 and Refrain A2.

There is no specific meter required for a Villanelle.

This picture is from Yahoo images.


Chapter 305
Turning Two

By Treischel



When little angels turn to two,
They often change their halo rings
To Devil's horns and other things.
They make us wonder what to do.

We pray it's just a passing phase,
As mischief is their major joy.
Will time improve that naughty boy,
And bring about much better days?

When spanking, parents must avoid,
Our skills are pushed beyond all hope.
We dangle at the end of rope,
When antics make us most annoyed.

When little angels turn to two,
They make us wonder what to do.


Author Notes This is a picture of my grandson, Isaac, when he was two. He's 3 now, and still a handful.

This Poem is a Swannet Sonnet (or just Swannet)
The Swannet Sonnet whilst not the creation of the Canadian poet, Gloria Carpenter, it has become her trademark being used in conjunction with her elemental and avian photo studies in British Columbia.
It is a straight forward form comprised of 14 lines with 3 Quatrain stanzas of enveloping rhyme (abba) and a rhyming couplet. The key feature is the repeat of line 1 and 4 to also become the closing Couplet.
The rhyme scheme is:
(A1)bb(A2) cddc effe (A1)(A2),
where A1 is the first line of the first stanza, as well as the couplet, and A2 is the last line of the first stanza, and the last line of the poem.
The meter is not specified but is usualy tetrameter or pentameter.

This photograph was taken by my daughter, Aisha, on her cell phone.


Chapter 306
Sidewalk Adorned

By Treischel


This sidewalk's splayed with flowers in a pot.
Their elegance provides a touch of charm,
With floral sights that make the setting warm
To those who travel by this lovely plot.

For usually, more often than it's not,
An unembellished concrete is the norm.
This sidewalk's splayed with flowers in a pot.
Their elegance provides a touch of charm.

But I believe I like it quite a lot!
It sets a sense of peace without alarm,
Where lovers walk together arm-in-arm.
In fact, it may become their favorite spot.

This sidewalk's splayed with flowers in a pot.
Their elegance provides a touch of charm.



Author Notes A concrete sidewalk can be pretty plain, but a pot of flowers can really dress it up. This sidewalk had several of them with different plants and flowers. I tried to find out what these are. To the best that I could determine, they are geraniums.

This poem is a Rondel Prime Sonnet
A Rondel is a poem with two Quatrains followed by a Sestet where the first two lines of the poem become repeated as the last two lines of the next two stanzas (the second Quatrain and the Sestet). Sometimes the second line is dropped in the last stanza. It is usually in tetrameter, but is always iambic.
So, the rhyme scheme would be:
ABba abAB abbaAB (Prime),
or
ABba abAB abbaA (Classic).

The conversion to a Sonnet is quite simple. Change the meter to pentameter and separate the last two lines of the Sestet to make it a Couplet. In actuality the Rondel Prime, as introduced in France about 1544 by Clermont Marot, was a Sonnet. But the classic form became more popular. The rhyme scheme then for the Sonnet becomes:
ABba abAB abba AB.

This photograph was taken by the author himself on July 11, 2015.


Chapter 307
Dahlia Bloom

By Treischel

The delicate Dahlia bloom
With circles of lovely florets
Will brighten most any a room.
There's beauty wherever it sets.

It's certain one never forgets
The delicate Dahlia bloom
With petals that turn pirouettes
Creating a colorful plume.

They give off a lovely perfume,
Aroma that often begets
That delicate Dahlia bloom
The love of enthused Baronets.

It moves many florists to groom
The delicate Dalia bloom.


Author Notes The Dahlia is a gift from Mexico. Spaniards reported finding the plants growing in Mexico in 1525. The earliest known description is by Francisco Hernandez, physician to Philip II, who was ordered to visit Mexico in 1570 to study the "natural products of that country". They were used as a source of food by the indigenous peoples, and were both gathered in the wild and cultivated. The Aztecs used them to treat epilepsy, and employed the long hollow stem of the (Dahlia imperalis) for water pipes. In 1789, "plant parts" were sent from Mexico to Abbe Antonio Jose Cavanilles, Director of the Royal Gardens of Madrid, where he cultivated them. In 1791 he called the new growths "Dahlia" after Anders Dahl a famous botonist. In 1798, Cavanilles sent seeds to the Marchioness of Bute, wife of The Earl of Bute, the English Ambassador to Spain, who sent them to England. There they were cultivated and hybridized by the British elite. Thus, my reference to Baronets.

This poem is a Qautern Sonnet
A Quatern is a poem consisting of four Quatrains, where the first line of the poem ripples through each stanza. It becomes the second line of the second stanza, the third line of the third stanza, and the last of the fourth. It makes for a lovely waterfall effect as the line ripples from beginning to end of the poem. This creates a rhyme scheme of:

Abab bAba abAb babA
where the capital letter signifies the repeated line.
Written in tetrameter.

Therefore, to make a Quatern Sonnet, you merely turn the last quartain into a rhymed couplet, using the repeated line as the last line of the poem, but retaining the waterfall effect. The rhyme scheme becomes:
Abab bAba abAb aA.
For this poem I used an anapestic tetrameter (da Dum da da Dum da da Dum).

This picture was taken by the author himself at the Minnesota Arboretum on October 16, 2014.


Chapter 308
Washburn Watertower

By Treischel



The shoreline with this forest scene
Is blanketed in verdant green.
A water tower peeking through
Is in the Washburn neighborhood
Near where the fam'ly homestead stood.

It's plainly seen across the lake,
Where strolling walkers oft' partake
To glimpse this portion of the view,
When near the place her ashes rest,
As truly fits a last behest.

Her brood all grew near tower's site.
This lake, her favorite place to be.
She's near where she raised family
At rest in waters day and night.



Author Notes This is a picture of the Washburn Watertower standing above the shoreline of Lake Harriet in Minneapolis, Minnesota. It is near Washburn High School, where my wife, Karen, graduated. Her childhood home is practically kitty-corner from the tower. Washburn is an early Minnesota industrialist who helped build the lock and dam at St. Anthony Falls which helped power the grain milling industry. He founded the company that later became General Mills. More pageant to the poem, we recently have strewn some of her mother's ashes in the Lake.

This poem is a Roserian Sonnet
The Roserian Sonnet was created by Jose Rizal M. Reyes of the Philippines. It consists of two Quintets or Quintrains (5 line stanza) plus a closing Quatrain. The two Quintrains are interlinked with a shared rhytme in the third line (middle) of each. So there are two rhyming couplets in the first stanza with another rhyme sandwiched between them that matches the one in the center of the second stanza. It's almost like a peek-a-boo rhyme. The closing Quatrain uses an enveloping rhyme. It's usually written in iambic. Volta somewhere after line 8.
So it's a Quintet + Quintet + Quatrain, using a rhyme scheme of:

aabcc ddbee fggf

This picture was taken by the Author himself on August 21,2015.


Chapter 309
Fountain with Fatsia

By Treischel


The fountain in the garden flows
Surrounded by green Fatsia,
An oriental plant that grows
In such abundance in Japan,
Provides as pretty panacea
As any water fountain can.

Its overflow delights the eye,
Where spillings dribble from the top.
They sally forth to trickle by,
And cool the nearly naked nymph,
Who watches each and every drop.
He catches some in his triumph.

The fountain in the garden flows.
Its overflow delights the eye.

Author Notes I found this fountain along a path at the Minnesota Arboretrum. The playful nymph seems to be trying to catch some of the droplets in his mouth, that dribble over the edge of the plate he is holding up. I thought that was delightful! I was wondering what those huge leaves were that surround the fountain. I looked them up and couldn't decide if they are Polydendrons or Jananese Fatsia. I decided that they are Fatsia.
Fatsia Japonica is an evergreen shrub growing to 9.8 to 9.7 ft tall, with leaves that are spirally-arranged, with 7 - 9 broad lobes. The name "fatsia" is an approximation of the old Japanese word for "eight", referring to the eight lobes. In Japan it is known as yatsude, meaning "eight fingers". It looks wonderfully exotic and, as a native of Japan and South Korea, you would imagine that it would be a touch on the tender side. Well, in severe winters it may well be killed back a little - especially if heavy snowfall weighs down its branches - but it always seems to bounce back, and not just in milder counties. So it is no surprise to find it thriving here in Minnesota.

This poem is a Cornish Sonnet.
The Cornish Sonnet is said to be influenced by Arab traders to the Cornish coast. This verse form is a merging of Arabic meter and the Sonnet. Exactly when and how this came about is unknown. Early Cornish verse is fragmented and stringy at best. The earliest literature in the Cornish language were fragments of religious plays. The language became all but extinct by the 18th century but what was preserved in some verse in octaves using 7 syllable loose trochaic lines and alternating rhyme. Unlike verse from other Celtic origins, deliberate use of alliteration or other devices of "harmony of sound" are not present. This sonnet form doesn't fit with these early findings, so it can only be assumed that it arrived on the scene much later than originally presumed.

The defining features of the Cornish Sonnet are:
2 sestets made up of linked enclosed tercets, followed by
a refrain which is the repeat of the first line of each sestet,
metered at the discretion of the poet, lines should be similar length.
The rhyme scheme is:
Abacbc Dedfef AD
The capital letters show that the first line of each sestet are repeated in
refrain of the closing couplet.

This picture was taken by the author himself on October 16, 2014.


Chapter 310
Best Buddy

By Treischel



What better buddy than a doggy
To get you out to exercise,
And set the pace for when you're jogging.
As healthcare pundits emphasize.
A great companion everywhere, when
He enjoys any time you share, then
A dog can raise your spirits high
To be your body's best ally.
Not everything is loads of fun, no.
There's several things that owners do,
Like picking up the doggy poo.
When everything is said and done, so
Unlimited the love you get,
Along with nose both cold and wet.


 

Author Notes I snagged this random photo of a jogger and his dog one morning while I was out with a bird watching group at the Nature Center. Dogs are certainly great for getting you outside to walk or run them. I sure miss my dog, Tiva, who was 17 years old, but we had to put to her to sleep about 5 years ago. She was a Shepard/Husky mix that we got from the Humane Society when she was a puppy.

This Poem is a Pushkin Sonnet done in the Italian format.
I was introduced to this format by our fellow FanStorian poet, Pantygynt.

The Pushkin Sonnet (aka: Onegin Sonnet), contains a couple of unique features, The first is in its meter, and the second is in its layout. It was popularized (or invented) by the Russian poet Alexander Pushkin through his novel in verse, Eugene Onegin. The work was mostly written in verses of iambic tetrameter with the rhyme scheme:
aBaBccDDeFFeGG,
where the lowercase letters represent feminine endings (i.e., with an additional unstressed 9th syllable) and the uppercase representing the typical masculine ending (i.e. stressed on the final 8th syllable). So that is the first feature mentioned.
The second unique feature involves the lack of stanzas. Unlike other traditional forms, such as the Petrarchan Sonnet or Shakespearean Sonnet, the Pushkin stanza does not divide into smaller stanzas of four lines or two in an obvious way.

I did you i touch of slant rhyme in this poem (doggy, jogging).

This photograph was taken by the author himself on April 12, 2012.


Chapter 311
Time

By Treischel


Hark unto me, listeners hark!
Time waits for none, fast fleeting time,
Dark in the night, it drags in dark.
Sublime then, when rest is sublime.

Fast, as the years blur by, so fast.
Slow, when you're waiting, it goes slow.
Last to mind, when coming home last.
Know it, when there's a need to know.

So keep clocks handy, keep them so.
Our lives are organized as our
Flow of day's rhythm sets the flow.
Hour can be numbered by the hour.

Time waits for none, fast fleeting time.
Chime every hour, sweet sounding chime!

Author Notes We have created time, and harnessed ourselves to it since the first sundials. For better or worse, it helps organize our lives. Sometimes it goes fast. Sometimes it goes slow.

I must recognize tfawcus, because Tony lead me to find and research this format.

This poem is a Shadow Sonnet.
The Shadow Sonnet was created by Amera M. Andersen. It may be written in any sonnet style. The Shadow takes place at the beginning and ending of each line as the words are identical or homophonic. Since all poetry was originally meant to be sung or recited out loud, homophonic words are acceptable, these are words that sound alike such as "see and sea".
Rules: 14 lines, 8, 9 or 10 syllables per line. The poem should have a volta or pivot; iambic pentameter is not necessary.

This photograph was taken by the author himself on March 13, 2012.


Chapter 312
This Moon, This Bridge

By Treischel


The moon shines bright in the indigo sky,
Intense the glow upon its pearly face,
Reminding me of love that drifted by,
When it is framed in stone of time and space,
As by this bridge's arch, that lends such grace.
For once we stood here watching such a moon,
And time's cruel ravages cannot replace
The memories of joys that left too soon.

So now I stand and sadly wonder why
Just how this circumstance could be the case --
Your lovely sight should only make me cry,
Reminding me of facts I can't erase
Of loving arms that held a warm embrace.
For now the love on that late afternoon,
From promises here, in this very place,
Are memories of joys that left too soon.

The sickness came along to set awry
Our plans to prosper in this chosen place.
As death's cruel touch decided to deny
The wedded happiness that couples chase,
And only such tragedy could displace.
Oh moon, you sing to me a sadder tune,
Because your sight sends signs I can't retrace,
The memories of joys that left too soon.

I never dreamt your light would now efface
This bridge's past delights. Oh no! Oh moon!
But now you cause my heart to madly race,
With memories of joys that left too soon.

Author Notes This is the Robert Street Bridge in Downtown St. Paul, Minnesota. I happened to capture this rising moon one evening while I was out on a walk. The story is pure fiction, just driven by a strange muse. It doesn't relate to anyone in particular.

This poem is a Ballade. I was reminded of this lovely format when I reviewed one recently by tfawcus, a fellow FanStorian, called Attention Span.
A Ballade is an Old French verse form that consists of three eight-line stanzas (Octaves) and a four-line envoy. The rhyme scheme is:
ababbcbC ababbcbC ababbcbC bcbC, where the capital letters are the repeated lines.
The last line of the first stanza is repeated at the end of each of the subsequent stanzas and the envoy, creating an echoed thought. The difficulty of this format is that it only allows 3 rhymes (a,b, and c) throughout the 28 lines of the poem, none to be repeated. So the rhyming becomes quite a challenge. It is written in Pentameter.

This photograph was taken by the author himself on January 8, 2012.


Chapter 313
Hawk Eyes

By Treischel



A Hawk can see for miles.
See it in his eyes.
They top his hunting wiles,
being sharp and wise.

See it in his eyes.
That stare fiercely beguiles,
as chances arise
to hunt prey in the isles.

That stare fiercely beguiles.
It hides a surprise
of life's testing trials,
where the loser dies.

It hides a surprise.
There are no denials.
Prey caution applies.
A Hawk can see for miles.


Author Notes I said it ALL. This is a Red-tailed Hawk.

This poem is a Quadrilew.
Created by C. G. V. Lewis, the Quadrilew is a form of quatrain poem of at least 4 stanzas, with an abab rhyming scheme, repeating lines, and containing an alternating syllable structure.

In the first verse, the poet may either start with a five or six syllable line. If the choice is five then the 'sounding' syllable count is (and opposite if the count is six):

VERSE ONE,
Line 1, 5 syllables.
Line 2, 6 syllables.
Line 3, 5 syllables.
Line 4, 6 syllables.

VERSE TWO,
Line 1, (which is a REPEAT of line 2 of the FIRST verse) has 6 syllables.
Line 2 new line of 5 syllables
Line 3 new line of 6 syllables
Line 4 new line of 5 syllables.

VERSE THREE,
Line 1, (which is a REPEAT of line 3 of the first verse) has 5 syllables.
Line 2 new line of 6 syllables.
Line 3 new line of 5 syllables.
Line 4 new line of 6 syllables.

VERSE FOUR,
Line 1, (which is a REPEAT of line 4 of the first verse) has 6 syllables.
Line 2 new line of 5 syllables.
Line 3 new line of 6 syllables.
Line 4 new line of 5 syllables.

If the first line of verse one has 6 syllables then the pattern is
Verse 1, 6565,
Verse 2, 5656,
Verse 3, 6565,
Verse 4 5656: (the rhyme pattern still being abab.)

This picture was taken by the author himself on August 28, 2015.


Chapter 314
Football Game

By Treischel


Helmets on.
Numbered jerseys upon
Excited kids, who dream of glory.

On fields of grass, marked by chalked-off territory,
They battle hard to tell the victory story;
Exerting effort, absorbing pain ~

An Autumn age domain ~
Football game.


Author Notes This is a Poem about American Football. The picture is from my grandson Jeremy's game. He is number 87 in the photograph and is playing defensive linebacker. They lost the game 18 - 12. His team is all 6th Graders (11 year olds). He has been playing since he was 9.

This poem is a Trois-par-Huit.
The Trois-par-Huit ( French forThree-by-Eight) was created by Lorraine M. Kanter. It is a poem containing three stanzas of eight lines, with a distribution of 3, 3 and 2 lines OR 3, 2 and 3 lines across the 8 lines total. One aspect of this format is that, the first 7 lines of the poem provide an image in words that the last line (the same as the title) names. The format is derived from a rich poetic pedigree of French poetry. A Huitain is a French verse-form coming from the 15th and early 16th Centuries, with an eight-line stanza with 8 or 10 syllables in each line, often iambic. It was written with three rhymes. The Un huitain enlace, or an enclosed huitain had a rhyme scheme of aabaabcc, which this non-iambic form borrows. Rather, this format carries a structured format in a pyramided syllable count.

It has a syllable count of: 3, 6, 9, 12, 12, 9, 6, 3.

The rhyming pattern is:
aab bbc cc,
where the last line is the title of the poem and summarizes the meaning of the poem.
*Note: These poems are to appear center aligned.

This photograph was taken by the author himself on Saturday, September 19, 2015.


Chapter 315
The Yellow Mountains of China

By Treischel


The Yellow mountain range of Chinese lore
can glow in sunset's shine like purest gold.
What beauty has brought culture to the fore?
Its very vistas, beautiful and bold.

Huang Di, China's leader who was known
as "Yellow Emperor" of ancient fame --
There's legends he ascended heaven's throne
from there, which gave that mountain site his name.

Huangshan, "Yellow Mountain" in Chinese,
gained fame -747 AD.
Li Bai described it in a poem treatise,
which brought attention as a sight to see.

The sixty thousand steps carved in its side,
were dug out fifteen hundred years ago.
Unesco's designation brings great pride,
And twenty thousand poems been penned, or so.

These mountains rise unto majestic heights
as one of China's most artistic sites.


Author Notes Huangshan (literally: "Yellow Mountains") is a mountain range in southern Anhui province in eastern China. So like the Appalachians in the USA, they are the east coast range, as opposed to the western Himalayas. The area is well known for its scenery, sunsets, granite peaks, Huangshan Pine trees, hot springs, winter snow, and views of the clouds from above. Huangshan is a frequent subject of traditional Chinese paintings, poetry, and literature, as well as modern photography. It is a UNESCO World Heritage Site, and one of China's major tourist destinations. The name is commonly thought to have been coined in honor of Huang Di (the Yellow Emperor), a legendary Chinese emperor, and the mythological ancestor of the Han Chinese. One legend states that Huangshan was the location from which the Yellow Emperor ascended to Heaven. Another legend states that the "Yellow Emperor " cultivated moral character and refined Pills of Immortality in the mountains, and in so doing gave the mountains his name. The first use of this name "Huangshan" often is attributed to Chinese poet Li Bai. His use of the name in 747 AD seems to have brought the area more attention. Huangshan is known for its stone steps, carved into the side of the mountain, of which there may be more than 60,000 throughout the area. They have been said to be more than 1,500 years old.

This poem is a Heroic Sonnet.
The Heroic Sonnet is the cornerstone format of the Crown of Heroic Sonnets, which links a string of seven of them together. Unlike other Sonnets this format does not require a volta (or turn), in that it is meant to convey large amounts of information, or a story. It consists of four Quatrains typically in iambic pentameter, using one of two classic ryhme schemes throughout, either aabb or abab. It is closed with the usual rhyming Couplet. So it contains 18 lines, rather than the usual 14 lines of a Sonnet, in order for it to tell a longer story. That's were the "heroic" designation comes from, that extra Quatrain.

This photograph is from Yahoo Images.


Chapter 316
Long Ago Creatures

By Treischel




So long ago these creatures did exist,
And finding them created quite a stir,
Though stories have been lost in History's mist.

But archeologists dig up old bones,
Enjoying the reveal of real unknowns.

As they give modern knowledge a huge twist,
Because things so far back are just a blur,
So long ago these creatures did exist.

Their bones were buried deep within the earth,
Before mankind was given modern birth.

The tales of ancient monsters do persist.
Could these be those the legends oft' refer,
Though stories have been lost in History's mist?

For yes, their very bones proclaim the truth.
Lived Dinosaurs in planet's early youth.

Their artifacts unearthed can't be dismissed.
Still some seem most unlikely to concur,
So long ago these creatures did exist.

For some, it is too much of a surprise.
Unless they see them live before their eyes.

For most that notion quickly is dismissed.
They see those lives did certainly occur,
Though stories have been lost in History's mist.

Displays of their remains, we can't resist
To see what strange and giant beasts they were.
So long ago these creatures did exist,
Though stories have been lost in History's mist.



Author Notes This scene is from the Science Museum's Dinosaur display in downtown St. Paul, Minnesota. Some people don't actually believe in dinosaurs. They either are skeptics, or religious fanatics. I heard one person tell me that they are a hoax, planted to disprove creationism of the bible. So those thoughts inspired this poem.

This poem is a Gra Reformata.
The Gra Reformata, created by Michael King, is based upon the Villanelle form.

Following the basic setting of the Villanelle, the a Gra Reformata has an extra couplet between each tercet. This couplet can be either rhymed within the structure of the rest of the poem, or in free verse, but always in iambic pentameter.
So there are the ususual five Tercets followed by the closing Quatrain of the Villianelle, with four Couplets interspersed between the Tercets.
This gives the following Format:

Stanza 1: A1-b-A2
Stanza 2: c - c
Stanza 3: a-b-A1
Stanza 4: d - d
Stanza 5: a-b-A2
Stanza 6: e - e
Stanza 7: a-b-A1
Stanza 8: f - f
Stanza 9: a-b-A2
Stanza 10: a-b-A1-A2,
For a total of 10 stanzas, where A1 and A2 are the repeated lines from the first Tercet.

This photograph was taken by the author himself on April 22, 2012.


Chapter 317
Fingers of Fire

By Treischel



Light the hedges in colors bright,
While igniting our spirits too,
With the wonders these blooms incite!

They throw a glow of sheer delight.
When the colors of fire come through,
Light the hedges in colors bright!

The yellows give off glowing light,
And oranges add to the hue
With the wonders these blooms incite.

Fingers of fire often excite.
So too will these bright flowers do,
Light the hedges in colors bright.

When these fiery blooms come into sight
Be inspired and enjoy the view
With the wonders these blooms incite.

Colorful Dahlias just might
Inspire as well as imbue.
Light the hedges in colors bright,
With the wonders these blooms incite!

Author Notes To me, these Dahlia blooms look like little campfires in a bush. Maybe that's the origin of Abraham's burning bush. Those orange and yellow petals look like fingers of flame. Spectacular!

This poem is a Villanelle.
A Villanelle is a nineteen-line poetic form consisting of five tercets followed by a Quatrain. There are two refrains (A1 and A2) and two repeating rhymes (a and b), with the first and third line of the first tercet repeated alternately until the last stanza, which includes both repeated lines. The Villanelle is an example of a fixed verse form. It is structured by two repeating rhymes and two refrains: the first line of the first stanza serves as the last line of the second and fourth stanzas, and the third line of the first stanza serves as the last line of the third and fifth stanzas.
The rhyme-and-refrain pattern of the Villanelle can be schematized as:

(A1)b(A2) ab(A1) ab(A2) ab(A1) ab(A2) ab(A1)(A2)
where letters ("a" and "b") indicate the two rhyme sounds, upper case indicates a refrain ("A"), and superscript numerals (1 and 2) indicate Refrain A1 and Refrain A2.

There is no specific meter required for a Villanelle.

This picture was taken by the author himself on October 16, 2014.


Chapter 318
Bumble Bees

By Treischel



I often watch the humble bumble bees
That glide and swoop with ease upon the breeze.
Their presence on the clover guarantees
The propagation of its properties.
It's easy here to spot the likes of these.
Their bodies are distinctive when one sees
The black and yellow furred extremities,
Or hear clear buzzing wing-borne frequencies.

With nests that might be found in ground or trees,
Disturbing them can cause extreme unease
From stings applied by frequent pain degrees
Which lead to dire health emergencies.

So, carefully watch these bees, if you please.
Their actions bolster our economies.

Author Notes The Bumble Bee is an interesting insect. It is a member of the bee genus Bombus, in the family Apidae. The generic name Bombus, assigned by Pierre Andre Latreille in 1802, is derived from the Latin word for a buzzing or humming sound. The body is round and furry, so it can stand more extreme temperatures, and it will be found in more northern climates. It has a longer tongue (or probiscus) than the honey bee, so it can get nectar from flowers and plants that other bees can't, most notably tomato plants, clover, and alfalfa. Other bees require a more open flower. So they are extremely important to the Tomato Industry. They usually won't sting, except to defend their hives, which are often on the ground where they can inadvertently be disturbed by lawnmowers or hiker's steps. A bumble bee can sting a person several times, as their stingers aren't barbed like the honey bee's. Their venom is quite strong and can send a human to the emergency room.
The nests, which usually contain about fifty insects, only last one season. Source: Wikipedia.

This poem is an Asean Sonnet.
The Asean Sonnet was created by Jose Rizal M. Reyes. Its two unique features are: that it contains a format of an Octive( 8 lines), plus a Quatrain (4 lines), closed by a couplet (2 lines); and it is completely momo-rhymed for all 14 lines. This makes for a poem where a single rhyme throughout requires a very careful choice of rhyme words and subject matter. Volta begins at line 9.

This picture was taken by the author himself on May 27, 2012.


Chapter 319
Striving Upward

By Treischel



Take the bending trail,
Follow without fail
Uphill.
Efforts that prevail,
Often will avail,
To thrill
In every detail,
And never curtail
Your will.



Author Notes Never give up. Find that winding trail uphill. I thought this photograph, which is the true Muse for this poem, conveyed a trail that winds.

This poem is a Lai.
A Lai is a lyrical, narrative poem. Lais were mainly composed in France and Germany, during the 13th and 14th centuries. The English term "Lay" is a 13th-century loan from Old French "Lai". The origin of the French term itself is unclear; perhaps it is itself a loan from German Leich. It is the building block for the later Virelai. This form looks to be a very simple form comprising of a five syllabled couplet followed by a two syllable line (5-5-2) for nine lines. The Lai is a very old French form and tradition states that the short line must not be indented, it must be left dressed to the poem. This is known as Arbre Fourchu (Forked Tree), a pattern meant to be set up as a tree.

The number of lines is fixed at nine. The rhyme pattern is...
a. a. b. a. a. b. a. a. b.
A single stanza Lai is also known as a Bergette, while multiple stanzas are known as Virelai.

This photo was taken by author himself on October 13, 2015.


Chapter 320
Dinner Cruise

By Treischel



A dinner served on river's tide
Ranks first among our fervent wishes,
To a float along enjoying dishes,
Replete with elegance inside.

To take an autumn season's ride
That gently glides above the fishes,
Ranks first among our fervent wishes,
A dinner served on river's tide.

Such pleasures cannot be denied,
To toast the day with wineglass swishes,
Eat ship-borne dishes, so delicious,
Where decks can let you be outside.

They're things to recollect with pride,
That count among our many riches -
To a float along enjoying dishes,
Replete with elegance inside.

A dinner served on river's tide
Ranks first among our fervent wishes,
To a float along enjoying dishes,
Replete with elegance inside.


Author Notes This is the third poem about our dinner cruise on the Mississippi River. Here is a shot of the inside of the boat, where we sat and dined.

This poem is a Rondeau Quatrain.
A Rondeau Quatrain has all the typical earmarks of a Rondeau poem, with only two rhymes throughout (an A and a B rhyme), as well as repeating lines used a refrains. Unlike the Rondeau proper, this poem repeats the entire line, rather than a portion. The Quatrain format utilizes an enveloping rhyme scheme of: abba. It also utilizes all four of the first stanza as it interweaves through the poem. A1, A2, B1, and B2 represent the four repeated lines and their associated rhymes. here is the poem's entire rhyme scheme:
A1,B1, B2,A2 -- a,b,B1,A1-- a,b,b,a -- a,b,B2,A2 -- A1,B1,B2,A2

This photograph was taken by the author himself on October 18, 2015.


Chapter 321
When Apples Fall

By Treischel



The season's change is evident,
When apples fall upon the ground.
You wonder where the summer went,
As hunting season comes around.

Wild creatures seek the sustenance,
When apples fall upon the ground.
Instinctive drives become intense,
As hunting season comes around.

The need to store up winter fat,
When apples fall upon the ground,
Drives deer to any habitat
As hunting season comes around.

A buck decides to take a chance,
As hunting season comes around,
To taste the fruit of circumstance,
When apples fall upon the ground.


Author Notes This deer is actually eating apples in the yard across the street from my home. I though that this buck has a very nice rack of horns. He obviously is storing up fat for the harsh Minnesota winter to come. This is a suburban area of St. Paul, so hunting is not an issue here for this fellow, but being late September, it is hunting season, so he is very fortunate. I see deer here eating apples every year in the fall. Often several of them.

This poem is a Double Refrain Kyrielle.
A Kyrielle Poem carries a repeated line through each stanza, usually the last line of each. The Double Refrain Kyrielle carries two, with the repeating line reversed in the last stanza. These repeated lines I have designated here as B1 and B2. It is written in iambic tetrameter, for as many stanzas as the author desires. The rhyme scheme is then:

a,B1,a,B2 -- c,B1,c,B2 -- d,B1,d,B2 -- e,B2,e,B1.
The difficulty here is to make the double repeat transitions well enough so as not to become overbearing.

This photograph was taken by the author himself on September 20, 2015.


Chapter 322
The Cruise

By Treischel



We will board the boat,
bringing overcoat.
It's cold.
For autumn float,
on leaves to dote,
so bold.
As we take note
of what Nature wrote
in gold.

Tickets have been sold
to the young and old,
to see
the scenery unfold.
So, aboard they strolled,
happy.
To at last behold
the wonders foretold
to be.

Cruising so carefree,
we wandered lazily
downstream,
as Nature's tapestry,
in all its majesty,
was seen.
Thus providing me
opportunity
to dream.


And so, it would seem
a poetic theme
to quote,
of highest esteem,
whose glisten and gleam
connote
the things that I deem
as most wondrous schemes,
emote.




Author Notes My wife and I went from an autumn river cruise along the Mississippi on Sunday. It was a three hour brunch cruise. This is the boat the we road on. It was a sunny day, and the temperature got up to around 60 degrees Fahrenheit. Here is a poem that I wrote about it.

This poem is a Virelai.
A Virelai is a form of medieval French verse used often in poetry and music. It is one of the three formes fixes (the others were the Ballade and the Rondeau) that represent French repeating poetry. It was one of the most common verse forms set to music in Europe from the late thirteenth to the fifteenth centuries. The form is composed of long and short lines (most frequently 5 five syllables, then two) in either nine or twelve line stanzas. The long lines of the second stanza take their rhyme from the short lines of the first stanza. This pattern continues through out the poem until the final stanza - where the short lines take their rhyme from the long lines of the first stanza. so, for this poem, the meter throughout is 5-5-2, and the total rhyme scheme is:
aabaabaab - bbcbbcbbc - ccdccdccd - ddaddadda.

This photograph was taken by the author himself on October 18,2015.


Chapter 323
Seagulls in the Lock

By Treischel



This flock of seagulls in the lock,
when all cavort in frantic flight,
their airborne antics are a sight.

Their noise gives passengers a shock,
From high pitch shrieking, giving fright.
This flock of seagulls in the lock.

It's just our presence that they mock,
disturbing peace where they alight,
when all cavort in frantic flight.

While doing so, they often squawk,
maneuver quickly left and right.
Their airborne antics are a sight.

This flock of seagulls in the lock,
when all cavort in frantic flight,
their airborne antics are a sight.

Author Notes These are seagulls that I saw cavorting in Lock and Dam #3, on the Mississippi River, just above Red Wing, Minnesota. My wife and I were on a cruise boat, from Treasure Island Casino, to take in the autumn colors. We were disappointed in that. It seems the leaves this year are going directly from green to brown, but the cruise and brunch provided were delightful.

This poem is a Rondeau Tercet.
A Rondeau Tercet retains the pedigree of its French repeating namesake, the Rondeau, only in Tercet stanzas. In this Rondeau format, all three of the lines of the first stanza take their turn in the repeat sequences, and then close out the poem once again. The classical Rondeau transitions are required to create the result. The rhyme scheme accommodates this as follows:
A,B1,B2 -- a,b,A -- a,b,B1 -- a,b,B2 -- A,B1,B2
The lines are typically written in iambic tetrameter.

This photo was taken by the author himself on October 18, 2015.


Chapter 324
River Bluffs

By Treischel



These sandstone bluffs are cloaked in trees,
While waves that ripple in the breeze
Adorn the river down below,
Providing beautiful tableau,
Prevailing in these inland seas.

These sandstone bluffs are cloaked in trees,
While waves that ripple in the breeze
Adorn the river down below.
It's where the artists often go
To capture scenes here, such as these.

Where inspiration comes with ease,
As driftwood beaches in the lees
Adorn the river down below,
Providing beautiful tableau,
Prevailing in these inland seas.

Such sights are some emotions seize.
The kind the manic muse decrees.
As poets and true artists know,
The mood wherever rivers flow,
Is one that is designed to please.

These sandstone bluffs are cloaked in trees,
While waves that ripple in the breeze
Adorn the river down below,
Providing beautiful tableau,
Prevailing in these inland seas.


Author Notes These types of sandstone bluffs can be seen along the northern portion of the Mississippi River flowage. This one happens to be at Lake City, Minnesota. Often they can be seen on both sides. If you look closely, you'll see a road that follows the shoreline. In a short while, the autumn colors will burst out in brilliant display. This is still a summer-like view.

This poem is a Rondeau Cinquain.
A Rondeau is a form of medieval and Renaissance French repeating poetry, while a Cinquain is a five line poem with an aabba rhyme scheme. This format combines the classic features of the two. All lines are written in iambic tetrameter. The Rondeau features remain, with the limitation of only 2 rhymes (a & b) throughout, along with repeating lines. The Cinquain brings its rhyme scheme. What makes this format very unique, is the number of lines that repeat, as well as the way they intertwine. There are three A rhymes that repeat, designated as A1, A2,and A3. There are also two B rhymes that repeat, shown as B1 and B2. The total rhyme scheme is:
A1,A2,B1,B2,A1 -- A1,A2,B1,b,a -- a,a,B1,B2,A3 -- a,a,b,b,a -- A1,A2,B1,B2,A1.
So the challenge is not only the rhyming, but also the interweaving of the transitions to achieve a coherent composition. Furthermore the repeated lines must be strong enough to carry forth the beauty of their repetition, as required in the French tradition.

This photograph was taken by the author himself on October 1, 2015.


Chapter 325
Teach Thy Children

By Treischel


Teach Thy Children 'Bout the world

From child inquiries
All its mysteries
Unfurled

Teach Thy Children 'Bout the world

Ancient histories
Fabled Victories
That whirled

Teach Thy Children 'Bout the world

Bird Aviaries
With feathered species
Claws curled

Teach Thy Children 'Bout the world

Then their memories
Let young faculties
Be swirled

Teach Thy Children 'Bout the world


Author Notes This was a campfire Nature Session about Eagles and hawks. As you can see the children gathered around the teacher to discover about raptor. Their curiosity was intense, and I was inspired by the event.

This poem is a Lyrical Virelai.
As I was researching the Virelai structures of French repeating poetry, I discovered that modern Virelais take on an aabb rhyme scheme, and a 5-5-2 meter. I then found that in the earliest times, they were often sung with a repeating refrain in between each stanza, with a rhyme scheme of:
A abb A abb A abb A (and so on, using only 2 rhymes).
The meter of the refrain wasn't identified, but I thought a 7 syllable line might work well with a 5-5-2 construct. So my meter is:
7 5-5-2 7 5-5-2 7 5-5-2 7.

This picture was taken by the author himself on August 28, 2015, at Lake Elmo Park. Researve.


Chapter 326
Our Quiet Beach

By Treischel

In the morning, a walking I go,
With my dog. We are takin' it slow,
On the beach, in the sun.
As we stride here beside water's flow,
He keeps pullin' to go to and fro.
On the leash, he can't run.
But he knows of the joy walks bestow.
When it's done, our reactions will show
We are both havin' fun.

We enjoy when the day has begun.
It's a treat when we meet anyone
As we walk by the lake.
Here the path that we take is such fun.
While the view here is second to none,
And no matter what we take
Is a way that is not overrun.
There are people out there, but few come
To this spot we partake.


Author Notes This man is walking his dog along the shoreline at Lake Pepin, near Lake City Minnesota. Lake Pepin is large widening of the Mississippi River. The city of Lake City is located 65 miles (105 km) southeast of the Twin Cities. Lac de Pleurs (Lake of Tears) was the name given to Lake Pepin by Father Louis Hennepin, who camped on the shore of the lake in 1680. He christened the large body of water Lac de Pleurs after observing his Sioux captors weeping near the lake over the death of a chief's son. It is widely known for its attractive surroundings and bountiful fishing for every fresh water species. Lake City was the home of the inventor of waterskiing, Ralph Samuelson, and is thus known as "The Birthplace of Waterskiing." The Sea Wing disaster occurred on July 13, 1890 when a strong squall line overturned the excursion vessel Sea Wing on Lake Pepin. Over 200 people were aboard the vessel when it was overturned, and as a result 98 people drowned. The area was plentiful with clam shells, and a button industry grew up around there.

This poem is a Virelai Ancien Poem.
In researching this poetic form, I didn't find a great deal of detail. Here's the information that I discovered recently.
A Virelai is a form of medieval French verse used often in poetry and music. By the mid-15th century, the form had become largely divorced from music. The 17th-century prosodist Pre Mourgues defined what he called the Virelai Ancien in a way that has little in common with the musical Virelais of the 14th and 15th centuries. His Virelai Ancien is a structure without a refrain and with an interlocking rhyme scheme between the stanzas: in the first stanza, the rhymes are aab-aab-aab, with the "b" lines shorter than the "a" lines. In the second stanza, the "b" rhymes are shifted to the longer verses, and a new "c" rhyme is introduced for the shorter ones (bbc-bbc-bbc), and so on.

There were no examples provided, and no information about meter, other than two long and then one short. So I thought I'd try using an anapestic meter (da da Dum, da da Dum), with a 9-9-6 structure. So, here is my attempt at one. If anyone else has more information on it, let me know.

This photograph was taken by the author himself on October 1, 2015.


Chapter 327
Beneath an Open Canopy

By Treischel



Please come and dine with me, my dear,
Upon this quiet balcony,
To share a glass of vintage cheer
Beneath an open canopy.

We'll watch the river affably
When weather's warm and sky is clear.
We'll munch our morsels happily.
Please come and dine with me, my dear!

The time is right now, never fear.
Our hearts now beat in harmony.
The bridge to happiness is near,
Upon this quiet balcony.

Let's toast the evening's majesty,
While dining on this lovely pier.
Let's take this opportunity
To share a glass of vintage cheer.

I'll let you know my heart's sincere,
While stealing kisses valiantly,
And hoping stars will soon appear,
Beneath an open canopy.


Author Notes My wife and I recently dined here along the Mississippi at Hastings, Minnesota, at the American Legion. It was a little chilly that night, so nobody was out on deck. But I still snapped this shot of the view. The bridge is only about 1 year old, having replaced the old one. In the distance is the Lock and Dam. Hastings is a city near the confluence of the Mississippi and St. Croix Rivers. The area around Hastings was first settled by a military detachment sent from Fort Snelling to guard a blocked shipment of supplies in the winter of 1820. The name "Hastings" was drawn out of a hat from suggestions placed in it by several of the original founders. In 1895 a spiral bridge was built over the Mississippi River, designed to slow down horse-drawn traffic as it entered downtown. The novel design became a tourist attraction, but the bridge was demolished in 1951 because it could not handle modern vehicles. In 1930, the Army Corps of Engineers completed Lock and Dam No. 2 at Hastings.

This poem is a Rondeau Redouble
Rondeau Redouble is a poem with a very complex fixed format. It is written on two rhymes (the a and b rhymes), but in five stanzas of four lines each and one of five lines that repeats a portion of the first line of the poem. Each of the first four lines (which due to the a and b rhymes will be identified in the following stanzas as A1, B1, A2 and B2) get individually repeated in turn once in the following stanzas by becoming successively the respective fourth lines of stanzas 2, 3, 4, and 5; and the first part of the first line is repeated as a short fifth line to conclude the sixth stanza. The stanzas each carry an abab rhyme scheme. So with the repeat line shown in numbered capitals, this can be represented as:

A1,B1,A2,B2 - b,a,b,A1 - a,b,a,B1 - b,a,b,A2 - a,b,a,B2 - b,a,b,a,(A1).

This photograph was taken by the author himself on October 1, 2015.
This poem can have any meter. But Iambic tetramer or pentameter are the most popular.


Chapter 328
Floral Fire

By Treischel


Beneath thy veil of Summer's green attire,
Adorning trees with leaves of red and gold,
'Tis Autumn's bursting glimpse of floral fire.
Magnificent displays to oft' behold!

Whence sunlight spreads its rays into its boughs,
Thy hidden colors have become revealed.
What splendor! Causing passions to arouse.
Where'er they once were ever well concealed.

But oh, so short thy season of the leaves,
When soon thy remnants rustle in the breeze,
As Mother Nature grants nought one reprieve,
But drops in pastel piles 'neath naked trees.

For Lo, we know yon season hath an end,
As Winter lurks just 'round the barren bend.


Author Notes A local Maple Tree in full Autumn color.

I treat the seasons as deities, hence capitalization.

Floral - of flowers or flora. Here I intend flora.

Pastel - soft or pale. Here I observe that leaves turn a light brown once they are on the ground for a while.

Author's photograph.


Chapter 329
Where is God?

By Treischel



where is our God today
does He teach
in church where I can speak to him
repenting sins and pray
preachers preach
but I still don't feel Elohim

is He the wilderness
where His works
of creation are on display
where His words coalese
nature lurks
his rhythms flow there every day

is He within our heart's
loving soul
dwelling with an eternal spark
within those very parts
that control
the means to discern light from dark


Author Notes These are all places to find him.

Elohim - A Hebrew name for God.

This poem is a Tri-fall Poem per contest instructions.

The Author's photograph.


Chapter 330
White Bird

By Treischel



On twisted branch the white bird stands,
A specter in the hinterlands.
Through mists of time its story's told.
Its ancient countenance is bold.

Some say it carries dragon blood,
Predating even Noah's flood.
For sure, its origin is old.
Its ancient countenance is bold.

It looks impressive as it soars,
Like Pterodactyl dinosaurs,
With legs behind, broad wings unfold.
Its ancient countenance is bold.

On twisted branch the white bird stands,
Its ancient countenance is bold.

Author Notes This is a Great White Egret standing on a tree fall along the Mississippi river. You might notice that there are a couple of turtles nearby too. It is a large Heron with all-white plumage. Standing up to 1 m (3.3 ft) tall, this species can measure 80 to 104 cm (31 to 41 in) in length and have a wingspan of 131 to 170 cm (52 to 67 in). Rising above the earth and soaring through the skies, birds have been symbols of power and freedom throughout the ages. In many myths and legends, birds link the human world to the divine or supernatural realms that lie beyond ordinary experience. Myths from several regions associate birds with the creation of the world. In ancient Egypt it was said that when land rose out of the primeval waters of chaos, the first deity to appear was a bird perching on that land. The Egyptians called the god the Benu bird and portrayed it as a long-legged, wading heron in the sun temple at Heliopolis. Birds have recently been recognized as living descendants of the Dinosaurs. If you have ever seen a Great White Egret in flight, you'd be amazed at how closely its profile resembles a Pterodactyl.

This poem is a Kyrielle Sonnet. See contest requirements. The volta, or turn, is a bit subtle. The first two stanzas discuss its myths and origins. The third focuses upon its appearance.

This photograph was taken by the author himself on April 4, 2012.


Chapter 331
Night's Transition

By Treischel


Dusk
quiet end
setting fading evening
colorful sunset, transient light
rising glowing shining
new day
Dawn

Author Notes Dusk to Dawn the river takes the mood and the sky colors.

Author's photograph


Chapter 332
Fall's Magic

By Treischel


On bright fall day, just find a way
to take the colors in.
Then without fail, go find the trail
to where it all begins.

A gentle breeze blows through the trees,
where hues are showing well.
Upon the path, the amaranth
has cast a magic spell.

For every bush has turned a blush
from lime to tangerine,
or grasped a hold of marigold,
if not of icterine.

So kick a sheaf of brittle leaf
that crackles as you go.
While leaves of rust return to dust
in Fate's autumnal flow.



Author Notes Celebrating the glorious colors of spring here as the trees show off their colors and the path is strewn with leaves.

Things specified in this poem:
Amarath - is a rose-red color of the flower of the amaranth plant.
The first written use of amaranth as a color name in English was in 1690. The name is derived from the name in Greek mythology of a flower that was believed to never die, that grew in the abode of the Greek gods on Mount Olympus.

Blush - to turn a reddish color

Lime - a bright shade of green.

Tangerine - Tangerine is an orange color hue used to give the impression of the tangerine fruit. Because of the brightness of the color variants, they are often employed to make a small but centrally important object stand out, especially when surrounded by the flat colors of earth tones. One of the original "fruit-flavored" iMacs released in 1999 was the Tangerine iMac. (Apple could not call it "Orange" due to the existence of the rival firm Orange Micro).

Icterine - is a color, described as yellowish, jaundice-yellow or marked with yellow. It is derived from Ancient Greek "ikteros" (jaundice), via the Latin ictericus. It is used as an adjective in the names of birds with yellowish plumage.

Marigold - is a yellow-orange color. It is named after the flower of the same name.
The first recorded use of golden as a color name in English was in 1300. Source: Wikipedia.

This poem is a Triquatrain.
The Triquatrain form was created by Robert L. Huntsman. It is a quatrain poem in tri-rhyme (or 3 rhymes) per quatrain with a specific rhyming pattern. Lines 1 and 3 have internal rhyme, whereas lines 2 and 4 do not.
Rhyme Pattern:
Stanza 1:
(a,a) - inline rhyme
b
(c,c) - inline rhyme
b

Stanza 2:
(d,d) - inline rhyme
e
(f,f) - inline rhyme
e

Stanza 3:
(g,g) - inline rhyme
h
(i,i) - inline rhyme
h

. . . and so on. Minimun 3 stanzas.

The meter is: 8/6/8/6 in each stanza.

This photograph was taken by the author himself on October 16, 2014.


Chapter 333
He Came Home

By Treischel




          The pride in his uniform,
He wore that first day,
Glowed like a beacon
As he went away.
          Now his legacy
          Too soon has become
          A gun salute, folded flag, and taps.
A hero to some.

          They meet him at the airport,
Dark day, so forlorn.
Body in coffin,
The family mourn.
          Among the medals
          The warrior has worn,
          A gun salute, folded flag, and taps,
As fighting was borne

          Now the pride of his parents
Is tattered and torn.
Gone now the promise
The day he was born.
          The vast horizons
          Are not what they guessed,
          A gun salute, folded flag, and taps.
A son is at rest.


 

Author Notes With Veterans Day coming up, I was thinking about the loss that so many families feel when their loved ones come home in a casket. The mix of pride and loss is real. This is a photograph taken at a National Cemetery. I tried to show how many have served by capturing a sea of tombstones, and a mother or wife, there mourning. Let us honor and remember the sacrifice of all who have served.

Pronounce warrior as 2 syllables.

This poem is a Lyricat,
Congratulations are due for a newly invented verse form by I am Cat, a fellow FanStorian, which she calls a LyriCat (See 'Refreshing My Soul', posted on 29 October).

A LyriCat has a syllable count of:
7, 5, 5 , 5, 5, 5, 9, 5,
and the rhyme scheme of each individual stanza is:
a, b, c, b, d, e, F, e.
No set rhythm is prescribed. It has a 3 stanza minimum and the 9 syllable line (F) in each stanza is a repeating line.

The author's photograph.


Chapter 334
Outdoor Libraries

By Treischel



          Communities are sharing
The gifts within books.
Outdoor libraries
Are garnering looks.
These wooded kiosks,
Now out and about,
Encourage the transfer of knowledge
                              So go check it out.

          Out strolling the neighborhood,
A bookcase I see.
Along the walkway,
It beckons to me.
Perusing the books
Each engaging tome
Encourage the transfer of knowledge.
                             So I took one home.

          The concept is quite handy.
I found one near camp.
It got me thinking,
There's things to revamp.
Down in my basement
Each former read stack
Encourage the transfer of knowledge.
                              So I put one back.





 

Author Notes Outdoor lending libraries are starting to pop up all over. There are some now on neighborhood boulevards. I found this one at a campground. I love the concept of sharing with your neighbors the knowledge in books. It beats just storing them in a dusty basement bookcase.

This poem is a LyriCat.
Congratulations are due for a newly invented verse form by I am Cat, a fellow FanStorian, which she calls a LyriCat (See 'Refreshing My Soul', posted on 29 October).

A LyriCat has a syllable count of:
7, 5, 5 , 5, 5, 5, 9, 5,
and the rhyme scheme of each individual stanza is:
a, b, c, b, d, e, F, e.
No set rhythm is prescribed. It has a 3 stanza minimum and the 9 syllable line (F) in each stanza is a repeating line.

This photograph was taken by the author himself at Lake Elmo Park Reserve in Minnesota, on August 28, 2015.







Chapter 335
The Crane

By Treischel




Stay
please,
gold crane,
bird symbol
of long, happy life
curved neck in golden ratio,
the sunlight gleams refractions of arithmetic truths,
instilling cosmic emanations of prosperity to the owner's property




Author Notes This statue of a Crane is in my brother Richard's back yard. In China, the Crane is a symbol of longevity and prosperity. I thought that to be a fitting concept, but also was intrigued by its curving neck, which seemed appropriate to the poetic format that I used here. The poem's format keys off the Fibonacci arithmetic sequence. The Fibonacci sequence exhibits a certain numerical pattern which originated as the answer to an exercise that turned out to have an interest and importance far beyond what its creator imagined. It can be used to model or describe an amazing variety of phenomena, in mathematics and science, art and nature. The mathematical ideas the Fibonacci sequence leads to, such as the golden ratio, spirals and self- similar curves, have long been appreciated for their charm and beauty, but no one can really explain why they are echoed so clearly in the world of art and nature. Fibonacci popularized the Hindu-Arabic numeral system to the Western World primarily through his composition in 1202 of Liber Abaci (Book of Calculation). He also introduced to Europe the sequence of Fibonacci numbers. In the Fibonacci sequence of numbers, each number is the sum of the previous two numbers. He carried the calculation up to the thirteenth place, that is 233, but it can be carried out infinitely. This famous Fibonacci sequence has captivated mathematicians, artists, designers, and scientists for centuries. Also known as the Golden Ratio, its ubiquity and astounding functionality in nature suggests its importance as a fundamental characteristic of the Universe. The sequence best describes a spiral. It contains a mathematical ratio of 1.614 or PHI. It shows up in many places, like: flower petals, seed patterns in plants, pine cones, sea shells, hurricanes, fruits and vegetables, galaxies, facial proportions, animal and insect bodies, and more.

This poem is a Fibonacci Poem. I was introduced to it by Patcilaw in her poem, A Little Princess.
A Fibonacci poem uses the numbering sequence developed by Fibonacci for the syllable count of the poem. So the syllable count can be:
1-1-2-3-5-8-13-21-34.....,
to any count the poet desires, but much beyond 21 becomes unwieldy. So, they typically run somewhere between 5 and 21 syllables. there is no required rhyme or meter, but they are not prohibited.
I used the count to 21 for this poem.

This photograph was taken by the author himself on July 10, 2015


Chapter 336
Garden of Paradise

By Treischel



People often realize
that treasures abound
when autumn leaves change,
to blanket the ground,
and treetops exchange
colored arrayment
within the garden of paradise,
to their amazement.

While bedazzling any eyes,
the crisp autumn air
reveals to the nose
pine scents everywhere.
The gentle breeze blows
along wooded trails
within the garden of paradise.
Such lovely details.

You may find it a surprise,
the price and the cost,
but when God once took
what Adam had lost,
He grants yearly look,
so that we may roam
within the garden of paradise,
that once was our home.






Author Notes Fall is a beautiful time of the year. The earth puts on a display of colorful arrayment. Ever wonder why the season is so short? This thought came to me. It is a reminder from God of that beautiful Garden we had, but lost, when Adam and Eve disobeyed. So now, once a year, He gives us a short glimpse of what it must have been like.

This poem is a LyriCat Poem, but modified.
The LyriCat is a form created by I Am Cat, a fellow Fanstorian. it is arranged in a minimum of 3 Octaves (8 lines) with a fixed syllable count of:
7/5/5/5/5/5/9/5.
It also has a fixed rhyme scheme of:
abcbdeFe,
where F is a line that is repeated in every Stanza,
In this poem I modified the rhyme scheme to:
abcbcdAd,
where A becomes the repeated line and it rhymes with line 1. Also in the original Lyricat, the third and fifth lines don't rhyme , but in mine they rhyme with each other. So in this poem there are no lines that don't rhyme somewhere. I wanted to see how that works out.

This photograph was taken by the author on October 16, 2014.


Chapter 337
Baby News

By Treischel



Granddaughter Nicole,
makes me, I gather,
when she takes on mother role,
the great-grandfather.

Putting a new living soul
on family tree,
when she takes on mother role,
related to me.

Let all the hilltops extoll,
a precious new life,
when she takes on mother role,
as Drew's happy wife.

I just heard the news.
Rejoicing ensues.


Author Notes My granddaughter, Nicole, got married to Drew about 2 years ago, and moved off from Minnesota to Baltimore, to be with him. I just recently received a text from her mother, Jodi, that she is pregnant. She sent out the typical ultrasound image with the announcement. That will make me a great-grandpa. This is a picture of Nicci with her mom.

This Poem is a LyriCat Sonnet,
I must give great credit to Pantygynt, a fellow Fanstorian, for creating a Sonnet version of I'm a Cat's new Lyricat format. Creative juices are really flowing on the site these days.
The LyriCat Sonnet creates three Quatrains with a repeating line, and a couplet. it minicks the 7-5-9 meter of the LyriCat with the following meter structure:
7/5/9/5 - 7/5/9/5 - 7/5/9/5 - 5/5.
The rhyme scheme is:
abAb acAc adAd ee,
where the A represents the repeated line. Volta on line 9.

This picture is from my daughter, Jodi's photographs.


Chapter 338
Terror, Horror, and False Faith

By Treischel



The Jihad error brings horror
In the city of light,
Where terror's run with bombs and guns
Creates horrific sights.

A pleasant day turns to dismay,
As sudden death stalks streets,
Where bursting loud among the crowd
Are suicide deadbeats.

For who is free? We cannot be
Unsafe at social sites,
Like restaurants and local haunts,
Or under concert lights.

And it's a shame when soccer games
Become a hunting ground
For evil men who ambush when
There's no defense around.

Their thoughts of God are deeply flawed,
Since they have been misled.
As Satan's plans in ISIS hands
Brings only blameless dead.

To be secure, the only cure
May be, eradicate
The cause and source of false discourse
Before it's way too late.





Author Notes The horror that the Jihadists are perpetrating around the world is so outrageous, that drastic measures must be taken to eliminate this Satanic threat to all mankind. The recent incidents in Paris should serve as a wake-up call to all countries.

This poem is a Triquatrain.
The Triquatrain form was created by Robert L. Huntsman. It is a quatrain poem in tri-rhyme with a specific rhyming pattern (see below). Lines 1 and 3 have internal rhyme whereas lines 2 and 4 do not.

Rhyme Pattern:

(a,a)
b
(c,c)
b

(d,d)
e
(f,f)
e

(g,g)
h
(i,i)
h

. . . and so on.

The groupings in the parenthesis are on one line separated by a comma. This poem can be of any length or subject and do not require perfect meter.

This picture is from Yahoo images.


Chapter 339
Comes Strength by ...

By Treischel







                                                                                                  Falling down like manna from the sky,
                                                                                                  Peace, reflected in my eye.
                                                                                                  While all my tears dry,
                                                                                                  Comes strength by
                                                                                                  Grace.

                                             I may not know any reasons why,
                                             But I know, the need to try.
                                             While all my tears dry,
                                            Comes strength by
                                            Faith.

Whenever reason fails to apply,
A stronger state lifts me high.
While all my tears dry,
Comes strength by
Love.

 

Author Notes This stained glass portrait, of Jesus in the Garden of Gethsemane during His personal agony, is in my daughter, Aisha's, kitchen window. She inherited it from my mother. Our Lord modeled how to deal with anguish right there for us, as He sweated blood, but received grace from His father, God.

This poem is a Triquint.
A Triquint is a poem form created by Sylvia A. Feeley, which consists of 3 verses (thus the Tri designation), in 5 lines each (thus the quint designation), with 4 mono-rhymed lines, and a 5th line that may either rhyme with the last line of each stanza, or not. The unique aspect of this format is in its interlinking of the stanzas by repeating Lines 3 and 4 of Verse 1 as a refrain in Verses 2 and 3. It also holds the mono-rhyme throughout the entire poem, making it a real challenge. There is no specified meter. The syllable count for each stanza is:
9, 7, 5, 3, 1.
It has a rhyme scheme in each stanza of:
a,a,A1,A2,x, where the capital letters indicate the repeated lines, and x indicates the variable rhyme.
So, the entire poem structure can be either:
a,a,A1,A2,b - a,a,A1,A2,b - a,a,A1,A2,b,
or
a,a,A1,A2,b - a,a,A1,A2,c - a,a,A1,A2,d.

This photograph was taken by the author himself, on April 23, 2011.


Chapter 340
Railroad Roulette

By Treischel

Rusty rails,
Dangerous chemicals,
Railroad roulette with a toxic mix
Environmental risk as age breakdown prevails,
Rolling along with clickity clicks.
While metronome ticks,
Safety fails.

Accident,
When old oil cars are rent,
Creates an environmental scare
Where any of the many toxic wastes are sent,
Through cities, or almost anywhere.
It's such a Devil's dare.
Too frequent.


Author Notes Toxic chemicals are being transported upon the railroad trails everywhere and quite frequently. It anything from oil, to amonia, to nuclear waste. It's being carried on age deteriorating lines. Any village or city is at risk, as well as our rivers and water tables. I think we need to be more aware of the danger, and put more safety measures in place.

Rent - as in torn
Metronome - an instrument used in music for keeping time.


This poem is a Triquain,
The Triquain is a format that relies primarily on syllable count. It is a seven line poem with syllables in multiples of 3. The Triquain, created by Shelley A. Cephas, is a poem with several creative variences and can be a rhyming or non-rhyming verse. This form is always centered. The simpliest layout of the form is a poem made up of 7 lines with 3, 6, 9, 12, 9, 6, and 3 syllables, in this order, any number of stanzas.

For this poem I chose 2 stanzas and a rhyme scheme of:
aababba ccdcddc.

The author took this picture himself on October 1, 2015 of oil cars crossing a bridge along the St. Croix River near Hastings Minnesota.


Chapter 341
Quiet Streets

By Treischel



Quiet streets,
with autumn's trees ablaze,
adorn the boulevards around town.
Their limbs and branches frame a scene the bards proclaim,
as the fall colored leaves flutter down,
to delight and amaze.
Quiet streets
enhance the home displays,
as lawns carpeted in brand new gown,
when fallen foliage came to set the ground aflame,
with yellows, reds, purples, orange and brown,
create some sights to gaze.
Quiet streets,
as cars on the byways
saunter down the roads of renown,
where passengers exclaim and satisfy their aim
to observe Nature's wonders that crown
the best of autumn days.
Quiet streets.

Author Notes We have had snow here in Minnesota now. It fell on Thanksgiving day, 11/26/2015. We got about an inch. Winter is definitely closing in. With that, I thought I'd post a last poem about Fall. This is a shot along Summit Avenue in St. Paul. The colors were lovely and the sky was blue when I took this photograph.

This poem is a Triquain Swirl.
It is a variant of the Triquain. The Triquain, created by Shelley A. Cephas, is a poem with several creative variances and can be a rhyming or non-rhyming verse. This is one of those variants. The simplest form of it is a poem made up of 7 lines with 3, 6, 9, 12, 9, 6,3 syllables in this order. The Triquain Swirl connects the Triquain string at the 3 syllable line as follows:
3, 6, 9, 12, 9, 6, 3, 6, 9, 12, 9, 6, 3... and so on.

Also, to be more creative, you may add a hidden thought in your swirl by taking 3 or 4 syllables in line 6 of your first Triquain in the swirl and link it to the following 3 syllable lines throughout your poem to make a thought summing up what you have written in your poem.

Triquain and Triquain Swirls are always centered. No specific meter is required.

I did not hide a thought in this one, but I did add rhyme with the 3 syllable line as a repeating refrain.
The sytllable count is:
3,6,9,12,9,6,3,6,9,12,9,6,3,6,9.12.9,6,3
The rhyme scheme is:
A,b,c,(d,d),c,b,A,b,c,(d,d),c,b,A,b,c,(d,d),c,b,A, where the letters in parenthesis indicate inline rhyme on the 12 syllable lines and the capital letters show the repeated refrain.

This photograph was taken by the author himself on October 16, 2014.


Chapter 342
Dreary Days of Winter

By Treischel




Oh, clouds containing moods
of dark sky!
They test the soul with endless gloom,
as shortened sunshine broods
angst awry,
when captured within Winter's womb.

Those days of Summer sun,
now are gone,
where twilight stretched 'til nine o'clock
on days once filled with fun
going on
as play and passion interlock.

So many days now filled with clouds,
rain or snow,
consume the day's truncated light,
as the seasonal shrouds
quench the glow
in Winter's short day and long night.


Author Notes This lament is about the shortened hours of sunlight during winter, that can create lowered moods. Called the Winter Blues, they are caused by days of waking in the dark and coming home in the dark, after work. Then too, many days are further darkened by rain or snow clouds.

This poem is a Tri-fall.
The Tri-fall is a simple poem of jagged lines, created by Jan Turner, that consists of three 6-line stanzas, for a total of 18 lines (all factors of 3). The rhyme scheme is:
a,b,c,a,b,c
and meter for each stanza is as follows:
6/3/8, 6/3/8.
This form requires little to no punctuation and can be written on any subject matter.

This photograph was taken by the author himself in December, 2012.


Chapter 343
Turkey on the Table

By Treischel


The turkey's on the table,
looking very fine.
So, carve it if you're able.
Serve it with some wine,
pumpkin pie, and some
side dishes.
Yum!


Author Notes Well sure, it was Thanksgiving.

This poem is an Epulaeryu.
The Epulaeryu poem was developed by Joseph Spence, Sr. The name of the poetic form was selected as a result of experiencing the Mediterranean and Far East cultures, and enjoying many succulent and nourishing meals and food during those memorable travels. With its use of 7,5,3,and 1 syllable counts, it takes on the FAR Eastern mystique of the Haiku, and Senryu, only with an epicurean twist. The poem is all about delicious food. It consists of seven lines with thirty-three (33) syllables. The first line has seven (7) syllables, the second line five (5), the third line seven (7), the fourth line five (5), the fifth line five (5), the sixth line three (3), and the seventh line has only one (1) syllable which ends with an exclamation mark.So, the form is: 7/5/7/5/5/3/1.
Each line has one thought which is about the main course. Therefore, this poetic form, has corresponding lines built around the main course and ending with an exclamation point, concluding with a line expressing the writer's excitement and feelings about the poem/food. The poem may be rhymed or unrhymed.

This picture was taken by the author himself on Thanksgiving, 2015.


Chapter 344
The Star

By Treischel



I
am
here
so high
in the sky
A new star
hanging above
Bethlehem town
A star, expressing God's love
My light heralds the coming of a Newborn King
Now follow this star to the humble site of the One who means everything
Raise up your voices high, hark the Angel's song
A child wearing a heavenly crown
was born at last
Find a manger
Come along
to worship
Him here
where
go
I



Author Notes O Holy Night and Silent Night inspired poem.

This is a Concrete or Shape Poem
A Concrete Poem (also known as a Shape Poem) is one where the text takes on a form that is a recognizable image.
In this poem I tried to achieve the shape of the Star of Bethlehem.


Chapter 345
To Fly

By Treischel


I wish that I could fly
On many feathered wings,
To top the mountain heights,
Then linger in the clouds,
And see imposing sights.

I wish that I could fly
Like angels from on high,
Appendages unfurled,
To drift upon the breeze
And watch the bustling world.

I wish that I could fly
On gentle painted wings
That butterflies produce
And flutter all about
Like leaves the trees let loose.

I wish that I could fly
Like eagles soaring free
So far above the trees,
Across the open sky
To unknown destinies.


Author Notes Just dreaming about having wings. Airplanes, magic carpets, rocketships, unicorns, or even Santa's sleigh wouldn't match having wings and being able to fly at will.

This poem is a Monchielle Poem.
The Monchielle form was created by Jim T. Henriksen. It is a poem that consists of four each five-line stanzas where the first line repeats in each verse. Each line within the stanzas consist of six iambic syllables (iambic trimeter) , where lines three and five rhyme. The rhyme pattern is:
Abcdc Aefgf Ahiji Aklml, where the capital letters indicate the repeated lines. This form is nicely expressive when characterizing several things that with similarities.

This photograph was taken by the author himself on September 27, 2014.


Chapter 346
Dark Moments

By Treischel



The darkest moments fly away, like
Whispered wishes on the wind.
In fevered flow, they'll flutter and go,
To places graces just can't rescind.

Dream-catchers placed on high will grab them,
As they catch upon their vines
They'll flutter and go, in fevered flow,
When the evening shadows touch their tines.

Just when the Sun at dusk is faded,
They are loosened by an angry breeze.
In fevered flow, they'll flutter and go,
To wherever the wind currents please.

So, hold onto your dreams more tightly,
But let go of all painful pasts.
They'll flutter and go, in fevered flow.
Then, seek out those cherished dreams at last.


Author Notes Just some fleeting thoughts.

This poem is a ZaniLa Rhyme.
The ZaniLa Rhyme, a form created by Laura Lamarca, consists 4 lines per stanza.
The rhyme scheme for this form is:
abcb,
and a syllable count of:
9/7/9/9 per stanza.
Line 3 of each stanza contains an internal rhyme that is repeated in each odd numbered stanza.
Even stanzas contain the same line, but swapped. So, on every other stanza the 3rd line repeats, but is reversed. I guess that's where the "Zani" comes to play. The "La" is a signature of all formats created by her.
The ZaniLa Rhyme has a minimum of 3 stanzas and no maximum poem length.

For this poem, I chose 4 stanzas. So, the rhyme scheme is as follows:

a,b,(C1,C2),b - d,e,(C2,C1),e - f,g,(C1,C2),g - h,i,(C2,C1),i,

where the capital letters indicate the repeated lines, the parenthethis indicate the inline rhymes, and the numbers identify the sequence.

This photograph was taken by the author himself on October 17, 2014.


Chapter 347
What Is This Fuss?

By Treischel



What now, is all this Global-warming fuss?
Has Earth not often waffled hot and cold
As Ice Ages have often cycled thus,
That underwent reverses very bold?

I think we give our impact overplay,
Since Nature trumps our efforts any day.

Ten thousand times worse is volcanic ash
Hurled high into our open atmosphere,
Inhibiting all sunlight in a flash.
So many times that thing has happened here.

Forever Earth has undergone such change.
Unlikely is our chance to rearrange.
So worry 'bout the weather, if you must.
Still, Earth will keep recurring boom and bust.

Author Notes I must admit that I remain a skeptic about Global Warming. The planet Earth has undergone cycles of heating and warming since it began - ice ages have come and gone several times. It has recovered from many disasters, and weather has always been unpredictable. To think that we can change this recurring cycle in any major way, is the height of human pretentiousness. Just think, one single massive volcanic eruption is ten thousand times more harmful than anything we can do. One could instantly send us back into the ice ages by covering the whole planet in vaporous clouds for years. I'm not saying that we shouldn't take better care of our planet. I'm just saying, "get real". Here's a picture of my driveway in February, 2014.

This poem is an Acrostic Sonnet.
The Acrostic Sonnet combines the elements of two poetic formats. An acrostic is a poem which spells out a word or idea. What it spells out is also the the title of the poem itself. The first letter of each line spells out this key word or words. But variations can be attempted such as having the first letter in the sentence and the last letter in the sentence spell out a word. A traditional sonnet is a poem of 14 lines. It follows a strict rhyme scheme. A Sonnet consists of 14 lines, each line containing ten syllables and written in iambic pentameter. Typically there are three abab rhymes quatrains and a closing couplet, with a volta at line 9, but for this Acrostic format, the sequence and rhyme scheme has been modified to fit the phrase. For this one, the volta is at line 7.

This photograph was taken by the author himself on February 17, 2014.


Chapter 348
Remember Him

By Treischel


December's here, with Christmas cheer,
And it's now time to celebrate
With family and closest friends.

Unwrapping toys that Santa sends,
The children all anticipate
Receiving gifts this time of year.

It's also time meant to revere
The Christ-child born upon this date,
Who died to make our sin amends.

An act of love whose gift transcends
All other gifts you contemplate.
His sacrifice was most sincere.

Enjoy the season's festive trim.
Then go to church. Remember Him.


Author Notes This picture is of the Christmas tree in the living room of my sister Marilee's house. The item in the foreground is a sculpture centerpiece on the glass table in her dining room.

This poem is a Trilonnet Sonnet.
The Trilonnet, created by Shelley A. Cephas, is a 14-line poem made up of four each three-line verses of 8 syllables (iambic tetrameter) and one rhyming couplet or four each three-lined verses of 10 syllables (iambic pentameter) and one rhyming couplet.

Each 3 line verse is an unrhymed triplet. Each triplet has a rhyme scheme of abc. It is a sonnet in that it made up of 14 lines, although the volta may occur on a line other than line 9. There are 2 possible rhyme schemes for this form:

abc abc abc abc dd (here the rhyme is repeats).
or,
abc cba abc cba dd (here the rhyme rolls, or undulates)

This form is written in either iambic tetrameter or iambic pentameter.

The author took this photograph himself in December 2013.


Chapter 349
Birch & Hydrangea

By Treischel



Beneath the birch tree flowers bloom.
They spread in rounds of bluest plume
That fill the air with sweet perfume
To grace the space that they consume.
What synergy -- that blends the two --
White dappled wood with floral hue.

Where trunks, adorned in black and white,
Curtail the winds with wooden might.
They fan out wide, allowing light
To filter through its leaves just right,
To bless the flowers with the sun,
Whose rays are reaching to each one.

Hydrangea add their beauty too.
Their pompoms do come peeking through.
Such elegance the arts pursue
When seeking subjects to imbue,
With brushes and a fertile mind,
As sights and colors are combined.

What lovely intellectual boone,
When blending things like sun and moon,
Or melodies within a tune,
That let such diff'rent things commune,
To show their personality,
And revel in diversity.


Author Notes Don't they look Lovely together?

This Poem is a LaCarta in accordance with the contest guidelines.

Author's photograph


Chapter 350
Dragon's Breath

By Treischel



In true accord, a dragon's hoard, is much adored,
But safely stored, in deepest nave of darkest cave,
Where only brave, intrepid knight would dare to fight
And claim the ancient right to hold that precious gold.

The dragon defending it, with fiery spit, would have a fit
If she were hit by wielded sword of princely lord
As he explored the possibility that his agility
And virility may have the sway to win the day.

But in the end, she will defend, fiercely contend,
And will extend her burning wrath upon the path
Her molten breath. So beware, any who may dare
To breech her lair. For dragon's breath may bring you death.




Author Notes Just a warning about seeking a dragon's hoard of gold. They are very protective of it. You might get burned.

This poem is a Vers Beaucoup.
The Vers Beaucoup, a poem form created by Curt Mongold, is derived from French for "many rhymes". It is aptly named, as each line contains three rhymes. Each stanza consists of four lines. So there are twelve rhymes per stanza. It has unique interlinking scheme as follows:

Line 1: a-a-a-
Line 2: a-b-b-
Line 3: b-c-c-
Line 4: c-d-d

Each line can only use a MAXIMUM of three rhyming words. You may have as many stanzas as you wish. The second line of a verse has a fourth "a" rhyme carried over from the first line, which causes enjambment and creates a strong internal rhyming structure. The poem does not require a specific meter. So for this poem, I chose three stanzas. Here is the entire rhyme scheme,

Stanza 1
a-a-a
a-b-b
b-c-c
c-d-d

Stanza 2:
e-e-e
e-f-f
f-g-g
g-h-h

Stanza 3
i-i-i
i-j-j
j-k-k
k-l-l

This picture is from Yahoo Images.


Chapter 351
Antique Bicycle

By Treischel

I hope you like my antique bike.
The Penny-farthing style will go a merry mile.

Author Notes The Penny-farthing, also known as a high wheel, or high wheeler, is a type of bicycle with a large front wheel and a much smaller rear wheel. It was popular in the 1880s. It was the first machine to be called a "bicycle". Although the name "Penny-farthing" is now the most common, it was probably not used until the machines were nearly outdated. It comes from the British penny and farthing coins, one much larger than the other, so that the side view resembles a penny leading a farthing. Although the trend was short-lived, the Penny-farthing became a symbol of the late Victorian era. Its popularity also coincided with the birth of cycling as a sport. Source: Wikipedia.

Unfortunately, I can't get the image large enough, so several people have said they can't read the words, so I thought I'd help out by listing the text here.

Handle bar and seat: it's neat on my seat.

Connecting bar:
Antique bicycles of the past
are made to go along
And travel fast.

Large wheel tire:
Riding on rubber tires
Of real steel
That keeps me sitting up high
And makes me feel
Alive.

Sproket: The gear is here

Spokes:
Wheels spin free, it's a reality.
There are spokes, to keep folks
On the open road, with a heavy road.

Small wheel: Let's begin to take a spin.
Small axel: Go

This poem is a Calligram.
A Calligram is a poem, phrase, or word in which the typeface, calligraphy or handwriting is arranged in a way that creates a visual image. The image created by the words expresses visually what the word, or words, say. In a poem, it manifests visually the theme presented by the text of the poem. Guillaume Apollinaire was a famous Calligram writer and author of a book of poems called Calligrammes. His poem written in the form of the Eiffel Tower is an example of a Calligram.

The image was created by the author using a WordArt program in PowerPoint. I had to use PowerPoint because I couldn't get it to work in the Word Program, I then saved it as a JPG.


Chapter 352
Tree and Ornaments

By Treischel

A tree
at Christmas time shines
with many happily adorned
ornaments
that sparkle and shimmer on limbs
of scented pine evergreen
needles.

Author Notes I took this close-up cross-section of my sister's Christmas tree to highlight this poem. It tried to capture the simple essence of it for this poetic format which resembles an ornament somewhat.

This poem is a Cameo.
The Cameo is a fixed form style of poetry with seven lines varying in syllabic length. It is one of the most simple ways of writing a poem and is frequently assigned in classrooms. It varies only in syllable count. The form is a heptastich (Hepta Greek; seven) or seven line verse and is usually unrhymed.

The Cameo Poem is written in a strictly counted syllables per line; no rhymes are needed.

line 1 = 2 syllables;
line 2 = 5;
line 3 = 8;
line 4 = 3;
line 5 = 8;
line 6 = 7;
line 7 = 2 syllables


The format is designed to be put on things, like cameos. I think it is a perfect format for things like posters, or greeting cards.

This was taken by the author himself, from my sister Marilee's tree.


Chapter 353
Pancake Ice Wafers

By Treischel




Pancake Ice
Is floating on shore
Wave-flow borne.
Rocky beach
And swirling undercurrents
Make the wafers dance.



Author Notes This kind of Ice is called "Pancake Ice" for obvious reasons. It is frequently found along the rocky shores of Lake Superior where the wave action, and cold water, crashing and swirling in currents along the beach, create these wafer patterns. A unique environment of swirling activity.

This poem is a Shadorma.
The Shadorma (the Spanish Haiku) is a poetic form consisting of a six-line stanza (or sestet). The form is alleged to have originated in Spain. Each stanza has a syllable count of 3/5/3/3/7/5 for a total of 26 syllables. A poem may consist of one stanza, or an unlimited number of stanzas (a series of shadormas). No rhyme scheme. It is a syllabic poem.It can have many stanzas, as long as each follows the meter.
Little is known about this poetic style's origins and history but it is used by many modern poets today.

This photograph was taken by the author himself on March 2, 2013.
This variation of the haiku, which is evident by its syllable pattern, can be seen in use in many writing venues.


Chapter 354
Hot Air Balloon

By Treischel

We who want to fly
reach to touch the clouds on high
drifting right nearby

Author Notes I love to watch hot-air balloons in flight. They are colorful and amazing. When I used to live on Cheyenne Mountain in Colorado Springs, there was an annual event that had dozens of them fly right by my house. What a scene!

This poem is a Calligram.
A poetic Calligram creates a form from the very words of the stanzas.
I apologize that it came out bleary, when posted on the site.
Because it is hard to read, I will spell out its design here.

The gather circle at the top reads:
At the top
winds never stop.

The four long lines that circle the balloon are each actually an abab rhymed quatrain. The four read from left to right:

All tightened up, these outer cords,
that hold the pressured cloth at bay,
providing tension to it all,
so we may float along the way.

While all around the netted weave,
The pressure billows canvas out,
From steam the heated atoms leave,
To push this platform all about.

When pilot turns the valve of fire,
The air that fills the cavity,
Balloon takes you where you desire,
Once loosed from bonds of gravity.

A glowing colored bubble in the air,
Drifts smoothly up among the fluffy clouds.
It looks completely awesome floating there,
Its shining sight will draw some seeking crowds.

The bottom ring reads:
The heat released from dragon's jaw,
is sucked right through its gaping maw.

The four ropes to the basket create an aabb rhymed quatrain, where each line is one rope, reads:
Held with these ties that bind.
The best that man can find.
The ropes keep holding fast,
With tensile strength that lasts.

The basket has an abab rhymed quatrain that reads:
Even as the air is weighted down,
My spirit is lifted high.
By steam within a colored canvas gown,
As heat pushes us up to the sky.

Now for the designs.
The diamond reads:

On
The wind
To drift and sail
Among the sallow clouds
Balloon leaves not print nor trail
While floating on the breeze above the trees
With colored canvas in tight tether
It's as light as downy feather
With a wicker bin
Just right to
Travel
In

The top design is a mono-stitch that reads:
Flying high in my beautiful hot air balloon. Bye-bye.

The bottom design is a mono-stitch that reads:
On the go with hot air flow.

Under the basket is a 5-7-5 Poem that reads:
We who want to fly
reach to touch the clouds on high
drifting right nearby

I hope you enjoyed this complex poem.


Chapter 355
Trumpeter Swans

By Treischel



This pull of water draws a crowd,
As wild ones heed the trumpet call,
All voices echo clear and loud,
To gather where the feathers fall.

These swooping Swans in landing -- sprawl,
Break river's surface, as it's ploughed,
Until they sit where flocks recall.
This pull of water draws a crowd.

The breed's male birds are all endowed
With whitest feathers over all,
But sleek black beak, that whoops aloud,
As wild ones heed the trumpet call.

A waterfowl that's big and tall,
Long graceful neck will curve when bowed,
Distinctive species quelled downfall.
All voices echo clear and loud!

Their mass extinction's not allowed,
When Fates were gathered to forestall
Their species greatest, darkest cloud,
To gather where the feathers fall.

This sight that keeps me so enthralled,
This photograph, of which I'm proud,
Like their instinctive wherewithal,
Shows everything that's been avowed.
This pull of water.


Author Notes These magnificent white birds are Trumpeter Swans. I wanted to celebrate their return from the brink of extinction. These ones are landing on the Mississippi River at Monticello, Minnesota, where the water is warm all year long and the river doesn't freeze over in the winter, due to the hot water released by the local Nuclear Power Plant. I made a journey there to photograph them. So that is also a part of my Muse.

The Trumpeter Swan (Cygnus buccinator) is a species of swan found in North America. The heaviest living bird native to North America, it also is on average, the largest extant species of waterfowl with a wingspan that may exceed 10 ft (3.0 m). It is the American counterpart and a close relative of the Whooper Swan (Cygnus cygnus) of Eurasia. By 1933, fewer than 70 wild Trumpeters were known to exist, and extinction seemed imminent, until aerial surveys discovered a Pacific population of several thousand Trumpeters around Alaska's Copper River. Careful reintroductions by wildlife agencies and the Trumpeter Swan Society gradually restored the North American wild population to over 46,000 birds by 2010. It is one of the heaviest living birds or animals capable of flight. The adult trumpeter swan is all white in plumage, and has a large, wedge-shaped black bill. Trumpeter Swans have similar calls to Whooper Swans and Bewick's Swans. They are loud and somewhat musical creatures, with their cry sounding similar to a trumpet, which gave the bird its name. Source: Wikipedia.

This poem is a Rondeau Redouble.
It is a poem with a very complex fixed format. It is written on two rhymes (the a and b rhymes), but in five stanzas of four lines each and one of five lines that repeats a portion of the first line of the poem. Each of the first four lines (which due to the a and b rhymes will be identified in the following stanzas as A1, B1, A2 and B2) get individually repeated in turn once in the following stanzas by becoming successively the respective fourth lines of stanzas 2, 3, 4, & 5; and the first part of the first line is repeated as a short fifth line to conclude the sixth stanza.
The stanzas each carry an abab rhyme scheme.
So with the repeat line shown in numbered capitals, this can be represented as -
A1,B1,A2,B2 - b,a,b,A1 - a,b,a,B1 - b,a,b,A2 - a,b,a,B2 - b,a,b,a,(A1).
This poem can have any meter.

The author took this photograph himself on February 16, 2012, a time when the river is usually frozen over.


Chapter 356
Peace - Peace Please

By Treischel




Peace

Peace please
Peace seize

Peace unfurled
Peace on earth
Peaceful world

Peace accomplish
Peace is my wish
Peace every way
Peace every day

Peace to end the fear
Peace with love and cheer
Peaceful reunion
Peace resolution
Peace in this New Year

Peace Please
Peace



Author Notes 2015 was such a violent year, lets pray 2016 finds peace. I hope all of us, but especially our political leaders, have this resolution.

This poem is a Hexaverse with an added Envoi.
A Hexaverse is a type of poem that relates stanza lines to syllable count in increasing volume. It starts with a 1 syllable, 1 line stanza (also the Title of the poem); then 2 syllables, 2 lines; then 3 syllables, 3 lines; then 4 syllables, 4 lines; and then 5 syllables, 5 lines. It can have as many stanzas as the author wants. No rhyme scheme is required. The Title is also the first line of the Poem (I couldn't do that here, because I already had a poem with the name posted). Many Hexaverse poems also start each line with the same word. While this is not a requirement, it is an option. A related version is the Diminishing Hexaverse, which starts with longest stanzas, and works its way down to one word.

For this poem, I chose the option to start each line with the same word. I also chose a rhyme scheme, which is:
a bb cdc eeff gghhg.
In addtion, I added a two line Envoi for poetic impact, using the first and third line of the piece, in reverse order.

This photograph was taken by the author himself on January 26, 2012.


Chapter 357
Baby's Smile

By Treischel



A baby's smile "  It's most worthwhile " There is no bile

Sweet juvenile "   All the while             " Charming style

It's never vile    "   A fine profile            " It's full of guile




 

Author Notes This is my granddaughter Skylah in 2013 just about a month after she was born. Like I said, there is nothing sweeter than a baby's smile.

This poem is a Tic-Tac-Toe Poem.
It was created by the author in 2014. This format will read as a poem no matter what direction it is read from. It requires a grid like a Tic-Tac-Toe game, unfortunate I couldn't do it on the site's editor. The rules are to create a poem where each line has three each, three word phrases. The poem has a total of three lines. Each three word phrase lines up in a Tic-tac-toe like matrix where the poem reads from every direction (up, down, across, diagonally, and backwards) in a poetic statement.
It is a good word/brain exercise.

This picture was taken by my daughter Aisha on her cell phone.


Chapter 358
A Christmas Scrabble Game with God

By Treischel




When Our Lord Jesus died upon the cross,
Descending, He freed Adam then from Hell.
Recovering from pain of Heaven's loss,
His sin erased, so none could ever tell.

Oh Come Emmanuel!

So God and Adam, once again good friends,
Would sit for hours with just a simple aim,
Enjoying time that one another spends
At Scrabble's famous word formation game.

So one December not too long ago,
They met again as they had often done.
They scattered all the pieces to and fro,
Selecting their own game tiles one by one.

Angels watched on high.

So God placed the first word upon the board,
The
 WISEMEN were the ones to come along.
As Adam's CHRISTMAS struck a proper chord,
The season's emanations were quite strong.

Which gave God thoughts of BETHLEHEM,
But Adam thought it's time for making MERRY.
Then God's LOVE was revealed to all of them,
While Adam saw the word GOD in a hurry.

Rest Ye merry Gentlemen.

God scratched His head, and then put up a LEG,
While Adam only thought about his PRESENTS
Our God sent forth a special shining STAR.
Soon Adam saw the BABY in his presence.

Then God released an ANGEL to inform,
While Adam was preoccupied with MARY,
God organized the SHEPHERDS early morn,
As Adam noticed JOSEPH in the story.

Oh Holy Night!


Then God exclaimed that JESUS was His son,
Just like the Bible verse that Adam READ.
God's planned NATIVITY had just begun,
Then Adam used his Y for RYE instead.

Now God ran out of actions, so HE passed.
Embarrassed, Adam slowly set down SIN.
So God sent down His only SON, at last.
Cried Adam, "Let the HOLIDAY begin!"

And He shall reign forever!

It ended with the very best of things,
When God declared HIS SON "the KING of Kings!"

Alleluia!


 

Author Notes I wanted to post this poem at Christmas time, but due to technical difficulties, I had to wait until now. I had the words all laid out on paper and the stanzas were written, but when I went to lay it out on a Scrabble board, there weren't enough letters. So I had to order more online. Just got them in the mail today. Yes I know there is an M that is actually a W, and that you cannot actually play a word in the margins, but give me a little license here. It's a poem. Now, here it is. I hope you like it.

Pay some attention to the byplay between God and Adam that I wrote into this. Adam has a mostly worldly view of Christmas, while God is trying to reveal the true meaning. Adam almost gets it, but not quite.

This is a Scrabble Poem.
I was introduced to it by a former Fanstorian, Indie Skreet. She may have been its creator. I'm not sure. The concept is to create a themed Scrabble layout and then write a rhymed poem describing the play.

This photograph was taken by the author himself on January 4, 2016.


Chapter 359
Wills and Spirits

By Treischel




Like seagull's acrobatic antics here,
We'll navigate life's twists and turns, when near.
Wind-battered wings will carry us along,
Although the outcome isn't always clear.

But if our wills and spirits can stay strong,
We'll overcome most things that could go wrong.
Our nature has desires to survive,
Yes -- even when the odds are often long.

When storm breaks, it's a joy to be alive,
Refreshed and fully free to swoop and dive.
For troubles are avoided, overcome,
Because, just like the birds, we juke and jive.

While facing dark horizons looking glum.
We've weathered them to be what we've become.
So, once those dreaded problems disappear,
Remember where you've been and where you're from.

Author Notes When all is said and done, we will survive.

This poem is an Interlinked Rubiyat.
It takes on all the attributes of a Rubiyat written in iambic pentameter. In this Persian form of poetry is a series of rhymed quatrains. In each quatrain, all lines rhyme except the third, leading to this pattern:
aaba.
An "Interlocking Rubiyat" is a Rubiyat where the subsequent stanza rhymes its 1st, 2nd, and 4th lines with the sound at the end of the 3rd line in the stanza before it. In this form, the 3rd line of the final stanza is also rhymed with the 3 rhymed lines in the first stanza.
This leads to a form like this example with four stanzas; note that the Rubiyat is allowed an unlimited number of stanzas, so extend the pattern as needed. The rhyme scheme is:
aaba bbcb ccdc ddad

This photograph was taken and modified by the author himself on October 16, 2015.


Chapter 360
Seeking Home

By Treischel



A golden light has settled on the day,
While people in their cars are heading home.
No matter where their efforts make them roam,
They seek it, whether near or far away.
And so, they'll brave the traffic's frantic fray
That tests them to outrun the setting sun.
And often tattered tempers have begun,
Beyond what soothing music can allay.

But finally, their residence is reached,
Where they receive the comfort of their mate.
Although their nerves and senses have been breached,
There's someone there to whom they can relate,
And bring about the prayers that were beseeched,
As sun was setting, day was getting late.


Author Notes I tried to capture the essence of driving home after a long day at work. For some, there is road rage. Others stay calm listening to music. All desire the comforts of home and their mate.

This poem is a Byron's Sonnet.
Lord Bryon wrote several Sonnets. Byron's Sonnets are obviously influenced by the Italian form rather than the English and possess an Octave with a Sestet. The eight lines of the Octave comprises of a progression of three rhymes a. b. b. a... a. c. c. a., but it's the six lines of the Sestet that makes it unique, with its pattern of d. e. d...e. d. e. This was his favorite and signature rhyme scheme. The total interweaving rhyme scheme is:
abba acca ded ede.
It is written in iambic pentameter. Volta at line 9.

This picture was taken by the author himself in January 26, 2012.


Chapter 361
The Power of Song

By Treischel

The Power of Song
(A Double Acrostic Cleaved Petrarchan Sonnet/Rondeau)
(Also an If/Then Poem)

Read the red poem first, then the blue, and then finally, the whole thing from left to right

If                                                                         Then
Petrarchan Sonnet                                         Rondeau

If men were witty Troubadours                    Then women would listen 'til dawn
From music they'd soothe any soul             Held as if magically drawn
   Mastered, they could really control         Each note as it hung in the air
   Ethereal charms at its core                         New, delivered with nimble flair
   Nothing like it, ever before                            With words reflected seldom on
Would seem to caress and cajole                    Over themes that Angels could spawn
Even though there's a simple goal                   Moving gracefully as a swan
Released as the syllables soar                          Every movement beyond compare
Eliciting wanton desires                                     Now women would

Will women respond to a man                     With only the words put upon
In ways that ignite carnal fires                      Over flames considered long gone
To swoon as the music inspires                    Undone by the light and the glare
That captures their attention span              Like a pigeon trapped in his snare
Yielding to whom she now admires            Drawn forth by the lure of his song
                                                                                         Then women would.

 

Author Notes Just saying that women respond to music. Troubadours had the life!

Written as inspired by Pantygynt's Poem, The Sirelei Songs.

This poem is a Double Acrostic Cleaved Petrarchan Sonnet/Rondeau in an If/Then Format.
There are actually five different poetic formats amalgamated in this poem: an Acrostic, a Cleave, A Petrachan Sonnet, a Rondeau, and an If/Then Poem.
An Acrostic poem is one where the first letter of every line spells out a word or phrase vertically down the front of the poem. This is a Double Acrostic, because there are two separate poems, each with their own phrase. The two poems are color-coded so that the reader can see them more easily. The Acrostic phrases have been bolded with enlarged letters, for the same reason.
The red side is a Petrarchan or Italian Sonnet with the rhyme scheme of:
abbaabba, cdccdc
in mixed tetameter. The red Acrostic reads: IF MEN WERE WITTY. The blue Acrostic reads: THEN WOMEN WOULD. The right hand blue poem is a Rondeau in mixed tetrameter, save for the repeated line which is in dimeter. The rhyme scheme here is:
aabba, aabR, aabbaR.
A Cleaved poem is a poem that is read in two halves, each being a poem in itself, then read as one complete poem.
An If/Then poem is one that poses an If-Then hypothesis of cause and effect.

Punctuation is limited as it would differ depending on which poem is being read. I took some license with the meter. Read intelligently, it will all make sense eventually.

This photograph was taken by the author himself on January 21, 2016, of a guitar candle we have, being Elvis fans.


Chapter 362
English Rebellion (ER)

By Treischel

First read authors notes.
Read the yellow left hand poem first. Then read the blue, right hand poem.
Finally read the whole thing across as one from left to right


Boadicea, the Celt                                   Daughter of a British king
Organized the tribes                               Exuded true might
Against the Romans                                Fractured heavy hold
Damage really dealt                                Entering the fight
In British Island                                        As warrior woman
Celtic uprising                                           Totally commits
Enlistments of the local warriors.        Entry of their mad Icenti Queen
Are not surprising                                    Damsel causes fits

Legions invaded England                      Delayed reactions are calm
Extracting tribute                                     Enraged ire of some
And enslaving tribes.                              Finally react
Doing disrepute                                       Excites them to come
Everywhere they go                                Anyone can see
Raising discontent                                  The tribes revolt
Or,enlistments of local warriors.        Entry of their mad Icenti Queen
From real resentment                            Drives the final bolt

Tribes were so upset                              Turn to female force
Heat burning behind the eyes            Have local goddess vixen
Elect their leader                                     Elected by votes

Incited against their foe                         Renowned for her great courage
Common enemies                                   On the battle field
Excite the blood-lust                                Makes barriers fall
Native energies                                        A Banshee revealed
To boiling caldrons                                  Naked force unleashed
In rising measures                                   Sending fire down

Enlistments of the local warriors.        Entry of their mad Icenti Queen
Recovers all their treasures                   Runs them out of town

Author Notes This is a tale of an English rebellion (for poetic purposes I call it the ER) against the Romans in 60AD. The British Isles were considered a Roman colony. Their rule was heavy and brutal after their invasion and occupation in 43AD. The revolt was lead by a warrior woman named Boadicea, also known as: Boudica, Boudicca, Boadacaea. Loosely translated, her name reads either Victory, or Victoria. There is a statue of her in London. Boadicea was the wife of Prasutagus, who was head of the Iceni, or Icenti tribe in East England, in what is now Norfolk and Suffolk. After his death, she was publically humiliated and her daughters raped by the Romans. Led by Boadicea, about 100,000 British attacked Camulodunum (now Colchester), the main Roman garrison, and burned it to the ground, while forcing the Roman Governor to flee. Boadicea exhorted her troops from her chariot, her daughters beside her. Legend has it that she employed a form of divination, releasing a hare from the folds of her dress and interpreting the direction in which it ran, and invoked Andraste, a British goddess of victory, to rain fire down upon the enemy. Immediately Boadicea's army turned to the largest city in the British Isles, Londinium (London). Suetonius strategically abandoned the city, and Boadicea's army burned Londinium and massacred the 25,000 inhabitants who had not fled. Next, Boadicea and her army marched on Verulamium (St. Albans), a city largely populated by Britons who had cooperated with the Romans and who were killed as that city was destroyed. She was eventually defeated by the Romans. It was in the Victorian era that Boadicea's fame took on legendary proportions as Queen Victoria came to be seen as Boadicea's "namesake", their names being identical in meaning. So here we have a Roman colony in rebellion by the English against their overbearing masters. Being an American, I find this ironic. There is much more about her. Google her , if you are interested.

This poem is a Cleaved Acrostic Double LyriCat with 5-7-5 inset.
A Cleaved poem is one that can be read in three parts - the two halves can be read alone, or as one continuous poem. An Acrostic poem has the first letter of each line read as a word or phrase read vertically. In this case there are two. Each coloured poem above is a standard 3 stanza LyriCat, a form created by Fanstorian, I am Cat, with a syllable count over each 8 line stanza of 75555595 and a rhyme scheme of abcbdeFe. The seventh (F) line is repeated in each stanza. But I did insert a 5-7-5 Senryu between stanza two and three. The yellow poem's acrostic reads Boadicea Leader of The Icenti ER. The form for the blue poem reads Defeated Defeated the Romans ER (I stated it twice as she defeated them more than once). When the whole thing is finally read straight across I would describe the form as a Heroic LyriCat and Senryu with a syllable count of 14,10,10,10,10,10,18,10. Punctuation has been omitted.

Picture is from Yahoo images.


Chapter 363
The Statue

By Treischel



Near the shores of Minnesota
Stands a statue of the couple.

Holding on to Minnehaha
Lovely maiden Minnehaha
Stands the warrior Hiawatha
Hiawatha Great Lakes warrior
Of Ojibwa tribal custom

Wants a young Dakota woman
Much against the given wisdom
Of the Chieftain and the Shaman

These two smitten native lovers
Long ago their legend left as
Two defiant lovers racing
Through the forest, braving snow storm
They create a brave new wind song

Minnehaha, Laughing Water
Lived nearby the waterfall shore
Stole the heart of Hiawatha
Even though their love forbidden
Due to war that raged between tribes

War was waged between Ojibwa
And her tribe of the Dakota
Making theirs a cursed profane love

"Nevermore" her father's blessing
"Nevermore" his father's blessing

Sharing love between two lovers
Followed him, her handsome warrior
Hiawatha risking anger
Took her, braving tribal action
Through the woods along the way
Carried her across the rivers
Carried her past raging waters
Brought her home to peace at long last

Author Notes This is a statue Hiawatha and Minnehaha, located at Minnehaha Falls in Minneapolis, Minnesota. It commemorates the "Song of Hiawatha" written by a local author and poet, William Wadsworth Longfellow, whose house is also preserved on the grounds. The statue was placed there in 1911. He wrote an epic poem about Hiawatha in 1855 that starts with those famous lines, "On the shores of Gitchee-Gumee, by the shining Big-Sea-Water". It was a long poem, written in Trochaic Tetrameter. There were 22 chapters to the book. Hiawatha was a heroic, larger-than-life legend among the Native Americans, much like Paul Bunyan. Longfellow captured some of them in his poem. The marriage to Minnehaha, bringing peace between the tribes in just one of them. I tried to capture that here in my own words, but mimicking the style used of Longfellow.

The poem is written in trochee, which is the opposite accent of iambic meter. Instead of a da DUM da DUM cadence, where the line ends with a strong accent. It has a tempo DA dum Da dum, where the line ends in a soft accent. It is contained in four poetic feet (8 syllables), or tetrameter. Therefore, trochaic tetrameter. Longfellow didn't use a rhyme scheme in his poem. It is characterized by Finnish language traits and story telling, that lend themselves well to Native American speech patterns too.

This photograph was taken by the author himself on January 23, 2016.


Chapter 364
A Last Goodbye

By Treischel



Was this love ever meant to be?
It sparked in instant chemistry.
Drawn forth through some magnetic charm,
We melted in each other's arms.

Then sunshine played upon our days,
While night was ruled by moonlight's rays.
We reveled in joined company.
Contented just to let it be.

But now the morning hours,
Once perfumed by flowers,
Reveal vast differences,
Several instances,
Our natures never meet,
And consciences compete.

And so, my love, I must conclude,
Our love was just an interlude.

I hear the songbird calling me
It sings of things not meant to be.

Now, as the sun's rays touch the morning sky,
With one last gentle kiss,
A final look recalling this,
With heavy heart, I leave a last goodbye.



Author Notes Oh, the pain!

This poem is an Aubade.
An Aubade is a poem about parting in the morning. There is no specified format other than to convey the essence of the moment. The purpose of an Aubade is to convey the emotion of separation. It is a morning love song (as opposed to a serenade, which is in the evening), or a song or poem about lovers separating at dawn. It has also been defined as "a song or instrumental composition concerning, accompanying, or evoking daybreak".

In the strictest sense of the term, an aubade is a song from a door or window to a sleeping woman. Aubades are generally conflated with what are strictly called albas, which are exemplified by a dialogue between parting lovers, a refrain with the word alba, and a watchman warning the lovers of the approaching dawn.

Aubades were in the repertory of troubadours in Europe in the Middle Ages. The love poetry of the 16th century dealt mostly with unsatisfied love, so the aubade was not a major genre in Elizabethan lyric.

Aubades were written from time to time into the 18th and 19th century. In the 20th century, the focus of the aubade shifted from the genre's original specialized courtly love context into the more abstract theme of a human parting at daybreak. Source: Wikipedia.

This photograph was taken by the author himself on April 15, 2015.


Chapter 365
Undulating Snow

By Treischel


I love the play of light on undulating snow,
Its rounded surface sculpted by the wind.
The shades of black and white unite,
Like satin sheets gale-whipped, unpinned,
Released adrift along the way that shadows flow.

On cloudy days, the snow competes with naked trees,
Whose sleek and slender fingers claw the sky.
The shades of black and white unite,
In ways cloud muted contrasts amplify.
Each waivers up and down in subtle cold degrees.

On sunny days, those jeweled crystals soon ignite,
In blinding bursts of stunning white snow glare.
The shades of black and white unite,
With morning frost, to mingle in crisp air,
As light on undulating snow, glows everywhere.



Author Notes I think the poem says it all. Wind whipped snow on open fields undulates in lovely patterns of dark shadows and white rounded mounds. It's enough to make one wax poetic! In this poem, I wanted to contrast the difference in mood that a cloudy day has, compared to a sunny day. Of course, this photograph was taken on a cloudy day. But I believe that both have their merits.

This poem is a Symmetrina.
The Symmetrina was created by Fanstorian Pantygynt. I discovered it while reviewing his poem, Polhena Beach, Sri Lanka, 0600.

I chose this format because it undulates too.

It is called it a Symmetrina because it presents a symmetrical shape and rhyme scheme over each stanza: The rhyme scheme for each is:
abcba.
The rhythm is iambic throughout. It is structured in Quintets, which are stanzas with 5 lines. The first and last lines are Alexandrine Hexameters (12 syllables), the second and fourth pentameters (10 syllables) and the third is a tetrameter (8 syllables). So the meter becomes: 12,10,8,10,12.
No limit to the number of stanzas.

For this poem I modified the rhyme scheme a bit. I used the middle unrhymed line c in the middle of the stanza as an interlinked, repeating line in every stanza. I also used the c rhyme as the first and last rhyme in the final stanza to give a somewhat unique overall rhyme scheme that looks like this:
abCba - deCed - cfCfc.

This photograph was taken by the author on January 26, 2012.


Chapter 366
Cold Backwaters of Obscurity

By Treischel



In obscurity
I reside
and hide

Toiling
             through the cold
backwaters
              of obscurity   
                              As dark depression
                                        saps my sullen soul

Only a few fine friends
know me

Still
largely unrecognized
                           though there's many fans-
unraveled threads
                           The goods not sent as advertised

There's more out there
Somewhere
              lurking in the deeper waters
              where the lure on money waits
                          gilded baits

                          Too rich a fare
                          for me to dare

A fatal quirk
perhaps
knee jerk

How do I react?
               Published works unsold
               Darkness taking hold

Is it reaction to my work?
            or lack of it?
That spins me down a hole

No reaction at all

                              I
                              hit
                              a
                             wall

It takes its toll
I can't control
as my ranking
                                drops
                                drops
                                drops

Obscurity
in the cold backwaters
I reside

The fogs begin to roll in
wanting to swallow me whole
as I sink
                                deeper
                               deeper
                              deeper

Towards the pit
Where I now sit
        For it
Wants me to die

I cry

                               BEGONE!

To no avail
I can't shake it off my tail
             I fail

             NO!

    My spirit rales
rallies and prevails

I will fight the thought
depression brought

I won't get caught
      In the lie

At least I'll try

Obscurity
In the cold backwaters
I reside

                        But here I'll sit
I'll do what I do

I'll write until I'm no longer blue

             Because
             I know
Someday the sun again
Will show

                 I know

                                    I know


 

Author Notes Maybe I need a break

Author's Photograph


Chapter 367
Life's Journey

By Treischel



Life
goes by
really fast.
Just like a sigh,
or a lightning flash,
today becomes the past.
Still, no matter how we try,
We will leave ripples in our wake,
to touch on the shores of joy or strife.
It's just part of life's journey we partake.

Author Notes So Journey well my friends!

Author's photograph.


Chapter 368
Police on Horses

By Treischel



Policemen, on the public's side
For crowd protection, horses ride,
While children love to stand beside.
A source of pride! A source of pride!

There'll be no terrorist abuse,
As parks are safe for public use,
Once detriment, the fiends deduce.
There's no excuse! There's no excuse!

So kids are free to run and play,
And see the sights there on display,
As mounted horsemen guard the way.
A lovely day. A lovely day.

So dance and prance and play outside,
As feats of mayhem are denied.
Police on horses have been spied.
A source of pride! A source of pride!


Author Notes St. Paul, Minnesota is having its Winter Carnival this week, so I was out and about in the area, and spotted these policemen on horses, watching over the festivities. Since, policemen, in general, have been getting some bad publicity lately, I thought I'd post something a little more positive. The kids were loving the animals. The police were talking to them, answering their questions, and letting them pet the horses.

This poem is a Monotetra.
The Monotetra is a poetic form developed by Michael Walker. Here are the basic rules:
It is comprised of quatrains (four-line stanzas) in tetrameter (four metrical feet) for a total of 8 syllables per line.
Each quatrain consists of mono-rhymed lines (so each line in the first stanza has the same type of rhyme, and each line in the second stanza used the same rhyme that its stanza establishes, etc.) The final line of each stanza carries the rhyme of the three previous lines, but repeats the first four syllables of that line to create an echo. So, you have mono-rhymed lines in tetrameter (thus the name - Monotetra).
This poem can be as short as one quatrain or as long as a poet wishes.

This poem has four stanzas, so total rhyme scheme becomes: a,a,a,(A,A) - b,b,b,(B,B) - c,c,c,(C,C) - a,a,a,(A,A),
where the parenthesis indicate rhyme within the same line, and the capital letters indicate a repeat. I also repeated the rhyme scheme and last line of the first stanza in the last Stanza. But this is not a requirement.

This photograph was taken by the author himself on Snday, January 312, 2016.


Chapter 369
Silent Winter Scene

By Treischel

 
 
 
 
I scanned this silent winter’s scene,
Its colors muted snow.
A frozen channel lies between
Where once the waters flow.
 
                                                              It makes me yearn the color blue
                                                              On ripples that once floated through.
                                                              The scene was lacking that true hue,
 
This stunning stark tableau.
 
 
So lonely sits pagoda’s seat
Where lovers love to go
To meet within this sweet retreat
As winds of passion blow.
                                                               
                                                                It makes me want to sit right there
                                                                To let my senses be aware
                                                                Of season’s changes everywhere.
 
This stunning stark tableau.
 
 
I miss the green of grass and leaves,
Their presence doesn’t show.
Instead the pines bring such reprieves,
Slate skies with snow below.
 
                                                                    It made me sense with some regret
                                                                    A summers warmth, although still yet
                                                                   There is a charm that snows beget.
 
This stunning stark tableau.
 

 

Author Notes Although winter scenes lack all the colors of the other seasons, there is a different kind of beauty in winter, as this tableau reminded me. It's partly the silent serenity, but also the clean, stark contrasts that draw me.

This poem is a Pantygynt.
This is a new form created by none other than our very own Pantygynt. The meter is iambic, either tetrameter or trimeter, and each stanza consists of three parts: a Quatrain of alternate rhyme (abab) with 8-6-8-6 meter, a Tercet rhyming ccc, with all tetrametric lines, and a single concluding trimetric line rhyming b.

I did make a slight modification and used single line as a refrain throughout the three Pantygynt segments.

This photograph was taken by the author himself on January 31, 2016.


Chapter 370
Crescent Moon

By Treischel





The night
           was dark
                         but you
                                were there,
                                                 so fair,
                                                       to clothe
                                                           night sky
                                                               with gold
                                                                   thin glare.
                                                                    Oh Moon,
                                                                    your beams
                                                                       that shine
                                                                       so bright
                                                                      in night's
                                                                    black air,
                                                               will show
                                                           so sweet
                                                     to share
                                             the love
                                  you spare
                        to those
            who view
you there.



 

Author Notes The moon is always spellbinding, but the crescent moon is very special.

This poem is a Monometer Poem
A Monometer poem is written in one iambic foot (two syllables per line). The strong accent must always be on the second syllable, in order to keep it iambic. It can be as long as the poet likes, but at least 10 lines. This is a very good poetic form to teach iambic meter.

Picture from Yahoo Images.


Chapter 371
Love and Flowers

By Treischel


What speaks more love than flower's bloom?
They fill the air with sweet perfume,
and give the eye a vivid view
that sets the scene with bright display.
Such beauty spreads in every way.

There's some presenting ruffled edge,
to grace an ornamental hedge,
with inner charm of subtle hue.
While other buds will burst with flair,
to fan out, sleek and debonair.

In either case, when picked with pride,
or purchased from a floral shop,
love's true intentions never stop,
when given to your lovely bride.



Author Notes Happy Valentine's Day to all you brides and love mates.

This poem is a Roserian Sonnet.
The Roserian Sonnet was created by Jose Rizal M. Reyes of the Philippines. It consists of two Quintets or Quintrains (5 line stanza) plus a closing Quatrain. The two Quintrains are interlinked with a shared rhyme in the third line (middle) of each. So there are two rhyming couplets in the first stanza with another rhyme sandwiched between them that matches the one in the center of the second stanza. It's almost like a peek-a-boo rhyme. The closing Quatrain uses an enveloping rhyme. It's usually written in iambic. Volta somewhere after line 8.
So it's a Quintet + Quintet + Quatrain, using a rhyme scheme of:

aabcc ddbee fggf

This photograph was taken by the author himself on July 11, 2015.


Chapter 372
Outside Our Bedroom Window

By Treischel



We are so warm and cozy in our bed.
We love to snuggle 'neath the comforter,
where I can share my body warmth with her,
as sweet endearments wander through my head.
Outside I see the snowflakes swiftly spread.
The window shows a white and nasty blur.
Where only silent snowdrifts dare to stir,
I see a lovely languid day ahead.

Although the air outside contains a chill,
and our thermometers are far below
that zero mark, where winters often go.
It's warm beneath our cozy goose-down fill,
and temp'ratures are rising to a glow,
regardless what's beyond our window sill.



Author Notes That is my house in a recent snow storm. That is my bedroom window.

This poem is a Petrarchan Sonnet
The most famous early Sonneteer was Petrarca (known in English as Petrarch). He popularized the Italian Sonnet, which now carries his name. The basic meter of all Sonnets in English is iambic pentameter, although there have been a few tetrameter and even hexameter Sonnets, as well.

The Italian sonnet is divided into two sections by two different groups of rhyming sounds. The first 8 lines is called the Octave and rhymes as follows:
a b b a a b b a
The remaining 6 lines is called the Sestet and can have either two or three rhyming sounds, arranged in a variety of ways:
c d c d c d
c d d c d c
c d e c d e
c d e c e d
c d c e d c
The exact pattern of Sestet rhymes (unlike the octave pattern) is flexible. In strict practice, the one thing that is to be avoided in the Sestet is ending with a couplet (dd or ee), as this was never permitted in Italy, and Petrarch himself (supposedly) never used a couplet ending; in actual practice, Sestets are sometimes ended with couplets.
The poem is thus divided into two sections by the two differing rhyme groups. In accordance with the principle, a change from one rhyme group to another signifies a change in subject matter. This change occurs at the beginning of line 9 (L9) in the Italian sonnet and is called the Volta,or "turn"; the turn is an essential element of the Sonnet form, perhaps the essential element.

This photograph was taken by the author himself on February 2, 2016.


Chapter 373
The Trial of Jesus (Part 1)

By Treischel



Before the council He was brought.
"What has he done against our ways?"
          "Said he'd destroy, and then rebuild, Temple in three days."
"Well, is that true?" asked Caiaphas.
But Jesus' silence answered him.
          "Are you Messiah, Son of God?"
The High Priest asked, leaning forward with a sneering nod.
"I AM," replied hand-bound Jesus.

The leader then beseeched the crowd, with garments torn,
"You heard it. Blasphemy!" he screamed in angry scorn.
          "We all have heard it, with his own besotted breath."
"What is your verdict?"
                       They responded, "Death -- Death -- Death!"
And then, they spat in it, and slapped His blinded face.
          All taunting, "Prophesy, who caused you each disgrace?"
If false Messiah, Jesus broke the Jewish law,
His miracles dismissed, as if they never saw.
While, as a threat, the leaders wanted Jesus gone.
That's why the accusations all continued on.

They brought Him to the Roman Governor.
Before him, wrapped in chains, as prisoner.


 

Author Notes Jesus had two trials. I am presenting the first one here, which is the trial before the Jewish Sanhedrin, a counsel of the judicial leaders. Caiaphas, as the high priest, was the leader. This is the group that issued the death sentence, but they needed the Romans. So, He needed a second trial by the Romans to confirm and carry out His execution.

In the poem, I would forego the Christian convention of capitalizing pronoun references to Jesus, when spoken by a non-believer.

This poem is a Queriet.
The Queriet is a newly created format by our very own Pantytgynt. It is a very complex form, that is useful with question/answer dialogue, and is my first attempt at his instructions from his poem, Beltane Sacrifice.
"Feeling the need for another poem in which the Q & A form would be appropriate, I thought I would try to write to a similar form which I now christen the "Queriet" from the queries or questions that are an essential feature of what has here become the first eight line stanza. You can have as many questions and answers as you wish but this first stanza of each cycle must contain at least one. This stanza is syllabic to the syllable count of 8,8,13,8,8,8,13,8 and the rhyme scheme for this stanza is abbcdbbc.
If appropriate both question and response may come from one and the same person, as in a soliloquy. I have not found this necessary here.

The second part of the cycle contributes more detail and covers 10 lines of metered rhyming couplets. Any meter consistent over the 10 lines can be used. Here I have gone for iambic heptameter.

The whole poem concludes in the manner of a sonnet with a rhyming couplet of iambic pentameter."

However, for my poem in the second section, I chose the Alexandrine meter, or Hexameter (12 syllables). I will also note that I am not crazy with the rhyme scheme in the first section as it leaves the a and d rhymes hanging. But that is his required design.

The picture is from Yahoo images.


Chapter 374
The Trial of Jesus-modified (Part 2)

By Treischel



On Friday morning, they brought Him
To Pilot's palace, stayed outside,
As during Passover, it would "defile" Jewish pride.
So, he came out, "What's this about?"
          "He claims to be Messiah -- King."
"That's not a crime," Pilot replied.
          "He's causing riots, here to Galilee," they implied.
"Then he's Herod's problem, no doubt."

Now Herod happened to be in Jerusalem,
And anxious to see Jesus, to examine Him.
Concerning that, "I'd like to see a miracle."
But Jesus really was inimical,
Remaining silent here, before this Jewish king,
Whose reign portrayed the very worst of everything.
Then Herod mocked Him, and abused His countenance,
Regaled with purple robe and such appurtenance.
The beatings and cajoling caused no great effect,
And Jesus' non-response gave Herod no respect.

King Herod, found he nothing to attack,
To Jews chagrin, he sent our Jesus back.


“So you're King of Jews?” Pilot asked.
          “I am,” said Christ. “As thou said it.”
“You are a king then?” Wanting to see what He’d admit.
          “My kingdom is not of this world.”
“He’s innocent! I’ll have him whipped.”
 Then sent Him to the penal pit
To scourge with leaded thongs, that caused skin to tear and split,
While scorn and much abuse was hurled.
 
With long thin thorns a crown was placed upon his head,
Then pounded in with canes, ensuring that it bled.
They stripped His clothes, then dressed him in some purple robe,
Sat Him on stool, and gave a stick as scepter probe.
“Hail, King of Jews!” they mocked, then brought Him back to view,
Where Pilot looked Him over, asking “Who are you?”
          The answer came, “I’m here to bring the world the truth.”
“Truth? What is truth?” He replied, Rome's judicial sleuth.
 
As scene for pity’s sake, was Pilot’s plan.
He showed Christ to the crowd, “Behold the Man!”





 

Author Notes Modification Note:
I have totally rewritten The second cycle of Part 2, because I felt it too condensed. I wanted to include more about the scourging, the Ceasar comment, and include Pilot's famous statement "Truth? What is truth?" So, I totally rewrote the first eight lines, that previously read:

"Are you a King" he asked Our Lord.
"My kingdom is not of this world."
"We'll see, when whips have laid the skin of your back unfurled."
A crown of thorns placed on His head,
Before the crowd, "Behold the man!"
"On this feast, one man can be released"
"Barabus or him?"
"Barabus!"
Then they were appeased.
"What of him?"
"Crucify him, dead!"

Previous Author's notes;
It's interesting to note that, of the four Evangelists writing about this event, only Luke mentions the trip from Pilot to Herod, and back. This poem tries to cover both events within two Queriet cycles. Although greatly paraphrased, I believe I covered most of it, considering all four of the descriptions.

In the poem, I would forego the Christian convention of capitalizing pronoun references to Jesus, when spoken by a non-believer.

Inimical - not friendly
Appurtenance - an object, or piece of equipment, used for a particular situation.
Blasphemy - profane abuse of God, claiming to be God.
Cajole - to try to influence, coax, wheedle.
Countenance - a person's face or likeness, their physical being.

This poem is a Queriet.
The Queriet is a newly created format by our very own Pantytgynt. It is a very complex form, that is useful with question/answer dialogue, and is my first attempt at his instructions from his poem, Beltane Sacrifice.
"Feeling the need for another poem in which the Q & A form would be appropriate, I thought I would try to write to a similar form which I now christen the "Queriet" from the queries or questions that are an essential feature of what has here become the first eight line stanza. You can have as many questions and answers as you wish but this first stanza of each cycle must contain at least one. This stanza is syllabic to the syllable count of 8,8,13,8,8,8,13,8 and the rhyme scheme for this stanza is abbcdbbc.
If appropriate both question and response may come from one and the same person, as in a soliloquy. I have not found this necessary here.

The second part of the cycle contributes more detail and covers 10 lines of metered rhyming couplets. Any meter consistent over the 10 lines can be used. Here I have gone for iambic heptameter.

The whole poem concludes in the manner of a sonnet with a rhyming couplet of iambic pentameter."

However, for my poem in the second section, I chose the Alexandrine meter, or Hexameter (12 syllables).

The picture is from Yahoo images.




Chapter 375
The Trial of Jesus (Part 3)

By Treischel



          The mob replied, "We want his death!"
 "He is your King!" in frustration.
          "We have no King but Caesar, pontiff of our nation!"
"I've found him innocent, again!"
          The crowd roared, "You must crucify!"
"I release one, this occasion."
"Barrabus or him?"
                               "Barrabus!" came loud oration.
"What of him?"
                         "Crucify him, then."

Then Pilot asked them, "Why? I find him innocent."
Incited crowd was loud, with angry argument.
The trouble-makers, in the yard, kept feelings raw,
          "His blasphemy requires death, in Jewish law!"
This Roman lord could see that he had lost control,
And riots could ensue, if he did not console.
Centurions were sent to fetch a water bin,
That Pontius Pilot took and placed his hands within.
"I wash my hands of this man's blood, as it's on you."
          "His blood shall be on us, and on our children too."

That curse accepted, God's plan put in play.
The Romans quickly led Our Lord away.


 

Author Notes In American English vernacular, again rhymes with then.

Modification Note:
I have totally rewritten the second cycle of Part 2, because I felt it too condensed. I wanted to include more about the scourging, the Caesar comment, and include Pilot's famous statement "Truth? What is truth?" So, I totally rewrote the first eight lines of that part of the cycle, that previously read:

"Are you a King" he asked Our Lord.
"My kingdom is not of this world."
"We'll see, when whips have laid the skin of your back unfurled."
A crown of thorns placed on His head,
Before the crowd, "Behold the man!"
"On this feast, one man can be released."
"Barabus or him?"
"Barabus!"
Then they were appeased.
"?What of him?"
"Crucify him, dead!"

Then I moved the entire ending to this Part 3.

Author's notes:
I find the differences in the four versions of the bible interesting.
Matthew is the one who quotes the curse the Jews accept upon themselves. Only Luke mentions the Herod episode. Mathew, Mark and Luke, all have the soldiers scourging and abusing Jesus after Pilot washes his hands and condemns Jesus, but John has it in the sequence that I portray here. Since he is the only actual eye witness, I thought his the most accurate, although he didn't mention Herod. Only Luke mentions a letter about a dream by Pilot's wife, which I left out. I couldn't fit in an interchange between Pilot and Jesus where Pilot says, "Don't you know that I have the power to release you, or crucify you?" Jesus replies, "You would have no power but for that given you from above". Luke is the one who makes the point about Jesus and taxes and Caesar. John has the most intimate details. It occurs to me that John was out in the courtyard with all the Jews, as an eye witness. So he may not have been privy to the Herod episode. Luke was a scholar, and wrote much later. He had the benefit of reviewing the Roman accounts. He says Herod was in Jerusalem, but not where. Herod was likely a guest in Pilot's palace, due to his rank and stature. So that whole event might have occurred within the Palace where none of the Jews would have been even aware it took place.

This poem is a Queriet. I'll refer you back to part 1 or 2 for an explanation, rather than repeat it here.

The picture is from Yahoo images.


Chapter 376
The Harrowing of Hell

By Treischel




Before, "It's Finished!" uttered He,
In Hell then, Satan's clan rejoiced.
          The Beast proclaimed, "Prepare to torment now, Jesus Christ."
"Is he then coming here?" They asked.
          "As subject toy, to thee and me."
Just then from thunder clap was voiced, 
"Remove thy gates, thou hast no choice!"

John Baptist carried out his task.

Then suddenly a flash of light, within the pit, shined bright.
As there stood Jesus in his glory, and in all his might.
"Is it you?" cried first man Adam, "You've come to rescue me?"
          "From tree of sin, I took your blame on tree at Calvary,"
Then Satan screamed, "Why are you here? And not at my command?"
          "Foul fool, your evil plan has failed, and now you shall be damned."
They wrestled then, foundations shook, and Satan lost in time.
The shackles of the righteous broke, the Beast caged for his crime.
          "Oh death! Where is thy sting? Oh Hell! Where is thy victory!"
          Christ signed the cross, took Adam's hand, and then said, "Follow Me."

To "Alleluia!" Saints departed Hell,
Defeating death as ancient scriptures tell.


 

Author Notes The Apostles Creed
"....was crucified, died, and was buried.
He descended into Hell.
On the third day he rose again from the dead..."

As in life, John the Baptist prepared the way for Christ in death also, per the Gospel of Nicodemus.

Isaiah 24: 21-22
"And they shall be gathered in the pit together, as
prisoners are gathered, and shall be shut up in the prison, and after many days shall be visited."

David, Psalm 16: 10
" For you will not leave me among the dead; you will not allow your beloved to rot in the grave."

Zacharias, Luke 1:72-73
"He has been merciful to our ancestors, yes to Abraham himself, by remembering his sacred promise to him, by granting us the privilege of serving God fearlessly, freed from our enemies, and by making us holy and acceptable, ready to stand in His presence forever."

Abraham's Bosom, the Righteous part of Hell, Luke 16: 22-26
"Finally the beggar died, and was carried by angels to be with Abraham, in the place of the righteous dead. The rich man also died and was buried, and his soul went to Hell. There, in torment, he saw Lazarus in the far distance with Abraham.....'So now he is here being comforted, while you are in anguish. And besides, there is a great chasm separating us, and anyone wanting to come to you from here is stopped at its edge, and none there can cross to us'."

God, Zecharias 9;11
"I have delivered you from death in a waterless pit because of the covenant I made with you, sealed with blood."

Ephesians 4:9
"This means that His first came down from the heights of heaven, far down to the lowest parts of the earth."

1 Peter 3: 18-20
"But though His body died, His Spirit lived on, and it was in the Spirit that he visited the spirits in prison, and preached to them - the spirits of those who, long before Noah, had refused to listen to God, though He waited patiently for them while Noah was building the ark."

Acts 2: 24
"God has raised up Christ, having loosed the sorrows of Hell, as it is impossible that He be holden by it."

Psalm 24: 7
"Open up! Oh ancient gates, and let the King of Glory in. Who is the King of Glory? The Lord, strong and mighty, invincible."

There is also an Apocryphal book, The Gospel of Nicodemus, that gives a detailed account of Christ's descent into Hell. But this very detailed book was left out of the bible, because its age could not be authenticated. It gives an eyewitness account by two named people, of the many, who were raised from the dead when Christ was crucified, as Luke noted in his Gospel.

This poem is Queriet.
This is a "Queriet", so called from the queries or questions that are an essential feature of the first eight line stanza of each cycle. It was created by our very own Pantygynt. You can have as many questions and answers as you wish but the first stanza of each cycle must contain at least one question. The first stanza is also syllabic to the syllable count of 8,8,13,8,8,8,13,8.
I, grappling with this form for my Trials of Jesus - Part 1, remarked that I did not feel comfortable with the original rhyme scheme for this stanza that was originally abbcdbbc. The cd in the middle seemed to hang unsupported. So Pantygynt agreed to modify the scheme to run: abbcabbc.

If appropriate, both question and response may come from one and the same person, as in a soliloquy. I have not found this necessary here.

The second part of the cycle contributes more detail and covers 10 lines of metered rhyming couplets. Any meter consistent over the 10 lines can be used. Here I have gone for iambic heptameter (14 syllables).

The whole poem concludes in the manner of a sonnet with a rhyming couplet of iambic pentameter.

This picture is from Yahoo images.

Pays one point and 2 member cents.


Chapter 377
Jesus Has Risen

By Treischel


They posted guards, "Lets seal the stone."
As midnight dawned, the earth then shook.
Archangel came, away then with entrance seal he took.
The stone he rolled in blinding light,
While guards were frightened to the bone.
"What can this be, we overlook?"
They fainted fast away, within their camp's sentry nook.
          "Behold the Lord!" the angel said that night.

"Alleluia, He cometh forth!" the archangel sang.
All through the glen his clear voice rang, then from tomb, Jesus sprang.
There He stood, his fresh wounds showing, glowing in His glory.
As promised, life and death proclaimed, "Hear this finest story!"
          He told the angel, "Stay and wait, for those who are bereft."
He turned. When folded neatly clothes of His own death, He left
To lead the souls released from Hell to places to abide,
And greet His Father, "Mission complete," the moment He died.
Then even clouds and sky rejoice, as angels voice their joy
At final victory, that even Satan can't destroy.

Now, Sunday morning was dawning,
The Marys went out to the tomb.
When suddenly, an angel of the Lord filled the gloom.
             "Don't be frightened. He has risen!"
Saw stone rolled back, entrance yawning,
They looked inside -- an empty room.
"Where has He gone?"
                                       "To Galilee, where He'll meet you soon."
They ran to tell Good News given.

Apostles, hearing Mary say, "He's risen on this day!"
Did not believe her anyway. Two ran along the way.
So, John and Peter went to see what they thought couldn't be,
An empty tomb, with folded linen, placed so carefully.
Then, they remembered that He said, He'd come back from the dead.
Still, they had seen how He had bled. So in great fear they fled.
Against the Jewish retribution, in locked room they hid,
While hiding from the Romans too, concealing what they did.
For they believed the body stolen, hidden by the guards.
Ironically, their foes thought of them, in those same regards.

Our Lord appeared to people too.
To Magdalene, He first was seen.
          "Good morning, Mary. In Galilee we must convene."
Emmaus' road He met some more
Two true believers heart-broke, who
Recognized Him, when He broke bread,
He ate with them, and then taught them what the scriptures said.
"We saw Him too."
                                But are ignored.

          Appearing in their locked-up room, "My peace I give to you."
          "For now you see the prophecies have finally come true."
He showed His wounds, all five. He showed them to prove He's alive.
          "Now touch me, I'm not a ghost." They felt how the wounds survived.
           "I'm hungry. It's food I wish." So they fed the Lord some fish.
But Thomas who wasn't there, said, "You are all so foolish!"
"Until I touch and see with my own eyes, I won't believe."
But then the Lord appeared to all of them, one fateful eve,
When Thomas did those things, he said, "My Lord, My God, I say."
            "You see, then believe. Bless who don't, but believe anyway."

That's what the Bible says, so listen well.
Good News is, "He has risen!" Now go tell!




 

Author Notes I couldn't get all the meter right, so I am open to any suggestions.

I tried here to blend all four versions of Christ's Resurrection into this one poem. There are interesting differences between Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John.
Mathew has the guards posted on Saturday morning and they were temple guards. He also has Mary Magdalene and one "other Mary" come to the tomb, at dawn. The guards were there with them. and faint when the Angel comes to move the stone. He tells them Jesus has risen and will meet them in Galilee. They run and encounter Jesus on the road home. Jesus also asks to meet Him in Galilee.

Mark has the women listed as: Mary Magdalene, Salome, and Mary, mother of James. The stone was already removed with the angel inside. The Galilee statement is made here too. He also describes Jesus meeting with Magdalene as the first to see him alive, but not the other women. Mark in the first one to mention the two on the road to Emmaus.

Now Luke has two angels greet the women at the tomb. He identifies them as: Mary Magdalene, Joanna, and Mary mother of James. No mention of the Jesus meeting on the road. He has Peter alone running to the tomb. He goes into more detail on the Emmaus encounter, and how they report back to the Apostles.

John only cites Mary Magdalene as going to the tomb, while it was still dark, before dawn. No mention of any angels or guards. John races Peter to the tomb, beats him, but won't go in. Peter comes up and goes right in. John also writes a detailed account of Jesus' meeting with Mary Magdalene, after Peter and John left for home, and she had returned to the tomb and was crying there. That's when she saw the two Angels, who asked her why she was crying. Then Jesus appeared behind her, in the tomb. A very interesting thing happened. She went to hug Him, and He yelled "Don't touch Me, for I haven't ascended to my Father. But go find my brothers and tell them that I ascend to my Father and your Father, my God and your God." John 20: 17.
So he hadn't ascended yet, even though He had risen. That is why I added that in my poem.
A final interesting point is that, even though the angels said to go to Galilee, and Jesus Himself asked them to go there, the Apostles never went, but stayed hidden in Jerusalem. No wonder Mark commented on their admonishment. Even though he didn't write specifically about Thomas' doubting the resurrection until he could examine and touch the wounds. Mark 16:14 states that: "Still later He appeared to the eleven as they were eating together. He rebuked them for their unbelief - their stubborn refusal to believe those who had seen him alive."

This poem is a Queriet.
The Queriet is a newly created format by our very own Pantytgynt. It is a very complex form, that is useful with question/answer dialogue, which I learned from his poem, Beltane Sacrifice.
"Feeling the need for another poem in which the Q & A form would be appropriate, I thought I would try to write to a similar form which I now christen the "Queriet" from the queries or questions that are an essential feature of what has here become the first eight line stanza. You can have as many questions and answers as you wish but this first stanza of each cycle must contain at least one. This stanza is syllabic to the syllable count of 8,8,13,8,8,8,13,8 and the rhyme scheme for this stanza is abbcabbc.
If appropriate both question and response may come from one and the same person, as in a soliloquy. I have not found this necessary here.

The second part of the cycle contributes more detail and covers 10 lines of metered rhyming couplets. Any meter consistent over the 10 lines can be used. Here I have gone for Heptameter (14 syllables).

The whole poem concludes in the manner of a Sonnet with a rhyming couplet of iambic pentameter."

This picture is from Yahoo images.


Chapter 378
Driftwood

By Treischel




Flotsam down the river drifts,
'Til currents shift it to shore
Where it sits upon the beach.
Roots reach nowhere anymore.

Once it was a mighty tree,
Proud and free on wooded bank.
'Til lumberjack took its wood,
Where it stood, a stunted shank.

Roots then lost the earth's firm grip.
Began a slip -- erosion.
Into river trunk stump crashed.
It splashed, trip set in motion.

Driftwood sitting patiently,
Expectantly, waiting rise,
Then flood waters come along,
Current strong, releasing ties.

Untangled roots float again,
Until when it's forced to stop.
Who can tell where roots may go?
You never know where they'll plop.


Author Notes Just some tree stump driftwood on the Mississippi River that I spotted the other day. These my stay, or might drift further down when the river rises. You never know.

Shank - a cylinder forming a long narrow part of something.
Flotsam - floating debris in water.
Lumberjack - someone who cuts down trees for a living
Erosion - the wearing away of soil or hillsides due to rain.

This poem is a Awdl Gwydd.
The Awdl Gwydd (pronounced like: owdle gow-widd) is a Welsh poetic format made up of quatrains with a specific rhyme scheme that repeat the end-rhyme of the first and third line as an inline rhyme in the second and fourth. It's important to state that Celtic poetry is based on sound structures to make them easy to remember, with rhyme not as important as repetition, alliteration and rhythm.
Each stanza is a quatrain of seven syllables. Lines two and four rhyme rhyme with each other; lines one and three cross rhyme to form the inline rhyme into either the second, third, fourth, OR fifth syllable of lines two and four. So the rhyme scheme of each stanza becomes:
a, (a,b), c, (c,b),
where the lines in parens represent the inline-endline rhyme structure. For example, below I show two stanza layouts where the Xs are just syllables and the letters show the rhyme. The first stanza has the cross rhymes in the third syllable. The second stanza has them in the fifth.


x x x x x x a
x x a x x x b
x x x x x x c
x x c x x x b

x x x x x x d
x x x x d x e
x x x x x x f
x x x x f x e

This image was taken by the author himself on March 9, 2016.


Chapter 379
Distracted by Beauty

By Treischel



The prettiest flowers I've ever seen
have caught my eyes, with multi-colored hue.
They laid upon a luscious bed of green,
with hearts of white, but crowned in royal blue.

To me, they seemed so gloriously new.
The blooms all teamed, to overflow the pot.
Such beauties! Likes of these are very few.
Their photograph was taken on the spot.

But, taken by their charms, almost forgot,
I had to carry on my purposed walk.
Although I want to stay transfixed, a lot,
my promise was to meet her at the dock.

So I must set this dalliance aside,
for I committed first to meet my bride.


Author Notes Sometimes I get so distracted, that I become an addlepated poet, but must not keep my wife waiting, when I promised to meet her at the boat landing after her trip out with friends. But the walk from parking lot to dock was so intriguing, I might tarry too long. Mostly fiction, for the story. You figure out which part is real.

The flowers are Cinerarias, a flower that is part of the Sunflower family, native to South Africa, although this variety is a hybrid - Pericallis. It is common in the Canary islands, the Azores, and Madeira. The like a cooler temperature range between 50 and 75 F, so they flourish best in early spring and late fall, but do not like hot, dry climates. These were potted, along a walking path in Minnesota.

This poem is a Spensarian Sonnet.
A variant on the English Sonnet form is the Spenserian Sonnet, named after Edmund Spenser (1552 -1599), in which he uses an interlocking rhyme scheme of:
abab, bcbc, cdcd, ee.
A Spenserian Sonnet does not appear to require that the initial octave set up a problem that the closing sestet answers, as with a Petrarchan sonnet. Instead, the form is treated as three quatrains connected by the interlocking rhyme scheme and closed by a couplet. The linked rhymes of his quatrains suggest the linked rhymes of such Italian forms as the Terza Rima that uses interlocking Tercets. It creates a lovely pattern that stretches out the b and c rhymes quite nicely.

This photograph was taken by the author himself, in May, 2012.


Chapter 380
The Bruin Blend

By Treischel


Once this land was the providence of bears.
Fierce and proud, they all wandered everywhere.
A fighting form, no other foe would dare
to take them on. In strength, none could compare.
For they could tear, and shred with mighty paws.
Their massive jaws and lethal claws impair.
But then a change came rolling in on wheels,
where unaware, the bear's fate now it seals,
as many men start hunting them for meals,
and for their coat. So warm and soft it feels,
it appeals to unbridled, endless lust.
And so bears must adjust to such ordeals.
Away from men, the bruins took to trees,
where they blend to the elements with ease.
The hunters look for them, but no one sees,
as bear coats blend, to the subtlest degrees,
with bark of trees. They hide among the roots,
whose attributes conceal them, where they've squeezed.

Author Notes Bears do blend in to their environment quite well, but this is actually just a tree root on Harriet Island by downtown St. Paul, Minnesota, that sure looks a lot like a bear, when viewed from the right angle. So this poem will become part of my Animated Still collection. Animated stills are poems where inanimate objects take on human, animal, or spirit forms, traits, or articles. They are derived from Photographs I have taken, that have moved me to write a poem associated with it.

Providence - guided by nature, or God
Subtlest is read as 3 syllables.

The format of this poem is an Awdl - Hir a Thoddaid
An Awdl - Hir a Thoddaid is a Welsh form of poetry. There are twelve Awdl forms. An Awdl is a Welsh ode. This form contains a ten syllable quatrain followed by a Toddaid. A Hir is a set of four Isosyllabic (10 Syllables, no fixed meter) lines with the same mono-rhymed endline. A Thoddaid is the couplet with the cross rhyme aspect.
All lines of each stanza, except for the penultimate one, rhyme together in the conventional way. The penultimate line rhymes with them all in an unconventional way - an inline syllable. Furthermore, the word at the end of the penultimate line rhymes with a word somewhere in the middle of the last line. The Hir can have 6 lines, rather than the 4 used here, but all its lines must always mono-rhyme together. Frequently the stanzas are blended together without blank lines between, as I have chosen here, to give it a more Welsh feel.
Once Again,
A poem of either 6 or 8 lines.
Stanzaic: Consisting of a Hir (being either a mono-rhymed quatrain or sestet,
and a toddaid which is a couplet with interlaced rhyme.
Isosyllabic: 10 syllables
Rhyme Scheme: aaaa(ab)(ba), where the letters in parens show how the inline rhyme goes.

This photograph was taken by the author himself on March 6, 2016.


Chapter 381
Winter's Will

By Treischel


Such power locked within the Ice!
Where water's flow is overcome,
Old Winter's grip is like a vice.
Beneath, the muted currents hum,
before their songs to cold succumb.

For once, a tumbling torrent raged
into this chasm deep, unbound.
Where summer symphonies were staged,
and none would guess it could be caged,
cold Winter's will was most profound.

Now flows are frozen fast today,
where once fell mighty waterfall,
and even little children play
beneath that frosted crystal wall,
while veils of icy mists enthrall.

As we recall a thund'rous roar.
the cascade now is hardened ground.
It seems, not dangerous anymore,
since Nature's made a frozen floor.
Yes, Winter's will is most profound.

Author Notes This is a compilation of two photographs that I took of Minnehaha Falls, in Minneapolis, Minnesota. One was taken in the spring, while the other on was taken in the winter. They were in two different years, but from about the same location. Look at the bridge above the falls to see that. Usually the mist from the falls coats the walls around the falls first, the last to freeze is the falls itself.

This poem is a Double Dizain, which are just two Dizains.
A Dizain is a ten line poem with either 8 or 10 syllables.

The rhyme scheme is: ababb ccdcd
I have used eight.

In a Dizian you can divide the poem if you wish into two five line stanzas or two four line stanzas and a couplet. I chose the first format.

Both photographs were taken by the author himself. The winter scene was taken January 23, 2016. The spring picture was taken May 6, 2011.


Chapter 382
The Miracle on Ice

By Treischel




A Miracle!
A Miracle!
We won the game!
We won the Game!
As odds proclaimed a miracle,
The game we won was spectacle.

Hurray, for USA!
Hurray, for USA!
The Russians lost!
The Russians lost!
Because the Russians lost today,
For USA, I'll shout HURRAY!

They said, no chance!
They said, no chance!
The victors overcame!
The victor's overcame!
Despite they said we have no chance,
The victors overcame. Let's dance!

For USA, I'll shout HURRAY!
As odds proclaimed a miracle,
Because the Russians lost today,
The game we won was spectacle.
Despite they said we have no chance,
The victors overcame. Let's dance!

Author Notes Although this is not one of my favorite formats, I thought its repetition would be a good way to express the emotions reflected in this statue of Herb Brooks, located in front of the River Center's Ordway entrance in downtown St. Paul. Herb was the head coach of the 1980 USA Olympic hockey team that defeated the Russians in a game that became known as "The Miracle on Ice." Herb is a native Minnesotan, and was head coach of the University of Minnesota hockey team from which, several of the Olympic players also came. His exuberant style, as depicted here, lead the team to victory.

This poem is a Paradelle.
I was introduced to this format by Fanstorian Sunnilicious, in her poem, The Jewel Box.
Paradelle is a French form of poetry with many repeated lines. It is considered difficult to write. It is comprised of 4 stanzas that build within, as well as upon, each other. The format is as follows:
In Stanzas 1, 2 and 3 - lines 1 & 2 of each stanza are short, identical repeats of each other, as are line 3 & 4 also identical in the stanza. However, lines 5 & 6 are rhymed statements made up of all the words in lines 1 & 3. So the short statements become a rhymed couplet, by adding a few other words.
But Stanza 4 is a compilation of all the rhyming couplets (two from each stanza) to make its own stanza of six lines. They don't don't have to be in the same order necessarily.
So the rhyme scheme becomes;
AABB(x1)(x2) - CCDD(x3)(x4) - EEFF(x5)(x6) - (x1)(x2)(x3)(x4)(x5)(x6) , where the capital letters indicate identically repeated lines, and the numbered x is a compilation of a capitalized line to make up a line of the couplet.

I hope that makes some sense.

This photograph was taken by the author himself on January 31, 2016.


Chapter 383
City Dwelling

By Treischel



When city-dwelling architecture reigns,
It stacks the masses high in cozy crates
That simulate the Aztec's vast domains,
Or towers reaching up to Heaven's gates.

Come see apartments in the sky
Where Falcons home
As birds of feather flock
From bottom to the top

The architects create fine living space,
As density creates a jumbled stew,
Where even birds succumb to urban life
When city-dwelling architecture reigns.



Author Notes This is an Ekphrastic poem in that, it is created based upon the inspiration of this photograph. I loved the juxtaposition of the bird apartment with the modern apartments in Minneapolis. The one reminded me of an Aztec pyramid temple. The other a stylish tower. My reference to crates is to reflect that, no matter how stylish the exterior, an apartment is still a box. I hope you caught the simile of the birds of a feather. I also hinted, with a metaphor, to the tower of Babel. Another aspect is that, as architects create, so does the very fact of density. These days too, Peregrine Falcons are nesting on skyscrapers and other towers.

This poem is a Dorsimbra. I was introduced to it today while reviewing Flylikeaneagle's poem, Shining Lights.
The Dorsimbra, a poetry form created by Eve Braden, Frieda Dorris and Robert Simonton. So, by combining their names you get Dorsimbra. It is a set form of three stanzas of four lines each. Since the Dorsimbra requires three different sorts of form writing, enjambment can help to achieve fluidity between stanzas, while internal rhymes and near-rhymes can help tie the stanzas together. (You can Google ENJAMBMENT, and IAMBIC PENTAMETER).

Stanza One: Four lines of iambic pentameter, rhymed abab.
Stanza Two: Four lines of short and snappy free verse.
Stanza Three: Four lines of iambic pentameter blank verse, where the last line repeats the first line of Stanza One.

This photograph was taken by the author himself on February 20, 2016.


Chapter 384
As River Flows to Ocean

By Treischel

Flowing water, 'round the bend
to the Ocean, in the end,
is the life-blood of creation,
quenching thirsts of every nation.
We cannot ignore our planets precious gift,
its uses shift,
as river flows ~ to ocean.

We harness river's power,
travel on it by the hour.
Water-wheels raise the milling yields,
even irrigate farmer's fields.
There is no end to the things that water does.
There never was,
as river flows ~ to ocean.

'Round our rivers cities grow,
people drink the water's flow.
In its currents they are washing.
Some receive the Baptist's blessing,
and all our crops become nourished when it floods.
We'll have some buds,
as river flows ~ to ocean

Even birds, who coast on air,
need pure liquid for their care.
If we want to keep our eagles,
flocks of geese, and even sea gulls,
then don't pollute the environments they take,
for heaven's sake,
as river flows ~ to ocean.

Things live below its surface,
these creatures depend on us,
and forest beasts need water too!
They use the rivers flowing through.
Prepare a prayer, that we all become aware,
of what we share,
as river flows ~ to ocean.

We've been known to toss our trash,
drain our chemical potash,
into vital river currents,
as if our local waters weren't
essential to our neighbors who live downstream,
and in between,
as river flows ~ to ocean.

Fed by the rains of Heaven,
by melting snow, it's driven.
Without it, couldn't grow the trees,
or sustain our societies.
We'd be left with only burning desert sands,
across all lands,
no river then - or ocean.

Let's respect its purity,
use our creativity,
to protect our precious waters
for this planet's sons and daughters.
Fortune may remain then many years to come,
for every one,
as river flows ~ to ocean.

We are keepers of our fate.
So, before it's way too late,
please heed subtle Future's warning,
don't let acid clouds keep forming,
or we'll be faced by a deadly holocaust,
where all is lost,
as river flows ~ to ocean.



Author Notes This is the Mississippi River in Minneapolis at St. Anthony Falls. It has a multi-layered lock and dam here. Minneapolis grew up around this falls. It became the source of hydro-electric power for the city, and its mills helped create the fortunes of Pillsbury, and Washburn (who founded General Mills). Recently, the locks have been permanently closed to river traffic, in order to prevent the invasion of Asian Carp by gaining access to the upper Mississippi region.

Potash - potassium containing compounds used in agriculture.


Syllable count: 7,7,8,8,11,4,7, with a mixed meter.
Rhyme scheme: aabbccR.

This photograph was taken by the author himself on February 20, 2016.


Chapter 385
Turtle Tree

By Treischel


Turtle, master of the mud,
during legends of The Flood,
your shell held slimy crud of newborn Earth.
Your worth is ancient blood.

Turtle thoughts, reputed wise.
Shell that shuts when threats arise.
It's no surprise a tortoise lives so long.
So strong, we glamorize.

Turtle, it's your placid pace
that so often wins the race.
You wisely never chase something too fast.
You last, with grandest grace.

Turtle, you are amazing.
Do I see you gently grazing
here, while I'm appraising these tangled root's
attributes, so dazing?

Turtle, image in the wood,
saw you clearly where I stood.
Can't comprehend just how you could be there.
I swear, you're just driftwood.

Author Notes Here is another amazing tree root that I found along the Mississippi that looks just like a Turtle. So this poem will become part of my Animated Still collection. Animated stills are poems where inanimate objects take on human, animal, or spirit forms, traits, or articles. They are derived from photographs I have taken, that have moved me to write a poem associated with it.

Turtles are frequently depicted in popular culture as easygoing, patient, and wise creatures. Due to their long lifespan, slow movement, sturdiness, and wrinkled appearance, they are an emblem of longevity and stability in many cultures around the world. They have an important role in mythologies, and are often implicated in creation myths regarding the origin of the Earth, which describe a large cosmic turtle holding the earth upon its shell. Some cultures describe islands as the back of a large turtle. Many Native American cultures tell a story related to the Great Flood, whereby a man with supernatural powers sends various creatures diving down to get some mud from the drowned earth, in order to form a new earth. Then he places the mud on a turtle's back to float and grow into earth as we now know it. Source: Wikipedia.

This poem is a Englyn Unodle.
An Englyn Unodle is a Welsh poetic format. It is comprised of two seven syllable lines, one of ten syllables, and one of six syllables. There is a common rhyme at the seventh syllable of the ten syllable line and last syllable of the six syllable line). The last syllable of the ten syllable line assonates or aliterates with the third syllable of six syllable line. There are two types. If the two seven syllables lines are on top, it's a Union (which I have here). If they are at the bottom of the stanza, then its a Crwca. Below I show an example where the Xs are just syllables and the letters show the rhyme. The first stanza is the Union layout, while the second is the Crwca. So the rhyme scheme of each stanza becomes:
a, a,(a,b),(b,a) for the Union, and (a,b),(b,a),a,a for the Crwca.
where the lines in parens represent the inline-endline rhyme structure. For example, below I show two stanza layouts.

Union Layout:
x x x x x x a
x x x x x x a
x x x x x x a x x b
x x b x x a

Crwca Layout:
x x x x x x a x x b
x x b x x a
x x x x x x a
x x x x x x a

This photograph was taken by the author himself on January 31, 2016.


Chapter 386
Trail Transitions

By Treischel

Trails I wander over yonder, nothing's fonder to my eyes.
On twisting trails, through hills and vales, my spirit sails. It really flies!

The lovely scenes - the reds, the greens - the in-betweens, to my delight,
all lift my soul. They make me whole as I extoll them, when I write.


Author Notes This is a picture of the park near my house where my wife and I frequently walk. This was in the fall. We enjoy this well paved path.

This poem is a Rhupunt
The Rhupunt is another Welsh poetic format. It contains four syllable lines in each stanza, which can be of three, four or five lines a..a..a..B. The next stanza rhymes the similar c..c..c..B. The rhyme could change for the next stanzas. We end up with a pattern thus:


x x x a
x x x a
x x x a
x x x B

x x x c
x x x c
x x x c
x x x B

It is common to join the lines together and end up with the two stanzas making a line each. The following stanzas would do the same and the result is as shown below in the Rhupunt long.
x x x a x x x a x x x a x x x B
x x x c x x x c x x x c x x x B

This photograph was taken by the author himself on October 2, 2015.


Chapter 387
Winter River Wither

By Treischel

Traffic on river
wants ice to wither,
then they'll deliver
wonderful trips.
For, once it is gone,
they'll send who gets on
to hither and yon,
right from these slips.

Along the St Croix,
you'll hear, "Ships ahoy!"
as sailors employ
nautical crafts.
Then whistles will blow,
while tugs give a tow,
and smokestack steams flow
in windy drafts.

As the coal fires burn
to make engines turn,
the paddle wheels churn
at vessel's aft.
But those at the rail
would gasp and exhale,
they suddenly sail,
and children laughed.

We're not there quite yet.
The ice, still a threat.
So, don't be upset,
because it drips
as temperature warms.
Then river transforms
and covers with swarms
of all these ships.

Author Notes My wife and I took a walk along the St. Croix river at Stillwater, Minnesota, on Saturday. There were all kinds of river boats waiting for the season to start. The ice was not off everywhere along the river, but it won't be long now. Many of the boats were colorful paddle-wheelers. It got me imagining the bustle that is about to begin. The St. Croix is a beautiful river that flows into the Mississippi just below St. Paul. The west side of the river is Minnesota, while the east side is Wisconsin.

This poem is a Cyhydedd Hir.
A Cyhydedd Hir is a form of Welsh poetry composed of Octaves (8 Line Stanzas). I was attracted to it because I love poems that carry 3 consecutive rhymes, and this one carries two sets and two other rhymed lines, with one between the two sets in tri-rhyme (called Hir, because they mono-rhyme), and the other at the end. Each quatrain has three lines of five syllables that carry the '"a" rhyme.The fourth line is of four syllables and carries the main rhyme of "b". Then three lines of 5 syllables with a "c" rhyme, but the last line reverts to the "b" rhyme again. So the rhyme scheme of each stanza is:
a,a,a,b,c,c,c,b.
The syllable count is: 5,5,5,4,5,5,5,4.
There can be as many stanzas as the author chooses.

If desired each quatrain can be written as a single 19 - syllable line. Each stanza would then revert back to a series of 19 - syllable couplets. I chose not to do that here.

Below is an example of a two stanza Cyhydedd Hir, where the Xs represent syllables, and the letters represent the rhymes. In mine, I varied it a bit. For the forth and eighth lines of stanzas 1 & 4, I matched the "b" rhymes (trips, slips, drips, ships), but for stanzas 2 & 3, I matched to a new rhyme set (crafts, drafts, aft, laughed). This is known as pairing stanzas. The other option is to hold the "b" rhyme throughout every stanza.

x x x x a
x x x x a
x x x x a
x x x B
x x x x c
x x x x c
x x x x c
x x x B

x x x x d
x x x x d
x x x x d
x x x B
x x x x e
x x x x e
x x x x e
x x x B

etc

These photos were taken by the author himself on March 12, 2016. Then compiled into this collage.


Chapter 388
Sin

By Treischel



Pi to the 65th Digit
(3.1415926535897932846264338327950288419716939937510582097494459230)



3.                    SIN.
141592           I have a sense squeezing me.
653589           Dozing while now among creeping fuzziness.
793284           Nothing objective was in immediate play,
626433           before my sleepy head was out,
832795           drifting off in languid catatonic state.
0
288419           So, listless flounder that I represent,
716939           showing a torpid spiritual ego unguarded,
93751             demonized net entraps numb I.
0
582                  Demon snatches me!
0
974944           Unknowing victim's soul committed from Hell,
5923               after victories of sin.
0
78164           "Whisper, alleluia!" a spirit says.
0


 

Author Notes Languid - weak, sluggish, slow
Catatonic - being in a stupor, non-responsive, unaware
Listless - drowsy, quiet
Torpid - sluggish, dormant
Demonized - to be controlled by, or of demons

When you commit sins, especially several even small ones, you put out a welcome mat. A sign welcoming demons in. They may creep up on you then, even when you're sleeping. It's a victory for them. But they don't sing "Alleluia" in loud exclamations. Oh no, theirs is a sly secretive whisper.

I missed national Pi day, but was reminded of it and the Piem format when I reviewed Pantygynt's birthday tribute to I Am Cat. So, I was inspired to write one.

This Poem is a Piem.
Piems are described in Wikipedia as follows:
Piems (a "portmanteau", formed by combining pi and poem) are poems that represent PI in a way such that the length of each word (in letters) represents a digit in the value of PI. So what I did here is, after the initial "3." (which I used as the Title), broke the decimal digits into groupings of six, to create each line of free verse poetry, wherever possible. However, there is no word for the digit "0", so that became the stanza breaks for me. So the trick here, in this type of poem, is to find and combine words that match the required digits for each line, and still come up with a cohesive story. Of course, there are only two words that have 1 digit in English - "I" and "a", so give me a bit of license here. Punctuation is added in order to assist in reading and interpreting the story, but does not factor into the digit counts.

This picture is from Yahoo images.


Chapter 389
Space Shuttle Launch

By Treischel


Canaveral, sits tiled bird on pitted launching pad,
Sleek silhouette caressed by towers, heavy cable clad,
Huge rocket boosters piggyback a cargo laden crew,
Ready for a raucous ride to an atmosphere breakthrough.
Check the weather, avoid all lightning strikes.
Check all the systems for safety, or the likes.
Check the astronauts are set and locked into their seats.
Check checklist items as the preparation task completes.
Now is the time, when the countdown starts, as the planning phase is done,
Where the switch is pushed, and the engines roar, while counting: three, two, one.

Once those fettered dreams of man slip the bonds of Earth,
The cosmic journey then began revealing worth.

The crew absorbs G-forces at the summit of their soul,
As systems interact to bring the whole thing in control.
The bird then rolls, with pitch and yaw, as it locates its path,
Expending one half million gallons fuel in aftermath.
Blow the boosters now, T minus seconds.
Ignite the orbiter, to coast at thousands
Of miles above the Earth, beyond its basic atmosphere,
Where window views of the vast heavens, suddenly come clear.
Then the hearts of the men in the capsule slow, to a normal pace,
As they bask in the pride of accomplishments by the Human Race

Once those fettered dreams of man slip the bonds of Earth,
The cosmic journey then began revealing worth.

Dreams forever to fly, to fly so high,
With shuttle flights to space, we try, we try!
We slip the bonds, the fettered bonds of Earth,
In cosmic journey, for our pride, our worth.

Author Notes Just trying to poetically describe a launch of the space shuttle. The company that I worked for had many control systems used on the program, both on the shuttle itself, and in much of the control center. I had some friends who worked on the shuttle program, though I never did. It was a sad day when they shut the program down in 2011. The Space Shuttle system is composed of an orbiter launched with two reusable solid rocket boosters and a disposable external fuel tank usually carried up to eight astronauts and up to 50,000 lb (23,000 kg) of payload into low Earth orbit. Space Shuttle missions have included:
Spacelab missions.
Crystal growth
Space physics
Construction of the International Space Station (ISS)
Crew rotation and servicing of Mir
Servicing missions, such as to repair the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) and orbiting satellites
Manned experiments in low Earth orbit (LEO)
Carried to low Earth orbit (LEO):
The Hubble Space Telescope (HST)
Supplies in Spacehab modules or Multi-Purpose Logistics Modules
The Long Duration Exposure Facility
The Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite
The Compton Gamma Ray Observatory
The Earth Radiation Budget Satellite
The Mir Shuttle Docking Node

This poem is a Tambour.
The Tambour was created by Fanstorian RGstar. A Tambor is a very complex format that uses rhyme and different types of lines to provide pace and rhythm.
''Tambour'' = French for drum.

The reason for the title is the fact that the rhythm of the parade drum is incorporated in the poem. If one can visualize a parade walking by and the sound of the drums as they march through. The poetry is set to mimic the sound and roll of the drums.
It uses 3 line types to gain this effect.
1) 'PACE' LINE= offers speed and an injection of emotion, intense or soft.
2) 'COMMAND' LINE = directs an order or a wish for a special action, strong or soft.
3) 'DRUM ROLL' LINE = creates that special rhythm in answer or in influence to the line before.
As far as I could surmise, these three aspects occur within the 10 line stanzas.

These are fundamental to the ''Tambour'' and without using them it is nearly impossible to create it.
The basic form has three different stanza types. The first has ten long lines containing in-line rhyming on most (but not all) lines, and aabb end-line rhyming , followed by short rhyming couplets, until the last stanza, which has 4 lines that echo the earlier couplets.
Pace lines and the short syllable (Command lines) break up the rhythm of your base, or normal, lines .. followed directly by a long syllable ( Drum roll line) in answer to it or influenced by it. Without these , the Tambour would not be a Tambour.

The PACE lines throughout the poem are very important, because not only do they offer a break of rhythm, but what they contain or what they say are equally as important as syllables and rhythms they make.

There is no fixed meter, just the drum beats and rolls.
So here is an attempt at one. I hope I got it right.

This picture is from Yahoo images.


Chapter 390
Stillwater Trolley Car

By Treischel





A jolly Stillwater Trolley car
Exists here along this small town street,
In the parking lot by mooring slips,
Out where river boat tours come and go
Upstream and down, dawn to early dusk.

As passengers wait to cross the ramp,
Eager to come aboard local fleet,
Interest in the Popcorn Stand begins.
Olfactory senses twitch, scents take hold,
Upon the breezes the crowds suck up.

Any near that aromatic car,
Enters trance-like state of money spend,
Instigated by the smells within
Outdoor Trolley's hypnotic control.
Ultimately, many spend a buck.

Yes, it's hard to resist the Trolley.
Yet, savored flavor leaves them jolly.

 

Author Notes I recently took a walk at the town of Stillwater, Minnesota. It's still winter, so there is no river traffic, leaves on trees, street vendors, or running trolley cars, yet. In fact, there was still some ice on the St. Croix River. But I spotted this colorful popcorn vendor's shop sitting there, ready for the season to start. There actually is a matching, moving trolley car that can be ridden around town, in the summertime. This particular one attracts a lot of business then, selling popcorn, caramelcorn, fudge, candy, smoothies, and soda drinks, as it's right by where the passengers load up to board the paddleboats.

Pantygynt introduced me to this style of poetic format with his poem, Railing Rattler.

This poem is a Vowelogram.
A Vowelogram is a poetic format the keys off the vowels used in the end-line words of a poem. It has five lines that use the five principal English vowels in their correct order A,E,I,O,U in the final stressed syllable of each line, which should end with the same consonantal sound. Thus there can be no true rhymes but five near rhymes in each stanza. Femimine rhyme and endings are permitted. Any metrical form may be used.

In addition to those requirements, I added some spice by starting every line with those same vowels (not a requirement). Further, the vowels sometimes include Y (A,E,I,O,U, and sometimes Y), so I added a closing rhyming couplet that included Y (also not a requirement). However, I couldn't achieve the near rhyme, so I did this one in free verse fashion, but did hold a syllable count of 9. I varied the vowel aspect in the couplet, because here I had rhyme.

This picture was taken by the author himself on March 11, 2016.


Chapter 391
Skateboard Park

By Treischel


At the skateboard park,
the local teens practice skills.
Many ups and downs
may result in sudden spills,
but the best keep rolling on.




Author Notes This skateboard park is located in Cottage Grove, Minnesota.

This poem is a 5-7-5-7-7 Poem.
It is a 5 line poem that has the syllable count of the numbers in the format's name. This is not a Tanka because it contains rhyme, alliteration, punctuation, and a gerund (ing-word), all of which disqualify is from the Japanese format. So it is a very American structure that mimics the Japanese structure only.

This picture was taken by the author himself on March 10, 2016.


Chapter 392
The Guthrie Theater

By Treischel



The Guthrie shows its face,
a place where Shakespeare plays
on theater stages,
in big drama displays.

Where its unique hallways
provide artistic room
for actor's words to flow,
and eloquently loom.

The architects have shaped
a place with its own style,
with aspects that engage
the patrons for a while.

The Guthrie shows its face
in Minneapolis,
revealing civic charm
in this Metropolis.


Author Notes The Guthrie Theater is located in downtown Minneapolis. It is a building of unique archetecture that houses several theater companies. Our daughter, Jodette, gave my wife and I tickets to see a play last spring as a combination Mother's Day/Farther's Day gift. It is quite an eclectic building the overlooks St. Anthony falls and the Mississippi River. That long overhang is a ramp that juts out to give patrons a lovely view of the area, complete with benched patio area. Those yellow windows above are in another viewing area for visitors. That long tower at the top, is actually a digital billboard, where the letters climb up it, to declare the main attraction. There may be as many as 4 plays going on in one of its many theater rooms.
According to Wikipedia, the Guthrie Theater, founded in 1963, is a center for theater performance, production, education, and professional training in Minneapolis, Minnesota. It is the result of the desire of Sir Tyrone Guthrie, Oliver Rea, and Peter Zeisler to create a resident acting company that would produce and perform the classics in an atmosphere removed from the commercial pressures of Broadway. In 1959, Sir Tyrone Guthrie published a small invitation in the drama page of The New York Times soliciting communities' interest and involvement in a resident theater. Out of the seven cities that responded, the Twin Cities showed not only interest but also eagerness for the project, teaming with the University of Minnesota. This is the second building to house the theater company. The first theater was completed in 1963 in time for the May 7 opening of Hamlet. In 2006, the Guthrie finished construction of a new $125 million theater building. The design is the work of Jean Nouvel, and is a 285,000 square foot facility that houses three primary theaters: the theater's signature thrust stage, seating 1,100, a 700-seat proscenium stage, and a black-box studio with flexible seating. It also has a 178-foot cantilevered bridge (called the "Endless Bridge") to the Mississippi which is open to visitors during normal building hours. The outside of the building's walls are covered in large panels which display a large mural of photographs from past plays visible clearly at night.

This poem is an Ampeletum.
I was introduced to it by fellow FanStorian tfawcus.
The Ampeletum was created several years ago by FanStorian JeJo. The name is derived from "ampel-" denoting vines and "-etum" meaning a grove or garden (as in Arboretum). Thus, the name signifies the way rhymes keep twisting around, coming back to life.

It consists of four stanzas with a rhyme scheme of:
Abcb, bded, fgcg, Aehe where capital A is an exact repeated line.
There are just six syllables per line and any meter can be used.

This photograph was taken by the author himself, on a recent walk nearby it, on February 20, 2016.


Chapter 393
Oaken Arms

By Treischel



I see these mighty oaks in spring,
Before their leaves begin to bud,
When melting snow's turned earth to mud,
But prior to the springtime flood.

I see these mighty oaks in spring,
Stand tall, to spread majestic limbs
In grandest geometric whims,
That softly whisper wind-borne hymns.

So, see these mighty oaks in spring!
Their branches, feathered to fine lace,
Caress the sky with stunning grace,
In arching swirls their fingers trace.

Delight their naked springtime charms
That frame the world with oaken arms.


Author Notes I love to see the intricate patterns of the trees in the winter and spring, as all the branches are exposed, down to the smallest fingers. Especially the oak trees, as their branches spread so majestically. I often shoot photographs of them. I captured these at Harriet Island, which is directly across from downtown St. Paul, Minnesota. Here, you see them framing the Cathedral of St. Paul.

This poem is a Triptic Sonnet.
The Triptic Sonnet is a format that I created, based on my great appreciation of triple lined verse. You see, I like poems that have triple consecutive rhymes. I feel that really brings the rhyme to life. So, I incorporated that here in this Sonnet. The name Triptic derives from the triple scheme.

A Triptic Sonnet has the usual 14 lines, consisting of three quatrains with a rhyming couplet, and a volta at line 9. What distinguishes it is the rhyme scheme and meter. The fist line of each quatrain rhyme with each other, interlinking the stanzas. The next 3 lines of the stanza all ryhme, creating a elegant echo effect. The rhyme scheme is:
abbb accc addd ee
It is written in any iambic meter. I chose iambic tetrameter here (8 syllables, or 4 poetic feet).

This photograph was taken by the author himself on March 6, 2016.


Chapter 394
Dangled Art

By Treischel




What art doth dangle here from ancient trees?
If art, indeed, these twisted visions be.
Or could they merely be some strange bird's nest,
providing airy comfort, at its best?
Nay, these proclaim a man's hand, I attest,
these wicker baskets hanging in the breeze.

Oh, subtle is the art's imagination,
adorning local riverside pathways.
They dwell in places that hold high our gaze,
and render these rare forms appreciation.


Author Notes These strange objects were hanging in the trees and swaying in the breeze, along a river pathway in Hastings, Minnesota. As they are approached from a distance, you can't tell what they are. I approached with curiosity and a touch of fear, as to what they might be. It's only as you get closer, you see they are handmade wicker art pieces.

This poem is a Curtal Sonnet, written in the more ancient format of the form.
There is a bit of controversy about the format as to its true structure, its pedigree, and even if it can be called a sonnet. Most sources (including Wikipedia, Poetry Soup, The Poet's Garret, Sonnet Central, and even Webster's dictionary) identify it as a "curtailed" sonnet, and identify the creator of the form as Gerard Manley Hopkins in 1877 using his radical "sprung rhythm." His format has 10.5 lines that are arranged in two stanzas. The first stanza has rhyme scheme abcabc, and the second is either dbcdc or dcbdc. The very last line is indented and shorter. It is, depending on what expert say about the curtal sonnet, either described as a half-line or a single spondee. Hopkins described it as the former, but usually executed it as the latter. It should have a pivot between the sestet and quintet.
However, a site called Poetry Through the Ages, described it this way. "The 10-line, two-stanza Curtal Sonnet actually pre-dated the Petrarchan form, but was only used by the more masterful structural poets. A good example is embedded within the 29 movements of Dante's, La Vita Nuova."
Dante's Curtal Sonnet predates Hopkins by 400 years. It had a rhyme scheme of aabbba cddc, in a more typical meter. So I consider Hopkin's format, with its weird meter, nonsense. I post here with the Dante format as my true example.

This photograph was taken by the author himself on March 8, 2016.


Chapter 395
Golden Painted Sky

By Treischel




As sun was going down, I made a turn,
and suddenly beheld a sky so bold,
beside a burnished lake reflecting gold,
its colors so intense, it seemed to burn.
Believing it a blessing to behold,
I stopped, bewitched, and made a silent prayer
of gratitude, while skepticisms churn.
For this meets any masterpiece of old,
a priceless gem, as any judge discern.
Yet, here it was, a golden painted sky,
as dusk devoured remnants of the day.
A tinted lake and amber colored air
aloft, was spread in radiant display.
It caught the muse of grateful poet's eye.



Author Notes I photographed this lovely golden sunset at Lake Phalen in St. Paul, Minnesota, when my wife and I stopped and watched it set.

This poem is a Tuckerman Sonnet
Frederick Goddard Tuckerman (February 4, 1821 - May 9, 1873) was an American poet, remembered mostly for his sonnet series. Tuckerman wrote sonnets with free abandon and with virtually no regard for any kind of pattern at all. His Sonnets burst from the gate in a flurry of rhyme, without any stanzas, then, after the first few lines, rhymes fall seemingly at random, as in his "Sonnets, First Series," which rhymes:
a b b a b c a b a d e c e d,with a volta at L10.
He was a reclusive comtemporary of Emily Dickenson, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Ralph Waldo Emerson and Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, and acquaintance of Alfred, Lord Tennyson, but remained in relative obscurity, even with several published works.

This photograph was taken by the author himself on May 19, 2012.


Chapter 396
Daily Walk

By Treischel


We so enjoy a lively, daily walk,
to just experience the great outside.
As two can hold their hands and talk,
while sauntering along in pleasant stride.

It takes us places to embrace the scene.
We so enjoy a lively, daily walk.
In city, countryside, or in between,
We love the images that they unlock.

Sometimes we'll contemplate, sometimes just gawk.
I'll be inspired to write poetic verse.
We so enjoy a lively, daily walk;
to exercise, explore, enjoy, converse.

Some days we're lead across a city bridge,
at other times, in woods to see a hawk,
or spotting wildlife out upon a ridge.
We so enjoy a lively, daily walk.


Author Notes This is from a walk across the Stone Arch Bridge in Minneapolis. Minnesota, as we go back towards the city. The bridge crosses the Mississippi River.

This poem is a Modified Quatern.
The Quatern is a French form of poetry that is composed of four quatrains (four-line stanzas). It is similar to the Kyrielle and other French poems, in that it has a repeated refrain. But, unlike other French forms, it doesn't have to rhyme--there is no rhyme scheme specified. Similar to other French forms of poetry, the Quatern consists of lines with eight syllables each. The Refrain starts as the first line of the first Stanza, then the second line of the second, the third of the third, and the last line of the fourth stanza. So it moves through the poem in a cascade.
However, I wrote this one in iambic Pentameter, with a rhyme scheme of:
Abab cAca adAd eaeA, where the capital letter represents the repeated refrain.

This photograph was taken by the author himself on February 22, 2016.







Chapter 397
Bus Stop

By Treischel



Oh see! Such opulent display is thus!
A cupola in stone, to catch a bus?
A simple shelter from the rain for us.
That's all a touring traveler should need.
Although, impressive structure, it's agreed.

Author Notes This elaborate bus stop is in downtown St. Paul, Minnesota, near Galtier Plaza. Although extravagant, it is impressive.

This Poem is a Sonnetino.
The Sonnetino is a very short, Sonnet-like format, created by fellow Fanstorian, lightink. Jyoti modeled it after the 10 Line Curtal Sonnet. Here are her instructions.
Sonnetino:
-A five line poem (Quintrain), comprising a Tercet and Couplet
-Rhyme Scheme, aaabb
-Written in iambic pentameter.
-The tercet presents a scene or conflict,
and the closing couplet offers conclusion or resolution (with an optional turn).

This photograph was taken by the author himself on April 2, 2016.


Chapter 398
Rosebud in Springtime

By Treischel


1. The Promise -- A Petrarchan Sonnet

A rosebud in the springtime, tiny sprout,
A promise that adorns those naked thorns,
as yesterday's lost brilliance Winter mourns,
thy latent beauty hides 'til coming out.
Contained within cruel seasonal redoubt,
thou burst in colors that thy past forewarns.
Content to wait the signals thus reborn,
shall wait to see such loveliness you flout.

For then, thy day will come, when all is right,
as heat and moisture beckon when to grow.
Within a rush, as messages unite,
thy pod erupts, revealing all to show
its coded colors, beautiful and bright --
the sweetest blossoms souls could ever know.



2. The Emergence -- An English Sonnet

The sweetest blossoms souls could ever know,
begin within the stir of Nature's song.
Each petal swirls, unfurls, to Maestro's bow --
a movement meant to bring its force along.

Unwrapping with the grace of dance ballet,
corollas sway to tunes that Chloris sings.
as springtime's balladeers often portray
this goddess as the one who blesses Spring.

For, is a rose in spring not Nature's gift
of colors bright and scents of sweet perfume?
Indeed, its purest beauty can uplift,
while balm of rose aromas richly loom.

Such attributes of roses soon attest,
when roses bloom in springtime, we are blessed.



3. Full Bloom -- A Spenserian Sonnet

When roses bloom in springtime, we are blessed.
Thou kissed by sun to flash in morning dew,
on hues that painter's pallets once possessed,
by masters on Parisian's famous rue,
bring swirls of pink, or yellow, red or blue.
Once Spring releases messages to blush,
thy resins rise in petals, to shine through,
and grace yon gardens with good Nature's brush.
upon thy flowers brandishing their bush.
Let's not forget that first portent of Spring,
when sap formed buds within its fluent rush,
and promised real delights that springtime brings.
          There's no surprise there's happiness to tout -
          A Rosebud in the springtime, tiny sprout.



 

Author Notes What better promise of the coming spring as when the roses bud?

Redoubt - stronghold, prison
Corollas - the petals of a flower
Chloris - the Greek goddess of flowers and spring.
Rue - French word for street
Brandishing - to hold forth with exuberance or excitement, flourish, showoff

This poem is a Tiara of Sonnets.
Fellow Fanstorian, I Am Cat came up with this brilliant concept and should be commended for it.
It is based on the concept of the Crown of Sonnets, which has a sequence of seven Sonnets, interlinked by last-to-first lines, and concluding with the final line being the same as the first line of the first Sonnet. Thus creating a circle that is the Crown. The Tiara of Sonnets, then, has the same concept, but with only three Sonnets. Thus a much smaller Tiara, rather than a Crown.

For this Tiara, since there are three primary Sonnet formats (the Petrarchan, the English, and the Spensarian), I thought I'd write one segment in each format here.

Hope you enjoy it.

This photograph was taken by the author himself in April of 2012.


Chapter 399
Skyway

By Treischel



When conscience says, "You need to walk today,"
But weather limits trails for a foray,
A pleasant option is the town's skyway.

There's lots to see and do in warm skyway,
no delay excuse to going today,
nor outerwear required for this foray.

So grab a friend, and plan a fun foray,
inside the buildings linked by a skyway.
you won't regret you got out there today.

Plan skyway foray today, don't delay.

Author Notes Skyways were invented here in Minnesota during the 1960's. Because of our bitter winters, we created ways to get around without being exposed to the weather. Prior to that, tunnels were the most common way to do it. Today, one can walk all over downtown St. Paul and Minneapolis, in deep winter, or heavy rain, without the need for a coat. This is a recent shot I took of some ladies in a skyway.

This poem is a Tritina.
A Tritina, which is a shorter cousin to the Sestina, involves using three, three-line stanzas (Tercets), and a final concluding line. Rather than rhyming, the three "end words" are used to conclude the lines of each stanza, in a set interweaving pattern of: ABC, CAB, BCA,
and all three end words must appear together in the final line.
Neither Tritina nor Sestina require a specific meter or line length, although 10 syllables is the most commonly used.
However, if you choose words that rhyme, as I have done here, you get a rhyming poem that interweaves the rhyme sequence. For this poem, I chose the three end words to be - today, foray, and skyway, giving me mono-rhymed Tercets.

This photograph was taken by the author himself on April 6, 2016.


Chapter 401
Eagle Perch

By Treischel



Stand tall upon thy perch of gnarled limbs,
Iconic freedom, spark of battle hymns.
Ignite our thoughts of flight, those soaring whims.
You graced the heavens, as you chased the wind,
While man was once to earthbound surface pinned.

Today, though we may sail to higher heights,
And dare to dream of interstellar flights,
The visage of an eagle still excites.
As symbol of our nation's civic pride,
Your true majestic stance can't be denied.


Author Notes I spotted this eagle while on a walk in the park the other day.

This poem is a suite of two Sonnetinos (Duo Sonnetinos)
A Sonnetino was created by our very own Fanstorian, lightink. It is a five line poem, written in iambic pentameter. The rhyme scheme is:
aaabb.
The first three lines bring up a topic and
the closing couplet has a turn or a strong closing thought.
She named this form Sonnetino - a teeny tiny sonnet. The word Sonnet is already a diminutive for song. So this is a tiny song.

This photograph was taken by the author himself on April 23, 2016, at Lake Keller in Ramsey County, Minnesota.


Chapter 402
A Book

By Treischel





Open up a new world, when you travel in a book.
As did Alice, through her famous looking glass.
Catch the emotion when Cinderella lost her shoe.

When you read a tale resolved around a crystal shoe,
Life never becomes boring in any handy book.
So optimistically, you'll perceive a half-filled glass.

For time will seem to fly, at the turning hour glass,
With your outlook as shiny as a newly polished shoe,
Where there's knowledge and adventure found in every book.

A tapping shoe, a tipping glass, eyes within a book.


Author Notes A book is like a journey in your mind. I try to keep them at hand.

For this format, I randomly selected three words by looking around me, then wrote this poem using them. The three words are: glass, book, and shoe. I hope you enjoy this little exercise in poetry.

This poem is a Tritina.
A Tritina, which is a shorter cousin to the Sestina, involves using three, three-line stanzas (Tercets), and a final concluding line, for a total of 10 lines. Rather than rhyming, the three "end words" are used to conclude the lines of each stanza, in a set interweaving pattern of: ABC, CAB, BCA,
and all three end words must appear together in the final line.
Neither Tritina nor Sestina require a specific meter or line length, although 10 syllables is the most commonly used.
It is not rhymed. However, if you choose words that rhyme, you get a rhyming poem that interweaves the rhyme sequence.
For this poem I chose 13 syllables in variable meter, unrhymed.

This photograph was taken by the author himself on April 25, 2016, of one of his bookshelves.


Chapter 403
Blue-winged Teal

By Treischel




A pair of Teal
Adrift, they glide upon a pond.
A pair of Teal,
Their motion silent, so genteel,
They share a life-long bond.
To marshy wetlands, they respond,
A pair of Teal.


Author Notes I spotted this pair of Blue-winged Teal yesterday, when I was out at Carlos Avery State Wildlife Management Area in Anoka, Minnesota. The blue on their wings is hard to spot, unless they are flying, but their face and beaks are very distinctive.

Blue Wing Teal (Anas discors) is a small dabbling duck from North America. The scientific name is derived from Latin, Anas "duck", and discors, "variance", which may refer to the striking face pattern of the male. The breeding habitat of the blue-winged teal is marshes and ponds. They mainly eat plants; their diet may include molluscs and aquatic insects. They are long distance migrators. They are generally the first ducks south in the fall and the last ones north in the spring. Adult drakes depart the breeding grounds well before adult hens and immature young. Most blue-winged teal flocks seen after mid-September are composed largely of adult females and immatures, which is amazing since they are also monogamous and mate for life. So somehow the females track down their mates, who have gone far ahead of them.

This poem is a Rondolet.
The Rondelet is a French repeating form consisting of a single septet with two rhymes and one repeating refrain. the rhyme scheme is:
AbAabbA. The capital letters are the refrains, or repeats.
It contains a short refrain line as the first line that is repeated as line 3 and 7. The longer lines in the stanza are always twice as long as the refrain. So, if the refrain is written in 4 syllables, the other lines are Tetrameter. If the refrain is 5 syllables, then the others are Pentameter. If 6, then Hexameter, and so on.

This photograph was taken by the author himself on May 2, 2016.


Chapter 404
Crabapple Bloom

By Treischel






     1. A Petrarchan Sonnet - Transition

What sheer delights blaze, when Crabapples bloom,
where claret buds soon fill the bluest skies.
A stunning treat to soothe our winter eyes
accustomed to the cold and leaden gloom,
when Boreas blew winds where Winter looms.
Now Zephyr's west winds yield this bright surprise
that carries Spring whose fruits will soon arise
to fill the sky with blossom's sweet perfume.

The Anemoi have fought for Gaia's hand,
as seasons change from dim to bright display.
Mere mortals live within its constant sway,
while greater forces soon transform the land.
Where growth and rebirth stage a springtime stand,
a poet's dreams are made on such a day.


     2. An English Sonnet -- Charm

A Poet's dreams are made on such a day,
when ruby shoots adorn its wooded arms.
The Crabapple displays its winning ways.
In early Spring it shows its greatest charms.

With glowing shades of dark carnelian red,
its petals swathe broad limbs in Nature's jewels,
to grace the azure sky, as branches spread,
declaring now, that brilliant color rules.

Oh Spring, so long awaited, has arrived!
These buds proclaim it so, without a doubt.
Another year these fruit trees have survived
to spread their charm and fragrances about.

What lovely sentinels of pure delight!
A Crabapple in bloom is quite a sight.


     3. A Spenserian Sonnet -- Disbursal

A Crabapple in bloom is quite a sight.
Its buds explode in beautiful arrays,
where whorls and swirls of elegance unite,
creating lovely, natural bouquets
upon a tree in colorful displays
of floral patterns, like a garden show.
They flutter in the breeze on windy days,
and ripple like the waves that come and go.
But then, the stronger winds begin to blow
and loosen flower's grip from writhing tops.
Soon crimson petals fall to earth like snow.
Upon a rose strewn trail each flower drops.
          Such wonders in the yards and forests loom.
          What sheer delights blaze, when Crabapples bloom,




 

Author Notes Anemoi - Greek gods of the winds
Boreas - Greek god of the north winds, bringer of winter.
Gaia - Greek goddess of the earth, Mother Earth
Zephyr -Greek god of the west wind, bringer of spring.
Azure - a shade of blue
Claret - a shade of red
Carnelian - a shade of red
Crimson - a shade of red
Ruby - a shade of red
Whorls - circular ridges

When the fruit trees bloom with flowers in the spring, delightful color returns to the world. After a drab winter, it is a pure delight to behold. I tried in the first Sonnet to convey a battle of the winds to gain the charm over Mother Earth as the Greeks describe it in their mythology.

This poem is a Tiara of Sonnets.
Fellow Fanstorian, I Am Cat came up with this brilliant concept and should be commended for it.
It is based on the concept of the Crown of Sonnets, which has a sequence of seven Sonnets, interlinked by last-to-first lines, and concluding with the final line being the same as the first line of the first Sonnet. Thus creating a circle that is the Crown. The Tiara of Sonnets, then, has the same concept, but with only three Sonnets. Thus a much smaller Tiara, rather than a Crown.

For this Tiara, since there are three primary Sonnet formats (the Petrarchan, the English, and the Spensarian), I thought I'd write one segment in each format here, but that is not a requirement.

Hope you enjoy it.

This photograph was taken by the author himself on April 29, 2016.


Chapter 405
Lovely Spring Lilacs

By Treischel




Small petals grouped within exquisite blooms
Blooms batched on stems that look like pom-pom plumes

Plumes sweetly painted in profuse pastels
Pastels, the shades of which the mind compels

Compels to dream of lovely things
Things helping souls relax
Relax as beauty is released
Released, the buds react

React to any seasonal decrees
Decrees that stimulate the honey bees

Bees drawn to shrubs of lovely lavender
Lavender that the lilac fans prefer

Prefer along with sweet perfume
Perfume aromas air
Air where the lilac scents can loom
Loom wafting everywhere

Everywhere, there are purple clusters seen
Seen and smelled among springtime's newest green

Green yards and forests team with newborn life
Life crowned by all the plants and rich wildlife.


Author Notes In keeping with my Spring motif, one cannot forget the Lilacs that bloom. I love their luxurious blooms, and their fragrance is pure delight. It is too bad they only last about a week and then are gone, but I enjoy them while they are here. Afterwards, it's just a green leafy bush.

Lilac (Syringa) is a species of flowering woody plants in the olive family (Oleaceae). The genus name Syringa is derived from Greek syrinx, meaning a hollow tube or pipe, and refers to the broad pith in the shoots in some species, easily hollowed out since ancient times to make reed pipes and flutes. Lilacs are often considered to symbolize love. In Greece, Lebanon, and Cyprus, the lilac is strongly associated with Easter time because it flowers around that time; it is consequently called paschalia. Source: Wikipedia.

This is a Loop Poem with Couplet option.
Loop Poetry is a poetry form created by Hellon, which is defined on the site Shadow Poetry. There are no restrictions on the number of stanzas nor on the syllable count for each line. In each stanza, the last word of the first line becomes the first word of line two, last word of line 2 becomes the first word of line 3, last word of line 3 becomes the first word of line 4. This is followed for each stanza. The rhyme scheme is abcb.

Variations:
1. Stanzas, writers choice on the number, no rhyming, the last word, first word scheme is maintained.

2. One long stanza, no limit on number of lines, no rhyming scheme, the last word, first word scheme is maintained.

3. Couplets mixed with 4 line stanzas, the last word, first word scheme is maintained in the stanzas. It can also be used in the couplets. Rhyme scheme is ab, cc, defg, hh, ii, jklm, nn, oo.

I chose the third option here. I used mostly iambic lines here, but due to repeated end words containing more than two syllables (like lavender), it is not possible to be completely ambic. My rhyme scheme is:
aa bb cdcd ee ff ghih jj kk.
The syllable count is:
10,10 -10,10 - 8,6,8,6 - 10,10 - 10,10 - 8,6,8,6 - 10,10 - 10,10.

This photograph was taken by the author himself on May 12, 2016


Chapter 406
As Sun Sets on the Bay

By Treischel




It doesn't matter where you are,
Or if you traveled near or far.
The wonder's never out of reach
At a sunset Beach
With a falling Star.

For sunsets paint a colored sky,
To please the eye of you and I,
In hues that seem to amplify,
As quiet minutes pass.
Forget the hourglass!

To be immersed in blazing bliss,
As tinges touch the sky like this --
A skyline shared, an evening kiss.
We watched it slip away.
Fit end to such a day.

Author Notes Another sunset on Lake Bronson State Park beach complete with a falling star. I took another Photograph of the same sunset after the sun was completely down and the sky had turned pink and wrote a different poem for it. I wrote this poem for this sky and called the other one The Creator's colors.

This poem is written in Quintrains.
A Quintrain is a five line poem of any rhyme, or meter.They can also be called Cinquans, but those have a specific syllable count layout.
For this one, the rhyme scheme is:
aabba cccdd eeeff.
The syllable count is:
8,8,8,5,5 - 8,8,8,6,6- 8,8,8,6,6.

This photograph is the reason that this poem exists, it moved my Muse to express what I saw in verse. The photograph was taken by the author himself in September, 2012.


Chapter 407
White Reflections

By Treischel



All things are simple, where I often stand,
in shallow water, looking all about,
as long legs balance talons in the sand.

I crane my lanky neck, and strain my eyes,
to spy a tasty morsel hid nearby.
Then, when I do, they'll get a big surprise,
as lightning quick, a jav'lin thrust applies.

Now, I don't claim to be too mean or neat,
but Giant Egrets, like me, need to eat.
So, I'll eat frogs and fish, or anything
with meat, that all my foraging may bring.
I'll stalk the shores until the day's complete.

I have the whitest feathers in this pond.
So tall and stately, I attract the girls.
Then when I spread my wings, they take command,
as all my feathered muscles then respond.
They lift me as my majesty unfurls
the biggest, baddest bird in this great land.


Author Notes This bird is a Great White Egret. I shot this photo two days ago, then thought, "This needs a poem."
Yes, I did intend a play on "reflections" in the Title.
Yes, I know its in the Herron family, not the Crane, but I couldn't resist that line about its neck.
The Great White Egret (Ardea alba), is also known as the Common Egret, Large Egret or Great White Heron. The scientific name comes from Latin ardea "heron", and alba, "white." It is a large heron with all-white plumage. Standing up to 1 m (3.3 ft) tall, this species can measure 80 to 104 cm (31 to 41 in) in length and have a wingspan of 131 to 170 cm (52 to 67 in). Apart from size, the great egret can be distinguished from other white egrets by its yellow bill and black legs and feet. It has a slow flight, with its neck retracted. This is characteristic of herons and bitterns, and distinguishes them from storks, cranes, ibises, and spoonbills, which extend their necks in flight. In North America, large numbers of great egrets were killed around the end of the 19th century so that their plumes could be used to decorate hats. Numbers have since recovered as a result of conservation measures.

This is a Progresso Quattro.
Progresso Quattro - Created by H. R. Jones - 4 progressive stanzas in iambic Pentameter, comprising of a Tercet, Quatrain, Quintain, and a Sestet in that order. 18 lines in length.
Rhyme scheme is optional, but at least one of the rhyme sounds from the Tercet must appear in the sestet.
Each of the stanzas builds on the theme of the Tercet.
It is similar to a Italian Heroic Sonnet with 18 lines. The Italian Sonnets do not have ending couplets. The difference between the Progresso Quattro is that the Heroic Italian Sonnet, is broken into 3 or 5 parts, and the Progresso Quattro is broken into 4 parts.
For this poem, I modified the Quintain's rhyme scheme to, eeffe, and picked up the "a" rhtyme from the tercet and included it in the sestet, as: ghgagha.
So, the poem's total rhyme scheme is:
aba cdcd eeffe ghagha.

This photograph was taken by the author himself in Battle Creek Park of Maplewood, Minnesota, on May 12, 2016.


Chapter 408
Sacrosanct

By Treischel




A solid Symbol,
cross
Aloft, 
in stones and con
Crete affirmation.
  A cathed
Ral dome
hung high
Over town
invite
S us
to come forth
And worship,
  bow dow
N to pray
 in here, where
Christ the Lord
    has been represen
Ted in architecture.
 

Author Notes Sacrosanct - holy, sacred

This is a picture of the Cathedral of St. Paul in St. Paul, Minnesota. It is my church. When they replaced the copper dome with a new one, they put a time capsule in the new cross on the roof. My name and my wife's signatures are in that cross.

This poem is a Joy Acrostic.
'Joy's Acrostic Variation', was invented by our own, Joy Graham. The rules are: A main word or phrase must be evident down the page in a centered fashion. You may waver the main word or phrase in a shape poetry style, but it must be readable.
She recommends using a larger font and different color just for the main word or phrase so it stands out. Your lines may be spaced across the main word or phrase, using each letter in your lines like an acrostic. It is up to the poet if they want to use rhymes or meter or not.

This picture was taken by the author himself on Ictober 20, 2012.


Chapter 409
senryu (love)

By Treischel


love floats over air
busy street filled with such hope
city bus or church


Chapter 410
Sing, Song Sparrow!

By Treischel




Sing to me, song sparrow!
Please, sing a song to me.
That twig is long and narrow
on barren bough of tree.

Sing, sing sing, as I walk on by, oh bird!
Sweet, sweet, sweet, is the tweet, tweet, tweet, I heard.

Such a tiny creature,
has such a mighty voice.
Today my music teacher,
sits on branch of choice.

Sing, sing sing, as I walk on by, oh bird!
Sweet, sweet, sweet, is the tweet, tweet, tweet, I heard.

Song sparrow, you bring joy,
to gild a sunny day
with the sounds that you employ,
and golden tone display.

Sing, sing sing, as I walk on by, oh bird!
Sweet, sweet, sweet, is the tweet, tweet, tweet, I heard.



Author Notes This little Song Sparrow was sitting on a nearby branch, as I was out walking along Lake Phalen with my wife, the other afternoon. He was singing away to us a private concert. No fear was shown, as we approached and listened for several minutes. Then, he took a little bow and turned around to face away from us, as if to say, "Thank you, I done." Of course, I had to write about him.

This poem is written in abab quatrains, with coupled repeating refrain. The syllable count for each quatrain/couplet set is: 6,6,7,6-10,10. The first two quatrains differ in meters in each. Line 1 is trochaic. Line 2 is iambic. Line 3 is feminine iambic. Line 4 reverts to iambic. The couplet is Spondaic. However, the third quatrain is all iambic trimeter.

This photograph was taken by the author himself on June 28, 2016.


Chapter 411
White Wonder

By Treischel




In takeoff,
white feathers give liftoff,
as Egret gets airborne from log trough.
I wonder,
just where it might wander,
in search of a nourishing dinner.

White avian king of the shoreline,
white hunter,
long-legged brine stalker, to fine dine,
you hover,
as instinct has wrought your design lines
forever.

With long beak for spearing
the morsels that show while you're peering
through waters for tidbits that flourish in shallows,
Like crayfish, or minnows, in wallows,
that bird feet are rearing
from hollows.

In instants,
you lift to the heavens.
Wherever your destiny beckons.


Author Notes I captured this Great White Egret in my camera lens, just as it was taking off, the other day while out walking at Battle Creek Park in Maplewood, Minnesota. It was in a pond at the leashless dogpark. I saw a German Shephard heading for it, and knew it would take off. So, I had my camera ready. Here is the shot I took, and the poem it inspired.

This poem is written in Amphibrach Meter.
An Amphibrach is a metrical foot used in Latin and Greek prosody that contains 3 syllables, rather than the usual 2. It consists of a long syllable between two short syllables. The word comes from the Greek, "short on both sides". Some books by Dr. Seuss contain many lines written in Amphibrachs, such as these from "If I Ran the Circus" (I added the capital letters to show the meter):

All READy / to PUT up / the TENTS for / my CIRcus.
I THINK I / will CALL it / the CIRcus / McGURKus.
And NOW comes / an ACT of / eNORmous /eNORmance!
No FORmer / perFORmer's / perFORMed this / perFORMance!

Because of the 3 syllable meter, Amphibrachs require a line length divisible by 3. So I thought it only logical for me to echo this, with stanzas divisible by three also. I wrote it in three Sestets (6 Line Stanzas) and a Tercet (3 Line Envoi).

I played accordingly with the line syllable count too. The poems lines are laid out with syllable counts as follows:

Stanza 1: 3,6,9,3,6,9
Stanza 2: 9,3,9,3,9,3
Stanza 3: 6,9,12,9,6,3
Envoi: 3,6,9

Sort of a Festival of threes.

This photograph was taken by the authoir himself on May 29, 2016.


Chapter 412
Hope for a Day

By Treischel

 
 
 
 

Sometimes
a bitter wind blows in.
 
Then the chill
touches to the bone.
 
Mind-numbing atrophy of mood
succumbs to a sense of
overwhelming
ill.
 
On the threshold of depression
lies the juncture
of the journey
leading many ways to
oblivion
or
redemption.
 
You grope in the darkness
for the light at the surface,
weighed down
in soggy surliness
and wanton worry,
wanting to give up --
to rest,
to stop the battle.
 
But there’s a spark
of
surviving spunk
still left.
 
It reaches for the hope,
a rope
to pull you out.
 
If it’s there,
you survive
another day.
 
Pray
that it’s there.
 
HOPE!
 
 

 

Author Notes Just a poem. No picture.

Thank you for reading my work


Chapter 413
A Vulture's Lot

By Treischel



His cloak of darkest feathers dramatize
a charnel aspect, that seeks out the dead,
through Vulture's hellish keen red sunken eyes,
on skeletal formed feather-naked head.

A Vulture's lot.

He'll sit up high, observing life all day,
for any mishaps of a fatal sort,
or soar like Eagle's famous flight forte
in circular carrion searching sport.

As oft' as not.

With beak attuned to death and all decay,
He'll keep the landscape clean of gross debris.
His countenance presents a foul display.
Without his nature, where would we soon be?

In stinkin' rot.

 

Author Notes Along the Mississippi River, high up on a electrical powerline tower, I spotted a large group of Vultures roosting up there. They are large, and in flight, are often mistaken for Eagles, due to the way they soar. I captured this image of one, although the sun was directly behind it, making most shots a silhouette. They are ugly up close. Their naked heads almost look like skulls. But they do perform a valuable service in nature, as the clean up crew.

I called this format a Cat-a-strophe.
A Cat-a- astrrophe, as first reviewed in I Am Cat's lovely poem titled, "In Martha's Vineyard", (July 4th, 2016). It is a play on the word "catastrophe". Of course Cat because the from was created by our own Catherine Ginn. A "Strophe" is actually a poetic term that is also know as a "Volta" or turn. The format consists of any number of Quatrains, followed by a single line, which is written in iambic pentameter. It is written with a rhyme scheme of:
abab, c, dede, c, fgfg, c, hihi, c (and so on).
After each quatrain is a four syllable line which rhymes with all the other single lines (c rhyme).
I dubbed the style of this poem, a 'Cat-a-strophe', however the creator herself has not acknowledged nor endorsed the name. Any negative feedback concerning the name should be directed at me, not her. Dean Kuch dubbed this form a "Cat-o-tronic. I quess Cat will decide.

This photograph was taken by the author himself on July 2, 2016.


Chapter 414
Water Lovers

By Treischel




The Land of Lakes and bluest waters,
We often totter on.
We have become Jet Boat and Yachters,
where daughter's dreams belong.
          For water-love clings to our souls,
          at fav'rite parks and water holes,
          on motorcraft with speed controls,
with kids it trolls along.

There is a thrill to flinging spume,
so high they loom o'er waves,
creating such a soggy plume,
for whom there's joyful raves.
          So, gather up your bathing suits.
          Make sure life-jacket constitutes
          your water playtime attributes,
and all recruits behave.

For then there's fun for everyone
on summer's sunny days.
The kind that just can't be outdone,
begun in careful ways.
          This type of sport is waterborne,
          and here, it is a trait inborn,
          to seek a creek from early morn,
to moist reborn mores.


 

Author Notes I was walking the trail along the Mississippi River just below the Hastings Bridge where I watched the locals cavorting in the river, inspiring this picture and poem. I mentioned safety here, because the couple in the speed boat is not wearing life-jackets. That is legal in Minnesota, as long as the jackets of flotation devices are present in the boat and readily accessible. Not even counting rivers and streams, Minnesota is famous for its 10,000 Lakes (actually 11,842). With 183,326 Miles of shoreline between its rivers and lakes, Minnesota boosts more shoreline than California, Hawaii, and Florida combined. So, the love of water is in our DNA. Here's the chart:

California, Hawaii, and Florida Shoreline vs. Minnesota Shoreline, including Rivers
OCEAN LAKES RIVERS TOTAL
California 3,427 32,050 59,328 94,805
Hawaii 1,052 229 20,160 21,441
Florida 8,436 22,236 22,000 52,672
CA + HI + FL 12,915 54,515 101,488 168,918
Minnesota 0 44,926 138,400 183,326
(Note: I couldn't make the columns line up prpperly in the editor, but each line has 4 numbers. The first is ocean shoreline, then lake shore, then river, and finally the total. For example, Minnesota has 0 oceanfront, and Hawaii has only 229 lakeshore.)

"Minnesota" is from the Dakota Indian language meaning "The Land of the Lakes", thus my capitalization in the first line.

Troll, refers to the practice of pulling bait or inflatables behind a boat.
Recruits means boat guests and children.
Creek - for purpose of the poem, I merely intend any body of water, rather than a literal creek.
Mores (pronouncesd Mor-rays) are customs or conventions that embody the fundamental values of a group. In this case, water Lovers.

See contest rules for format. I did use feminine iambic meter on line 1 and 3 of the poem.

This photograph was taken by the author himself on June 24, 2016.


Chapter 415
Horse Race

By Treischel



The jockeys in their silks, astride on prancing hooves,
will saunter to the starting gate, anticipating break-neck moves.
Now, if they hesitate, attendants head them in,
as cacophony rules -- the snorts, the neighs, the din,
the smell of jockey sweat, and horse's lather too,
combining in the air, sets of stress is running through.
As muscles tense, anticipate, the moment gates are freed.
Pray they break with speed, and take control of thrusting steed!
There's the bell, as the gates swing wide, erupting instant hell.
While horses launch, all the jockeys punch, heels to haunch, as well.

Hear the beat of the pounding feet
For victory, or sad defeat.

As they beak to the rail, hear those horse hooves thud,
horse's bodies bumping, their shod feet tossing mud,
They stretch for the stride of the winning rate.
Seeking out that gait, so they won't be late, for this race's fate.
Now jockeys give the horse its head, to weave through every row
while the leaders ebb and flow, as around the track they go.
Now break from the pack, get that front spot back.
Take that lead you lack, as you own the track.
For here they come, in the final turn, as the crowd lets out a roar
As he stretches for that finish line, colors flashing, spirits soar.

Hear the beat of the pounding feet
For victory, or sad defeat.

Hear the beat, pounding feet.
Yes, hear the beat of pounding feet!
Victory, oh, Victory!
Fly to victory!

Author Notes Thoughts that came as I was at the races in Canterbury Downs, in Shakopee, Minnesota. I love to watch the horse races. It is fun to bet. Although I maintain a strict budget, or gambling can get out of hand.

On the south bank bend of the Minnesota River, Shakopee and nearby suburbs comprise the southwest portion of Minneapolis-Saint Paul, the sixteenth largest metropolitan area in the United States with 3.3 million people. The river bank's Shakopee Historic District contains burial mounds built by prehistoric cultures. In the 17th century, Chief Shakopee of the Mdewakanton Dakota established his village on the east end. Shakopee acquired his name when his wife, White Buffalo Woman, gave birth to sextuplet boys. Shakopee means "the six." The city is known today for the Valleyfair amusement park and the Canterbury Park Racetrack. The Native Americans own a part interest in the racetrack , as well as fully own the nearby Mystic Lake Casino.

This poem is a Tambour.
The Tambour was created by Fanstorian RGstar. A Tambor is a very complex format that uses rhyme and different types of lines to provide pace and rhythm.
''Tambour'' = French for drum.

The reason for the title is the fact that the rhythm of the parade drum is incorporated in the poem. If one can visualize a parade walking by and the sound of the drums as they march through. The poetry is set to mimic the sound and roll of the drums.
It uses 3 line types to gain this effect.
1) 'PACE' LINE= offers speed and an injection of emotion, intense or soft.
2) 'COMMAND' LINE = directs an order or a wish for a special action, strong or soft.
3) 'DRUM ROLL' LINE = creates that special rhythm in answer or in influence to the line before.
As far as I could surmise, these three aspects occur within the 10 line stanzas.

These are fundamental to the ''Tambour'' and without using them it is nearly impossible to create it.
The basic form has three different stanza types. The first has ten long lines containing in-line rhyming on most (but not all) lines, and aabb end-line rhyming , followed by short rhyming couplets, until the last stanza, which has 4 lines that echo the earlier couplets.
Pace lines and the short syllable (Command lines) break up the rhythm of your base, or normal, lines .. followed directly by a long syllable ( Drum roll line) in answer to it or influenced by it. Without these , the Tambour would not be a Tambour.

The PACE lines throughout the poem are very important, because not only do they offer a break of rhythm, but what they contain or what they say are equally as important as syllables and rhythms they make.

There is no fixed meter, just the drum beats and rolls.
So here is an attempt at one. I hope I got it right.

This photograph was taken by the author himself on August 13, 2013.


Chapter 416
Cycle of the Day

By Treischel



Oh, to greet the blissful morning,
the kiss of dawn.
Birdsong brings a sweet forewarning.
With night sweats gone,
we feel the promise of a day,
to be refreshed in every way.
Our whole stirring spirit yearning,
the kiss of dawn.

But soon, with comfort of the night's
caress of dusk,
As we watch the waning twilights,
seeing stardust,
the colors dance around us. Then,
they will fade into darkness, when
we lay down worries to entrust
caress of dusk.

And so the cycle goes
from dusk to dawn.
The world will carry on.
Decrees impose
the rules of night and day.
Pray, it won't go away.


Author Notes Just some simple thoughts on the morning to evening cycle of a day.

This poem is a Pindaric Ode.
A Pindaric Ode is a ceremonious poem in the manner of Pindar, a Greek professional lyrist of the 5th century bc. Pindar employed the triadic structure (meaning three parts) attributed to Stesichorus (7th and 6th centuries bc), consisting of a Strophe (two or more lines repeated as a unit) followed by a metrically harmonious Antistrophe, concluding with summary lines (called an Epode) in a different meter. These three parts corresponded to the movement of the chorus to one side of the stage, then to the other, and their pause midstage to deliver the Epode.

Here I have the Strophe as Dawn, the Antistrophe as Dusk, and Epode as the conclusion. I characterized the mood of the Strophe as a kiss, while the Antistrophe is a hug. The conclusion is, that they repeat a cycle that goes on according to the rules of the universe.

Note: I used for the Strophe and Antistrope, a structure of an Octive (8 lines) and meter of: 8-4-8-4-8-8-8-4. For the Epode, I went with a Sestet and a meter of: 6-4-6-4-6-6. I did change the rhyme scheme slightly between the Strophe and the Antistrophe. So the total rhyme scheme is:
ababccab cdcdeedd fggfhh.

This photograph was taken by the author himself on May 19, 2013.


Chapter 417
The Bridge to Pike Island

By Treischel



While wandering in forest glen
along the river shore,
I found a lonely concrete bridge,
I hadn't seen before.

It bridged the Mississippi flats
that led to misty isle.
Beyond it was a weathered plaque,
that's been there for a while.

It stated Pike had landed here
the year, 1805.
He bought some land from local chiefs,
where now Twin Cities thrive.

So Minneapolis, St. Paul,
had infancy begun,
on Lou'sianna Purchase trip,
once led by Zebulon.

The Island is a park preserve,
the furthest north Pike got.
Along this Mississippi route
is plaque, so not forgot.

Now Pike moved on to greater fame,
as what he's known for best,
is finding Colorado peak
when he went further west.

Author Notes Pike's Island is an island located at the confluence of the Mississippi and Minnesota Rivers, just below the cliffs that hold Fort Snelling. The area is now a part of Fort Snelling State Park. It is very close to the Minneapolis/St. Paul International Airport. In fact, the planes land and take off right over it. But not many people know that the land, that later became part of both cities, was actually purchased by Zebulon Pike from the Dakota Indian leaders, while on his famous trip to explore the Louisianna Purchase territory, just after the Lewis and Clark Expedition. Starting at St. Loius, he traveled up the Mississippi River as far as St. Anthony Falls, then camped on this island. This was as far north up the river he traveled. After this, the team went back down the river and up the Missouri River. Pikes Peak in Colorado is named after him.

This poem is written in abcb rhymed quatrains with an 8-6 meter. This format is typically called the ballad format.

These photographs were taken by the author himself on May 1, 2016.


Chapter 418
Trash Testament

By Treischel



At times, created artwork mimics life,
As here, with this collected river trash,
Now sculpted into simple junk wildlife.

Materials along the waterways
Were gathered by environmental fans,
As trash is such an eyesore when it stays.
Who wants to see such things as tossed beer cans?

A clever sculptor put them to good use,
Creating art from all that gross refuse.
By welding and assembling them in style,
A creature from what was a garbage pile
Is shaped to heal environment's abuse.

From trapping and fur trading, they arose --
The beavers, that survived extinction's strife.
Now dams and ponds supporting birds are rife.
Oh, what a symbol that the artist chose!
Now this trash testament to beavers shows,
At times, created artwork mimics life.

Author Notes This is a piece of artwork that was created by an artist out of items collected from the river. It is located in Fort Snelling State Park, in Minnesota, along the river bottoms of the Mississippi River. It is a sculpture of a beaver. The beaver is a river dwelling mammal that was nearly driven to extinction by trappers and fur traders. Its dams create ponds that are positive environments for waterfowl.

This poem is a Progresso Quattro.
The Progresso Quatro is a format that was created by our very own Fanstorian, Just2Write (Aka: H. R. Jones). It consists of 4 progressive stanzas (thus Progresso) in iambic Pentameter, consisting of four different formats - a Tercet, Quatrain, Quintain, and a Sestet, in that order (thus Quattro). 18 lines in length.
Rhyme scheme is optional, but at least one of the rhyme sounds from the Tercet must appear in the sestet.
Each of the stanzas builds on the theme of the Tercet.
It is similar to a Italian Heroic Sonnet (thus the Italian flavor of the format's name) with 18 lines. The difference between the Progresso Quattro is, that the Heroic Italian Sonnet, is broken into 3 or 5 parts, and the Progresso Quattro is broken into 4 parts.

For this poem, I used a rhyme scheme, and set the Quintain's rhyme scheme to, eeffe, and picked up the "a" rhyme from the Tercet to include it in the Sestet, as: gaagga.
So, the poem's total rhyme scheme is:
aba cdcd eeffe gaagga.

This photograph was taken by the author himself on My 1, 2016.


Chapter 419
Angles of Diversity

By Treischel




Amazing arrays of birds of a feather,
that exist in diverse bird societies,
provide great surprise, as they flock together.

Assembled are avian varieties
with unique characteristic distinctions
that exist in diverse bird societies.

There seems to be no true outer restrictions
on size, color, or shape, that we often see
with unique characteristic distinctions.

As the angle of observation may be
the main factor that changes our perspective
on size, color, or shape, that we often see.

For factors in place are fairly reflective
that play tricks on our imperfect human eyes --
the main factor that changes our perspective.

That's what makes nature so hard to analyze.
Amazing arrays of birds of a feather,
that play tricks on our imperfect human eyes,
provide great surprise, as they flock together.

For this little guy,
who captured my eye,
was not what I thought,
as he pranced about.
So here is a quiz?
You know what it is?


Author Notes What this poem is expressing is, how hard it is at times to identify birds. Some, like this one, look different from different angles that you view them at. When I spotted this little guy, I thought it was a Roadrunner, but they don't come to Minnesota. As you can see from the front, he is pretty thin. The key is in his profile. Do you know what he is? He's a Green Heron. I wouldn't have guessed that at first. These four photos were taken by me of the same bird at the same time, as he moved around.

This poem is a Terzanelle with a Septet Envoi.
The Terzanelle is a poetry type which is a combination of the Villanelle and the Terza Rima forms. It's what you get when you mix two super popular Italian poetic forms. It is a 19-line poem consisting of five interlocking Triplets/Tercets plus a concluding Quatrain in which the first and third lines of the first Tercet appear as refrains. The middle line of each Tercet is repeated, reappearing as the last line of the succeedingTercet with the exception of the center line of the next-to-the-last stanza which appears in the Quatrain. The rhyme and refrain scheme for the triplets is as follows:

1. A1
2. B
3. A2

4. b
5. C
6. B

7. c
8. D
9. C

10. d
11. E
12. D

13. e
14. F
15. E

Ending Type 1:

16. f
17. A1
18. F
19. A2

Ending Type 2:

16. f
17. F
18. A1
19. A2

Each line of the poem should be the same metrical length. The traditional stance on the Terzanelle is that the lines should be written in a consistent iambic meter, but there are plenty of contemporary Terzanelles that just aspire to keep the lines a consistent length throughout.

So for this Terzanelle, I chose ending Type 1, and threw out iambic meter to use an unusual mixed meter of a consistent 11 syllables. I also added an Envoi made up of a Sestet 5 syllables per line, and a rhyme scheme of aabbcc.

These photographs were taken by the author himself on July 30, 2016 at Lake Elmo Park Reserve.


Chapter 420
Today's Politics

By Treischel

Donald J Trump,
Is often quite a grump.
Political correctness he disdains.
He won't suffer fools with no brains.


Hillary Clinton,
Opponents are hintin',
Cannot be trusted to play by the rules,
When it comes to securing her internet tools.


Author Notes Just some political observations based on convention viewing.

This poem is a Clerihew.
A Clerihew is a comic verse consisting of two couplets and a specific rhyming scheme, aabb invented by Edmund Clerihew Bentley (1875-1956) at the age of 16. The poem is about/deals with a person/character within the first rhyme. In most cases, the first line names a person, and the second line ends with something that rhymes with the name of the person. The last two couplets usually contain a humorous or satirical statement. No meter requirement.

This picture from two Yahoo images.


Chapter 421
The Gathering Clouds

By Treischel




The gathering clouds, portending doom,
convey bright daylight to gloom.
Shadows darkly loom.
Day resumes
NIGHT.

Enveloped, darkness that now entombs,
kills colors our eyes consume.
Shadows darkly loom.
Day resumes
FRIGHT.

As the downpour gushes flooding spume,
all dire straits, we assume.
Shadows darkly loom.
Day resumes
PLIGHT


Author Notes Some parts of the country, including here in Minnesota, have been deluged recently in floods, due to incredible cloudbursts. Last week, St. Cloud and surrounding areas got hit with 8 inches of rain, high winds, and lightning. Only to be hit again within 2 hours with another large storm. This poem attempts to capture the thoughts as those people in the area see the clouds gather again.

This poem is a Triquint.
A Triquint is a poem form created by Sylvia A. Feeley, which consists of 3 stanzas of 5 lines each. Where Lines 3 and 4 of the first stanza becomes a Refrain that repeats in stanzas 2 and 3. The syllable count for each stanza is 9, 7, 5, 3, 1 and has a rhyme scheme of:

a,a,A1,A2,b,

where A1 and A2 are the repeated lines in each stanza.
Since the "a" rhyme carries through all three stanzas, it is very important to select the "a" rhyme wisely. Since the "b" rhyme is just a single syllable that must interplay with the repeated refrain, it makes this a very complex format to write.

I hope you enjoyed mine.

This photograph was taken by the author himself on July 8, 2016.


Chapter 422
Party Crasher

By Treischel



This chipmunk has an appetite.
His cuteness is a pure delight.
With chubby cheeks and eyes so bright,
his look is quite a pleasant sight.

He often steals the feeder's seed,
providing his survival creed.
Although, there is a touch of greed.
His takes exceed beyond his need.

I've noted that when he's around,
seeds disappearing by the pound.
The birds that come have often found
the mound of seeds does not abound.

He fills his cheeks, and then he'll dash
to find a hole to hoard his stash.
He must have made a massive cache.
He's so brash, that I'm abash,

that he can crash
my party.

Author Notes This is another photograph that my grandson, Jeremy, took with my camera, of a chipmunk eating bird seeds (saffron seed) off the railing of my back deck. This guy has been around for years, to the point that my grandson named him Nacho. He tends to take more than his fair share. I often chase him away so the birds can eat. He is cute though.

This poem is a Monotetra.
The Monotetra is a poetic form developed by Michael Walker. Each stanza contains four lines in mono-rhyme. Each line is in tetrameter (four metrical feet) for a total of eight syllables. What makes the Monotetra so powerful as a poetic form, is that the last line contains two repeated double rhymes. It can have as few as one or two stanzas, or as many as desired.

Stanza Structure:
Line 1: 8 syllables; a
Line 2: 8 syllables; a
Line 3: 8 syllables; a
Line 4: 4 syllables, a,a

This poem had 4 stanzasz, so the total rhyme scheme is:
a,a,a,(a,a) - b,b,b,(b,b) - c,c,c,(c,c) - d,d,d,(d,d).
I added a 2 line envoi.

This photo is one of the author's personal collection. It was taken July 10, 2016.


Chapter 423
Scenery Made, for Artists

By Treischel


I looked o'er the Stonebridge rail,
to see sights that might prevail.
To all my most astute vision,
suddenly a scene has risen,
of the people's recreation in the park,
before dark.
Scenery made, for artists.

Painting on museum walls,
with their decorated halls,
have the same chiaroscuro
as this scene, lighted here below,
with reflections, and the shadow's scattered light.
Quite a sight!
Scenery made, for artists.

A tempera look applies,
as if the hues comprise
gouache tinted greens and blues,
that fill the vision through and through.
Water ripples, that draw critic's eye again,
offer zen.
Scenery made, for artists.

Diagonal perspectives rage,
from left to right upon the stage.
Repousoir at lower left,
carries to the right, aloft,
past the people who are playing in the park.
What a lark!
Scenery made, for artists.

Feel the depth contained within,
from kayak, where views begin:
the water to the open plain,
where all the picnic tables reign,
to the building at the corner of the spread.
Which is red.
Scenery made, for artists.

Couldn't paint a better scene;
palette touched with blue and green,
tree reflected in the water,
kayak playing like an otter,
in a place, where all the images unite.
Such delight!
Scenery made, for artists.




Author Notes A photographer's image as being viewed by an art critic. This image was taken at Lake Phalen, as I peered over the railing of an old stone bridge in the park. I'm contemplating whether to put this image on canvas, and wondered what a critic might think. So I delved in to some terms I learned in my college Art Appreciation class. Here's the terms I used:

Chiaroscuro: Chi-a-ro-scu-ro (pronounced: key-a-row-skoo- row) is the contrasting use of light and shadow. artists who are famed for the use of chiaroscuro include Leonardo da Vinci, Caravaggio and Rembrandt. Leonardo used chiaroscuro to enhance the three-dimensionality of his figures.
Gouache: Gou-a-che (pronounced: goo-A-che) is opaque watercolor paint.
Repoussoir: Re-pous-so-ir (pronounced: ra-poo-so-ear) is a method of creating or enhancing depth perspective in a painting, for instance by placing a large figure/object in the foreground. Such repoussoir figures were common features of Dutch figure painting of the seventeenth-century. Dutch Realist landscape artists often exploited the dramatic effect of repoussoir to enliven their pictures of the flat and featureless Dutch countryside.
Pallette: Pal-lette (pronounced: pall-it)is a slab of wood, metal or glass used by the artist for mixing paint. Also: figuratively: the range of colors used by the artist.
Tempera: Tem-per-a (pronounced: tem-per-rah) is the technique of painting with pigments bound in a water-soluble emulsion, such as water and egg yolk, or an oil-in-water emulsion such as oil and a whole egg.
Zen: a variety of Buddhism, seeking to attain an intuitive illumination of mind and spirit, through meditation, usually in a quiet, peaceful setting.

This is a lyrical poem.
It is meant to by read to the meter of Simon and Garfunkel's famous song, The Sounds of Silence.
Syllable count: 7,7,8,8,11,3,7, with a mixed meter.
Rhyme scheme: aabbccR, where R represents the repeated refrain.

This photograph was taken by the author himself on July 17, 2016.


Chapter 424
Upon the Web

By Treischel



The silken threads are tossed on gentle breeze,
affixed where victim's desperate plight begins.
So thin, transparent, that one seldom sees
a woven grid that spider deftly spins --

the waiting web.

The spider clings with lithe and lethal legs,
on which it springs to capture those ensnared.
No matter how the vanquished victim begs,
once bitten, then, it soon becomes impaired.

Life forces ebb.

This patient predator's snagged prey are doomed,
with venom full of enzymes that dissolve.
A creature to vibrations fine attuned
to silken pathways, finds its world revolves

upon the web.



Author Notes I captured a photo of this spider near my house wall the other day. It is a common American Grass Spider. Its web didn't show up in the photo, but was definitely there. It was strung between the arms of my house's hose keeper wheel. This spider was on its web, but facing my house, so this is its underside.

Agelenopsis is a genus of spiders, known as American Grass Spiders. They weave sheet webs that have a funnel shelter on one edge. The web is not sticky, but these spiders make up for that shortcoming by running very rapidly. The larger specimens (depending on species) can get up to approximately 5.5 inches(19 mm) in body length. Their bite releases agatoxins that cause rapid paralysis in insect prey, though their venom is not medically significant to humans. Thank goodness. Source: Wikipedia.


This poem is a Cat-a-strophe poem.
I called this format a Cat-a-strophe.
A Cat-a- strophe, as first reviewed in I Am Cat's lovely poem titled, "In Martha's Vineyard", (July 4th, 2016). It is a play on the word "catastrophe". Of course "Cat" because the from was created by our own Catherine Ginn. A "Strophe" is actually a poetic term that is also known as a "Volta" or turn. The format consists of any number of Quatrains, followed by a single line, which is written in iambic pentameter. It is written with a rhyme scheme of:
abab, c, dede, c, fgfg, c, hihi, c (and so on).
After each quatrain is a four syllable line which rhymes with all the other single lines (c rhyme).
I dubbed the style of this poem, a 'Cat-a-strophe', however the creator herself has not acknowledged nor endorsed the name. Any negative feedback concerning the name should be directed at me, not her. Dean Kuch dubbed this form a "Cat-o-tonic. I guess Cat will decide.


Chapter 425
The Fear

By Treischel



"All we have to fear,
is fear itself!"

For what is fear,
but just anxious
expectations?
Well, POPPYCOCK!

We'll make our own realities.
Better or worse,
we cast our final vote.


Author Notes Of course the fear is - who will we choose as our next President? The famous quote is from Franklin Delano Roosevelt (FDR) during his address to congress after the bombing of Pearl Harbor.

This poem is a Sapphonic Triad
A Sapphonic Triad is a format created by our own Ciliverde, and named by Pantygynt. It consists of three parts (the triad) - a two line quotation (Free verse but max total of sixteen syllables - must be concise and memorable), followed by a quatrain of four lines each of four syllables, and finally an 8-4-6 syllable envoi that moves us on somewhere...it should have a "satori" feeling. It is called Sapphonic due to its similarity to the female, ancient Greek poet Sappho, who was famous for her clever, short poetic works.

This image is from Yahoo images.


Chapter 426
Revealed and Concealed

By Treischel




English Sonnet


          So, note the scenery as seasons flow.
          The density and depth wanes with the time,
          created as the leaves that come and go,
          when winter, summer, spring, and fall align.

          In summer, leaves are thick and colored green.
          They limit what pedestrians can see.
          The leaves leave little space left in between,
          while grass and bushes grow below each tree.

          When all the vivid vistas are concealed,
          the paths and byways tend to be compressed.
          The foliage hides the beauty, not revealed,
          because the blended shades have coalesced.

          In summer, sights arise around each bend,
          but summer yields the season in the end.



Petrarchan Sonnet


          But summer yields the season in the end,
          as fall puts pretty pigments on display
          in wondrous color canopy arrays
          that mix the foliage in artistic blends -
          the painted palette Nature's touch extends.
          Each hillside soon becomes a rich bouquet --
          the reds, resplendent treats in every way,
          while yellows, rusts, and green hues all contend.

          However, trees soon drop some early leaves.
          So sights, that once were hidden, now are seen,
          as woods reveal their secrets 'hind the screen -
          a tangled brush and opaque branch reprieve,
          revealing vistas hiker's eyes perceive
          as cold winds blow where winter's whims convene.



Spenserian Sonnet


          As cold winds blow where winter's whims convene,
          the leaves get stripped from twisted, woody limbs,
          to blanket paths of forested ravines.
          The coverings are dropped and color dims.
          The lack of leaves, leaves landscapes looking grim.
          Then, suddenly, the sky is filled with snow.
          The stillness soon creates a silent hymn,
          while woods become a crystal white tableau.
          Lament the lack of color, but don't go
          without appreciation of brisk air,
          and fresh flocked foliage flashing sunny glow,
          in winter wonderland beyond compare.
                    The snow provides a vast pearlescent hue.
                    As winter wanes, the green is overdue.


Rubiat Sonnet

          As winter wanes, the green is overdue.
          Then springtime rains come swiftly passing through.
          They wash the ground and set the season's turn,
           to bring the things that help the earth renew.

          The seeds and trees begin renewal's churn,
          producing leaves and buds, for which we yearn.
          Then, once more, colors dominate the scene,
          and we will celebrate their rich return.

          Yet there's a price to pay in growth's routine,
          when sights will yet again become unseen,
          as leaves and thickets tend to quickly grow
          into a dense and denigrating screen.

           It's all a part of nature's changing show.
          So, note the scenery as seasons flow.


 

Author Notes I frequently walk in my favorite park many time during the course of a year. Because I do, I notice how much the seasons affect the scenery as they change. Most notable is, that difference in the density of the forest. In summer, the leaves and brush conceal many things that only appear as you come around a bend. Things are very compressed. Then in fall, after the early leaves fall, you see deeper into the woods and more is revealed. Finally winter strips it all bare, and then covers it with snow. Spring starts it all over again. I tried to capture that here in this poem.

This poem has 4 interlinked Sonnet Formats - The English, Petrarchan, Spensarian, and Rubiat. Each is written in iambic pentameter. Each carries is own signature rhyme scheme, as follows:

English:.... abab cdcd efef gg
Petrarchan: abbaabba cddcdd
Spenserian: ababcbccdcd ee
Rubiat:....... aaba bbcb ccdc dd

This photograph was taken by the author himself, depicting the fall scenario, on October 22, 2016.


Chapter 427
Sniff Sneeze

By Treischel


Sneering soured to a grimace
Snarling set the facial premise
Sniffing caused a rude appearance
Snuffles made much interference
Snivels sent the message forward
Snout was full, and getting awkward
Snot had filled and aggravated

Sneeze could not be soon abated
Snatch a tissue, issue captured
Sneak a peek, ensuring rapture
Snidely smile and quickly discard
Snare tobacco pinch from its hoard
Snuff then lifted to proboscis
Snorted, generating stasis


Author Notes No, I don't use snuff, but it was a common practice in the 1700's to snort a small pinch up the nose. Snuff is a smokeless tobacco made from ground or pulverised tobacco leaves. It is insufflated or "snuffed" into the nasal cavity, delivering a swift hit of nicotine and a lasting flavored scent (especially if flavoring has been blended with the tobacco). Traditionally it is sniffed or inhaled lightly after a pinch of snuff is either placed onto the back surface of the hand, held pinched between thumb and index finger, or held by a specially made "snuffing" device. Snuff-taking by the Taino and Carib people of the Lesser Antilles was observed by the Franciscan monk Raman Pana on Columbus' second voyage to the New World in 1493. Friar Pana's return to Spain with snuff signaled its arrival in Europe that would last for centuries. In 1561 Jean Nicot, the French ambassador in Lisbon, Portugal, who described tobacco's medicinal properties as a panacea in his writings, is credited with introducing ground tobacco snuff to the Royal Court of Catherine de' Medici to treat her persistent headaches. She was so impressed with its curative relieving properties, she promptly declared that tobacco would henceforth be termed Herba Regina (Queens' Herb). Her royal seal of approval would help popularize snuff among the French nobility. Snuff use in England increased in popularity after the Great Plague of London (1665 - 1666) as people believed snuff had valuable antiseptic properties, which added a powerful impetus to its consumption. By 1650, snuff use had spread from France to England, Scotland, and Ireland, and throughout Europe, as well as Japan, China, and Africa. By the 18th century, snuff had become the tobacco product of choice among the elite. Snuff use reached a peak in England during the reign of Queen Anne. Prominent snuff users included Pope Benedict XIII who repealed the smoking ban set by Pope Urban VIII; King George III's wife Queen Charlotte, referred to as 'Snuffy Charlotte', who had an entire room at Windsor Castle devoted to her snuff stock; and King George IV, who had his own special blends and hoarded a stockpile of snuff. Napoleon, Lord Nelson, the Duke of Wellington, Marie Antoinette, Alexander Pope, Samuel Johnson and Benjamin Disraeli all used snuff, as well as numerous other notable persons. The taking of snuff helped to distinguish the elite members of society from the common populace, which generally smoked its tobacco. Source: Wikipedia.
Here I blended that practice, with just a basic sneeze.

This poem is derived from the common Pleiades.
A Pleiades is a poetry form created by Craig Tigerman, that has a title with a single word. The poem itself has seven lines. The first word in each line begins with the same letter as the title. The name is derived from mythology and history. The Pleiades were the seven daughters of Atlas, placed by Zeus among the stars in the constellation Taurus. Each daughter had a name starting with the same first letter. Then, in the 16th century there was a famous group of French Poets who formed a group called a Pleiade, who favored the use of classical forms.

What makes THIS a double Pleiades is, I doubled the lines to 14 (2x7) and doubled the title from one to two words. In addition, instead of starting each line with the same single letter, I started with the same first TWO letters. Making this a much harder feat to accomplish. After all, how hard is it to write 7 unrhymed lines with 7 words starting with the same single letter. In keeping with the French poets, I added some classical poetic techniques - coupled rhyming, alliteration, inline rhyme and meter. The meter is trochaic tetrameter. Hope you like my modifications.

This image is from Yahoo Images.


Chapter 428
Dusk at the Lakes

By Treischel




When you sit by the fire as the dusk settles in, it's so sweet!
As the twilights expire in the sky, it begins to accrete
into feelings, as those who have sat in the dusk can esteem,
that the moment embraces the essence that floats in a dream.
From the fire, to the bench at the beach, then the sky, it all drapes
on a scene where the stage is the night's blended shadowy shapes.
There's the sound of the fire as the wood crackles loud. Smoke escapes
on the breeze, as the warmth of the pine burning slow offers heat.
Let the marshmallows roast on the flames, 'til they brown in the steam.
You'll partake of it all. It's a ball, when you camp at the lakes!

in dusk at the lakes
logs crackle in burning fire
campers crave s'mores


Author Notes I am refering to a place where I recently camped, near the town of Detroit Lakes, Minnesota.

Accrete - to gather together
S'mores - short for SomeMores, a campfire treat created by placing a hot roasted marshmallow upon a plain chocolate Hershey Bar between two halves of a graham cracker.

This poem contains two poetic formats: a CinqTroisDecaLa and a Haiku.
A CinqTroisDecaLa takes its name from Cinq - meaning five in French; Trois - meaning three in French; and Decade meaning a grouping of 10. It is a form created by Laura Lamarca (La is her signature trademark), consisting of one 10-lined stanza. The rhyme scheme for this form is aabbcccabc and a syllable count of each line is 15. So CinqTrois is for 3 X 5 = 15 syllable count. Deca is for the 10 line stanza length. The meter is unspecified.

A Haiku has three lines. For a traditional haiku, the first line has 5 syllables. The second line has 7 syllables. The third line has 5 syllables again. The traditional Japanese haiku requires some reference to nature or the season. The goal of a haiku is to capture a single moment with very few words. It is unrhymed, contains no punctuation or capitalization. It has a line that contains a surprising "aha" statement that was unexpected.

A non-traditional haiku can have less than 17 syllables. A common variation is 3/5/3.

For the first poem, I considered the 15 syllable meter and decided that an anapestic meter would work well (da da Dum, da da Dum). I also thought that the combination of these two poetic forms would combine to give the feeling of a Haibun.

This photograph was taken by the author himself on October 1, 2016.


Chapter 429
Morning at Camp

By Treischel




Down by the lakeshore, early in the day,
the rising sun was burning fog away.
What was remaining, was a thinning mist.
Like tendrils, drifting smoke would slowly twist
in silent scene no poet can resist.

The morning coffee, brewing in the pot,
was wafting fragrance, getting nice and hot.
The perfect way to chase the morning chill.
I poured a cup, prepared to drink my fill.
Then found a bench, to gather in the still.

A Loon had landed, out upon the lake.
An eerie song proceeds to overtake
the silent setting, with its mournful call,
and yet its echo blended with it all,
to make that moment perfectly enthrall.

Within this instance, found profound release,
and drank my coffee in idyllic peace.


Author Notes Doesn't get much better than that. I took this picture last Sunday morning at Lake Carlos State Park in Minnesota, my Folger's Classic Roast well brewed, and serenaded by Loons.

This Poem is a Septillian Sonnet.
The Septillian Sonnet was created by fellow Fanstorian, Nancy E. Davis. It is an elongated version of the basic Sonnet format, having 17 lines versus the typical 14 lines. Nevertheless, it carries all the features and recognizable structures of a standard Sonnet, with: three stanzas followed by a closing couplet, iambic pentameter, and a Volta (but at line 11, rather than 9). The elongation is due to using Quintains (5 line stanzas) instead of Quatrains. The rhyme scheme is set at a strict aabbb scheme. The name is derived from the 17 lines Sept being 7 in French, and tillian being a play on "teen"). The total rhyme scheme is therefore:
aabbb ccddd eefff gg.

This photograph was taken by the author himself on October 2, 2016.


Chapter 430
Changes

By Treischel




If life has any certainty
that certainty is change
For what may seem eternal
may disappear someday
The scope of change amazes
when considering impact
The results are so surprising
as circumstances interact

Even civilizations aren't exempt
Ancient Egypt, Greece, and Rome
The Aztecs, Mayans too
They all came along and went
some for centuries
some thousands of years
But are there any members left
to shed some somber tears

The forces interacting
leave nothing known untouched
from beliefs, lifestyles, technology
it all blows in the dust
It also applies to businesses
where innovations are rife
Some will simply go away
I've seen it in my own life

I've seen the corporations
with their structure and their glass
being built, then torn down again
as ownerships can change
So even brick and mortar
aren't as permanent as one thinks
Few are found as permanent
as the Pyramids or the Sphinx

No occupation is guaranteed
though they often may seem so
Take the cases of the blacksmiths,
elevator attendants, keypunch operators,
nightclub cigarette girls
Just to name a few
their importance came and went
as changes passed on through

I watched the 50's vacuum tubes
replaced by small transistors
and then by microchips
While vinyl records went to 8 tracks
then to tape cassettes
Now CD disks create the squall
Can't imagine what might happen next
Wish I had a crystal ball

So if you sit back relaxing
with your investments all secure
and smug within your world
ignoring histories lessons
oblivious to change
better open up your eyes
the next one is surely coming
it could be a big surprise

Author Notes Anyone who has lived a while has been touched by change, and the speed and scope of it. I captured in the picture above a good example. In downtown Minneapolis, next to the modern Guthrie Theater, and with Luxury Condominiums all around, sits the Mill City Museum. It is the ruins of a once prominent stone edifice from the world's largest flour mill owned by Cadawallander C. Washburn, built in 1874 and destroyed by a flour explosion in 1879. The Mill industry, with General Mills and Pillsbury, had a large impact in building Minneapolis. The broken stone walls and huge millstones are there on display. In my own personal experience my company Unisys started the computer industry, became Serry Univac, Sperry Rand, Unisys, Paramax, Loral, and finally Lockheed Martin, who shut our site down and laid off the existing 2000 employees that once numbered 10,000 in the Twin Cities. The Ford Plant that made Ford Rangers, was closed and demolished. Northwest Airlines, formed in Minnesota was bought by Delta and the headquarters moved. Brick and mortar, even history meant nothing.

This poem is an A L'Arora Poem.
The A L'Arora, a form created by Laura Lamarca. The A L'Arora is named after her as "La" is her signature. "Aurora" is Italian and means "dawn" - "Arora" is derived from this. It consists of 8-lined stanzas. The rhyme scheme for this form is:
a, b, c, d, e, f, g, f,
with no syllable count per line. The minimum length for the poem is 4 stanzas with no maximum length stipulation. This format combines both the freedom of a Free Verse poem, but adds a tiny bit of structure by stipulating the number of lines, and fixing a rhyme pairing at lines 6 and 8 of each stanza. So you have a hybrid here of both Free Verse and structured rhyming verse.

This picture was taken by the author himself on February 20, 2016.


Chapter 431
My Style

By Treischel




I write poems about Nature.
Are you bored with me?
Well, who cares?

Most have rhyme and some structure.
Can I write Free Verse?
Don't you know?

My Muse involves photographs.
Do they also speak to you?
Don't you see?


Author Notes I originally classified this format under "Poetry for Dummies." As I wasn't particularly enamored with this type. It seemed pretty inane to me, and I avoided writing one. Especially with the example provided, which was:
I'm a very strong woman.
Are you a woman?
Are you strong?

I thought.
I just cannot believe it
So, that's poetry?
Are you Nuts?

Then I realized that the questions are the art. They can be very provocative. So here is
a set of them that I wrote.

This poem is a set of three Quinzaines.
A Quinzaine is a poem with three lines and a set syllable count. The English word Quinzaine come from the French word "Qunize", meaning fifteen. Thus, a Quinzaine is an unrhymed verse of fifteen syllables. where these syllables are distributed among the three lines so that there are seven syllables in the first line, five in the second line and three in the third line (7/5/3). The first line makes a statement. The next two lines ask a question relating to that statement.

Thanks for reading mine'

No picture required on this one.


Chapter 432
Pelican Perspectives

By Treischel





Alouette

          Pelicans preening.
          Some resting, dreaming,
          At home in their habitat.
          Long pocketed beaks
          By oceans or creeks
          Define what you're looking at.

          These white feathered beasts
          Scoop fishes for feasts,
          In aerial swoop or dive.
          The water will drain
          Through bills as a strain.
          A method by which they thrive.

Katauta (Alliterative)

          Clutches convening
          Clans continuously chat
          Big boisterous bureaucrats


 

Author Notes I spotted this colony of Pelicans at Carlos Avery Wildlife Management Area while out hunting (unsuccessfully) for a picture of a Sandhill Crane, known to inhabit this area. They were about 200 yards away, across a pond, so I had to use my telephoto lens, which didn't get them as clearly as I'd like. Pelicans are a genus of large water birds that makes up the family Pelecanidae. They are characterized by a long beak and a large throat pouch used for catching prey and draining water from the scooped up contents before swallowing. They frequent inland and coastal waters where they feed principally on fish, catching them at or near the water surface. They are gregarious birds, travelling in flocks, hunting cooperatively and breeding colonially. The birds have been persecuted because of their perceived competition with commercial and recreational fishing. They fish by beating their wings on the water surface and then scooping up the prey. They catch multiple small fish by expanding the throat pouch, which must be drained above the water surface before swallowing. This operation takes up to a minute, during which time other seabirds may steal the fish. Large fish are caught with its hooked bill-tip, then tossed up in the air to be caught and slid into the gullet head-first. A gull will sometimes stand on the pelican's head, peck it to distraction, and grab a fish from the open bill. Source: Wikipedia.

This poem consists of two formats - An Alouette and a Katauta. I combined them due their similar syllable counts, but wanted to juxtapose the French versus Japanese styles. I hope you can feel the difference.

The Alouette, created by Jan Turner, consists of two or more stanzas of 6 lines each, with the following set rules:

Meter: 5, 5, 7, 5, 5, 7
Rhyme Scheme: a, a, b, c, c, b.
Preference for the meter accent is on the third syllable of each line, but that is not a firm requirement, and I did not follow that here.

The Katauta is an unrhymed japanese form consisting of 17 or 19 syllables. The poem is a three-lined poem the following syllable counts: 5/7/7. It usually contains a typical Japanese "Aha" statement.

A single Katauta is considered a half-poem, however, a pair of Katautas using the syllable count of 5,7,7 is called a Sedoka.

Although not a typical Japanese convention, I made this one alliterative.

This photograph was taken by the author himself on September 18, 2016.


Chapter 433
A River, Bound

By Treischel

 
 
 
 
Minneapolis
is graced
with mighty river
and
a falls.
 

Allowing it
to be embraced
by many business
protocols.
 
The POWER of
St. Anthony Falls
 
lies
beneath
its terraced walls.
 
The pride
of Army Engineers
who built the many
concrete tiers.
 
Bridges
span its measured breath,
as
the mighty Mississippi
rolls
o’er the top
of turbined tines
to feed
the kilowatt controls.
 
The lock gates
can be opened
w-i-d-e,
to let
the riverboats inside
 
to lift,
                      or lower,
as the case,

determined by
the time and place.
 
A river,
bound
to meet man’s will.
 
Its dammed
to churn the flower mills.
 
                                    Its dammed
                                    for domesticity.
 
                                                                           Its dammed
                                                                           for electricity.
 
Through this city’s
 
heart
 
it leads.
 
A river,
bound
to meet man’s needs.
 
 
 
 
 

Author Notes This is the Lock and Dam at St. Anthony's Falls in downtown Minneapolis, Minnesota, as seen from the Arched Bridge. The natural falls were replaced by a concrete overflow spillway (also called an "apron") after it partially collapsed in 1869. In the 1860's, as Minneapolis developed, the water power at the falls became a source of power for several industries. Water power was used by sawmills, textile mills, and flour mills. From this area, such industries as Pillsbury and General Mills developed. Later, in the 1950s and 1960s, a series of locks and dams was constructed to extend navigation to points upstream on the Mississippi River.

This poem is a Faux Free Verse.
A Faux Free Verse is a poem that is loosely formatted like a Free Verse poem, but is actually rhymed and metered.

This picture was taken by the author himself on September 13, 2016.


Chapter 434
Winter Dreams of Lilacs

By Treischel




Snow lays heavy on grounds frozen.
Winter settles in once more.
Trees are barren. Plants now covered.
Thoughts of spring come to the fore.
Long to see the lilacs blooming --
fragrant flowers I adore
lavender clusterss, land gracing
with contrasting leaves of green.
Memories of which I'm dreaming,
interrupt a bleak routine.


Author Notes Winter can be beautiful as well as bleak. Thoughts of spring do creep in.

This poem is a Decannelle.
The Decannelle was created by Joseph Nutter and made popular in 1949 when it was published in a poetry magazine. The odd numbered lines have unrhymed feminine endings, while the even number lines have rhymed masculine endings.

The Decannelle is:
1. A decastich, a poem in 10 lines.
2. Metered in trochaic tetrameter with alternating 8-7-8-7-8-7-8-7-8-7 syllables causing the odd numbered lines to end with feminine end words, and the even lines having two end rhymes (a and b).
3. Rhymed. The rhyme scheme is: xaxaxaxbxb (with the x being the unrhymed line). Sort of a hop-scotch rhyming pattern of every other line.

This photograph was taken by the author himself last spring on May 12, 2016.


Chapter 435
Baffling Vision

By Treischel


Thought that I was dreaming here.
Saw a vision gleaming near.
What was this before my eyes?
Possibly a butterfly?
Origin is quite unknown,
tucked in byway, all alone.
Surely, it is made of stone.
Baffled by this scene surprise.
"Oh, I see it!" Cried aloud.
Water's surface has allowed
Arch reflection twice endowed.
Thought that I was dreaming here.
Saw a vision gleaming near.


Author Notes Late last fall I was out enjoying the seasons colors while walking along a lagoon at Lake Phalen in St. Paul, Minnesota. While crossing a footbridge I turned to look upstream and was confronted with this vision. At first I didn't know what it was. Then I realized that I was looking at the archway of the Frost Street Bridge reflected in the water, with tree branches obscuring the rest of the bridge. Luckily I had my camera with me. So, here's a poem describing that moment.

This poem is Boutonniere.
The Boutonniere seems to be an exercise in writing in catalectic trochaic meter. In other words, the stress comes first in each metric foot (trochee), but the last foot of the line, drops the last unstressed syllable (catalectic), so the poem starts and completes on a stressed syllable. Trochaic tetrameter would be described as a a series of stressed (S) and unstressed (u) syllables as follows: Su / Su/ Su/ Su (tetrameter, 8 syllables). Catalectic trochaic tetrameter would be Su/Su/Su/S (7 syllables). This format was created by Ann Byrnes Smith.

The Boutonniere is:
1. Written in 13 lines.
2. It is metered in catalectic trochaic tetrameter. Su/Su/Su/S.
3. Rhymed. The rhyme scheme is: A1,A2,bbcccbddd,A1,A2
4. Refrained, L1 is repeated as L12 and L2 is repeated as L13.
If you know me, you know I especially like the two sets of triple rhymes.

The picture was taken by the author himself on October 16, 2016.


Chapter 436
Winter Spell

By Treischel



When winter covers walks in layered snow,
there's still a track to show you where to go,
by following impressions in the snow,
on footprints that will wander to and fro.

That path may be a challenge for your feet.
You might engage another's booted feet,
that tracked a trail that people can repeat,
where you could even chance to take a seat.

Then oh, what winter wonders will be seen,
where white snow leaves a veil so crisp and clean.
Let's linger there to see what can be seen.

As shadows cast a spell in twilight glow,
the sparkles in the snow begin to glow,
like sprinkled dust the fairies might bestow.

Author Notes This was an un-shoveled path out on Harriet Island, in St. Paul, Minnesota, that follows the Mississippi River. Nonetheless, walkers were not deterred. I captured this image about an hour before sunset as the shadows were lengthening. The snow was sparkling. I tried to capture that here. Yes, I did sit there on a bench for a bit.

This poem is an Arabian Onegin Sonnet.
An Arabian Sonnet is simply one that is comprised of two Quatrains followed by two Tercets, where each stanza is mono-rhymed. Written in iambic pentameter.The Onegin aspect adds a touch of complexity to the rhyme scheme by repeating end rhymes (rather than refrain lines) in the following rhyme scheme: A,a,A,a - B,B,b,b - C,c,C - D,D,d. The Capital letters indicate the rhymes that are repeated. The trick here is to write the repeats so that they sound unique and the theme flows smoothly. not sure why it was named that or who named it, as it doesn't resemble the Pushkin Sonnet in any manner.
I am not particularly enamored with the format, as without the author notes, a reader could assume the poet is a sloppy rhymer.

This photograph was taken by the author himself on January 14, 2017.



Chapter 437
On Powdered Path

By Treischel


On winter walks, with twinkling snow,
are sparkling bursts with twinkling snow,
that brighten up a chilly day,
on powdered path.

Where footprints in the aftermath
leave fleeting presence evidence
on winter walks, with twinkling snow,
on powdered path.

How crisp and clean, oh arctic air!
I breathe your pure effervescence!
Then saunter in this silent scene
on powdered path.



Author Notes I love to walk in the winter time. We are fortunate that the St. Paul park trails get plowed well after a big snow, like this photo shows of the path I often take along Battle Creek. I caught this woman out enjoying the path. I said "Hi! Beautiful day out, isn't it?", as we passed. She said, "It sure is!"

This poem is a Baccresieze.
Baccresieze is an invented form, apparently created as an exercise in repetition. This verse form has two and a half refrains. It is attributed to E. Ernest Murell.

The Baccresieze is:
1. Stanzaic, written in 3 quatrains.
2. Syllabic, L1,L2,L3 are 8 syllables and L4 is 4 syllables in each Quatrain.
3. Refrained, L4 of each Quatrain is a refrain and L1 of the first quatrain is repeated as L3 in the 2nd quatrain.
4. The last 4 syllables of L1 are repeated as the last 4 syllables of L2 in the first quatrain only.
5. Rhymed, with a complicated rhyme scheme of: AaxB bxAB xxxB, with the x lines being unrhymed.

This photograph with taken by author himself on January 12, 2017.


Chapter 438
Bluejay Array

By Treischel

Bluejay boldly dining on dangling tray.
Returning to re-nourish almost any day.
Fine feathers of cornflower color,
barbed head sporting a sable black collar,
some birds may seem much duller.
Dense alabaster abdomen display
completes its classic apparel array.

Author Notes A Bluejay is a bird with beautiful pastel blue, black, and white coloring. It also has a distinctive pointed head. This one is standing in the seed tray on my back porch. This poem is intended to merely be a poetic description.

This poem is a Complex Alliterisen.
The Complex Alliterisen is an invented verse form originating in India. Udit Bhatia, a student at Delhi Public School System, first created the form. It relies heavily on alliteration and carries a variable syllabic meter. Here is a format with mathematical skill requirements, as it adds and subtracts syllables to determine the length of each line.

The Complex Allitersen is determined as follows:
1. A heptastich, (a poem in 7 lines).
2. Syllabic. The first line of the poem sets up the number of syllables for each subsequent line. L1,L6, and L7 are the same number of syllables.
Formula:........................Example 1...Example 2...Example 3
L1= x syllables...................6.................8................10
L2= x + 2 syllables.............8.............. 10................12
L3= x -1 syllables...............5.................7..................9
L4= x + 1 syllables.............7.................6................11
L6= x syllables....................6.................8................10
L7= x syllables....................6.................8................10

3. Alliterated. There must be at least 2 alliterations in each line.
4. The form may be rhymed or unrhymed. For this form is chose to rhyme: aabbbaa

This photograph was taken by the author himself on October 26, 2016.


Chapter 439
A Window on the World

By Treischel




As more my lifetime passes,
I've relished pristine grasses,
          as gentle breezes swirled.
And if, on some tomorrow,
I dream that I might borrow
          a window on the world,

don't blame me if I go there,
and watch the waters flow there,
          or hear a meadowlark.
A goose flock may be squawking,
and lovers may be walking
          within my fav'rite park

For once I was a mourner,
and sought to find a corner
          where water rippled by.
It's there that you will find me,
where solitude will bind me,
          and if you ask me why,

I'll say to look about you,
for with you or without you
          it's hanging in the air.
The secret to un-stressing
is feeling Nature's blessing.
          There's beauty everywhere!




 

Author Notes This is a part of the Lagoon picnic area in Lake Phalen Regional Park of St. Paul, Minnesota. It is one of my favorite places to go walk. Here I show it with some fall color. The image, taken through the Oak trees, framed it nicely and inspired the window mention in the poem.

This poem is a Dixon Poem.
The Dixon measures the differences between masculine and feminine rhyme. Patterned after the poem, "The Feathers of the Willow" by English poet, Richard Watson Dixon (1833-1900).
The Dixon is stanzaic, written in any number of Sestets made up of 2 interrhymed Tercets. It is metered in trimeter, with 2 of the lines of each Tercet being feminine iambic trimeter (7 sylables with the line ending on an unstressed syllable), and one being maasculine (6 syllables) . The rhyme scmeme is:
aabccb in each Sestet.
For this poem the total rhyme scheme was:
aabccb ddeffe gghiih jjkllk.
The third and sixth lines of each Sestet are typically indented.
The feminine lines also feature "falling rhyme", where the rhyme of the last two syllables is on the first (or stressed syllable), while ending on the unstressed syllable.


Chapter 440
Determination

By Treischel



Determination often wins the day.
No problem can't be solved, when it's applied.
Once one decides, desires won't be denied
when tasks are viewed in any different way.

Investigative skills are on display,
as problem resolution acts are tried.
Unique attempts may often coincide
when tasks are viewed in any different way.

Though some solutions seem a bit risque,
or acrobatic feats of some renown,
they'll win, while even hanging upside down,
when tasks are viewed in any different way.

Determination often wins the day,
when tasks are viewed in any different way.



Author Notes This squirrel was definitely determined. It tried for hours to get some suet. It finally did get a bunch of it.

This poem is a Echo Sonnet.
The Echo Sonnbet was created by Jeff Green. The hallmark of the Echo Sonnet is in its repeating lines. It uses two. The first line is repeated in the Couplet. The last line of the first Quatrain is repeated as a last line throughout the poem. It consists of three Quatrains followed by a Couplet written in iambic pentameter. It features enveloping rhymes in the stanzas. The rhyme scheme is:
A1,b,b,A2 - a,c,c,A2 - a,d,d,A2 - A1,A2, although I actually modified the scheme a bit to:
A1,b,b,A2 - a,b,b,A2 - a,c,c, A2- A1,A2, to really set off the impact of the last Quatrain.

This picture was taken by the author himself, in his back yard on Ocxtober 21. 2016.


Chapter 441
Tree Trimmer

By Treischel


To trim a tree is such an art,
When tall oak branches reach the sky.
An arborist must clamber up
To deftly wield his power saw.

When tall oak branches reach the sky,
They stretch to places, like my roof.
Winds can cause a house-top hazard
As banging branches whip and beat.

An arborist must clamber up
To reach the true offensive limb.
With monkey-like tree climbing skill,
He'll execute tree surgery.

To deftly wield his power saw,
He'll stand in places squirrels hang out.
A job not for the faint-of-heart,
A slip make cause grave consequence.

Author Notes I recently hired a tree trimming company to trim back some limbs of a large oak tree that had limbs hanging over my roof. We had to wait until after the first frost to trim an oak tree without doing it harm. This picture was of one of the workers in action. As you might observe, that was quite a daring stance, and an intriguing cut. I call that cut a "Behind-the-Back-Leg-Tweener-Clip." Do you see the sawdust? It moved me to write this verse.

This poem is a Retourne Poem.
A Retourne is a poem done in a French style, having a tumbling Refrain. A Refrain is where a line , or several, repeat. In this case, three lines repeat in a tumbling order. Much French verse from the Middle Ages is written with a refrain. However unlike verse of that same period, it is unrhymed which makes it suitable for short narratives.

The Retourne structure is as follows:
1. A poem in 16 lines, made up of 4 quatrains.
2. Syllabic, 8 syllable lines. No specific meter
3. Written with a tumbling refrain. The lines of the first stanza provide the opening refrain for each of the ensuing stanzas.
4. Total rhyme scheme is: xABC Axxx Bxxx Cxxx, where tne x is an unrhymed line.
5. Unrhymed.

This photograph was taken by the author's neighbor, Ken on November 4, 2016, and published with his permission.


Chapter 442
The Heart in the City

By Treischel


I traveled down the central city street
in downtown, where the buildings frame the sky,
where architecture reigns, like mountain peaks,
and cars roam canyons made from formed concrete,
as trains and buses often wander by
the buildings bonded using bridge techniques.

These manmade monuments consume the scene,
and green's a color seldom ever seen.

And yet, there's beauty that your eyes may greet!
An ordered chaos sets this sight apart.
Unique detail provides esthetic treat ,
while "ancient" often meets "state-of-the-art."
Now note that smokey statement in the heat
that says that "Even cities have a heart."


Author Notes This is Fourth Street in downtown St. Paul, Minnesota. I wrote this ekphrastic poem that describes the scene as I observed it from a skywalk while my wife and I enjoyed a winter walk. I was drawn by the smoke, and was amazed to see the some of it formed a heart. That was real, not in any way doctored. So this will become part of my Animated Stills collection.

This poem is an Alfred Dorn Sonnet.
An Alfred Dorn Sonnet is named after its creator and is distinguished by two Sestets bridged by a Couplet. The first one is an Italian Sestet, having a rhyme scheme of: abcabc. The second one is a Sicilian Sestet, taking the scheme of: aeaeae. So the entire rhyme scheme becomes abcabc dd aeaeae. Note that the "a" rhyme is a linking rhyme between the 2 Sestets. Written in iambic pentameter. The turn (or volta) is at line 9, as in most Sonnets.

This photograph was taken by the author himself using his cell phone on Jan 6, 2017.


Chapter 443
When the Rains Stop

By Treischel




For months there was nothing but showers,
but rains put the buds on the bowers.
For the wonder of spring
is it grows everything,
resulting in fields full of flowers.

Now, fields will attract many kinds
of creatures with blooms on their minds.
Like bees and butterflies
and insects any size-
the kinds that a botanist finds.

There was an old lady who goes
with flowers held up to her nose.

That way she could tell
their wonderful smell.

And dream of lost loves, I suppose.



Author Notes We've had a very cool and wet spring here. The plants and flowers love it. Even the clover is huge, as this photo shows my wife, Karen, standing in front of some and smelling them. I thought this a perfect image for Limerick, as she was hamming it up.

This poem is a Limerick Sonnet with an added Envoi.
I created this format myself.
The format uses the signature Limerick syllable count and rhyme scheme. A limerick is a form of poetry which is sometimes obscene with humorous intent. The oldest attested text in this form is a Latin prayer by Thomas Aquinas of the 13th century. The form appeared in England in the early years of the 18th century. It was popularized by Edward Lear in the 19th century, although he did not use the term. Gershon Legman, who compiled the largest and most scholarly anthology, held that the true limerick, as a folk form, is always obscene, and cites similar opinions by Arnold Bennett and George Bernard Shaw, describing the clean limerick as a "periodic fad and object of magazine contests, rarely rising above mediocrity". From a folkloric point of view, the form is essentially transgressive. Violation of taboo is part of its function. Of course that's all debatable. But at the very least, they should be fun.
According to a dictionary, a Limerick form consists of 5 lines (two long, followed by two short, and closed by 1 long. The first, second and fifth lines must have matching lengths of seven to ten syllables (8 or 9 is most typical). The third and fourth lines only have between five and seven matching syllables. So there is a bit of flexibility.
That is the form I modified to create this Sonnet. Since the Limerick uses a Quintet (5 line) structure, I elected to give it two closing couplets rather than one, in order to achieve the classic 14 lines. For the first stanza, I mixed 9 with 6 syllables. In the second stanza , I used 8 with 6. The Volta comes at the first couplet (lines 11 and 12).
The rhyme scheme is: aabba ccddc ee ff.
The syllable count is: 9,9,6,6,9 -8,8,6,6,8- 8,8- 5,5. The Envoi has 8
The long cadence is is either: da DUM da da DUM da da DuM da (feminine rhyme); or, da DUM da da DUM da da DUM (masculine rhytme).
The short cadence is either: da DUM da da DUM; or, da DUM da da DUM da

I couldn't resist adding that last line here as an Envoi. An Envoi is an added line or lines to a poem. One could argue that it , therefore, is no longer a Sonnet, but I've found many Sonnet forms with more than 14 lines.

This photograph was taken by the author himself on June 25, 2017.



Chapter 444
Holiday Greetings

By Treischel


A greeting
Christmas Caligram
Joy to All

Author Notes Just a Holiday Mesasage to my Fanstory Friends

This poem is a Caligram plus a 3-5-3 message.
A Calligram is a poem, phrase, or word in which the typeface, calligraphy or handwriting is arranged in a way that creates a visual image. The image created by the words expresses visually what the word, or words, say. In a poem, it manifests visually the theme presented by the text of the poem. Guillaume Apollinaire was a famous calligram writer and author of a book of poems called Calligrammes. His poem written in the form of the Eiffel Tower is an example of a calligram.

The image was created by the author using a WordArt program and Powerpoint. I had to use Powerpoint because I couldn't get it to work in the Word Program, I then saved it as a JPG.

I hope you can read it If not, Here is what it says. Merry Christmas. Holiday Greetings.
The top rail of the sleigh: "Santa's Sleigh. Ready to ride tonight. Just hook up the reindeer just right. Then away, Away."
Sleigh bottom: "Jolly old Saint Nick will be moving really quick. To visit every town. Before the dawn."
Down brakets: "HO HO" AND "HO HO."
Runner blade: "This sleigh, it will slide through the snow, or through the air it will go. To give Santa a smooth ride."
Sack: "Gifts and toys for all the good girls and good boys."
Santa's Hat: "Yes, I am Santa Clause"
Santa's Face: " - Ho ho. Merry"
Santa's belly: "Christmas to all."


Chapter 445
Happy New Year

By Treischel

It's out with the old,
in with the new.
Make it snappy!

Author Notes I did this one on a challenge/inspiration from our fellow Fanstorian, Pantytgynt. Took a few days to work it out.

This is a Calligram.
A Calligram is a poem that is also an image, through the organization of words only.

For those who can't quite make out the words, it reads;

Happy New Year!

Celebrate the final ending of that tired old year.
Old man time
is past his prime,
and waiting for that replacement to appear.

So, let's pop that champagne cork,
while the ball is dropping in New York.

New Year baby child I am. I am Happy.
It's out with the old, in with the new.
Make it snappy!



Chapter 446
The Wind Sings the Bugle Song

By Treischel



Whenever I hear the sad sound of the bugles
play taps by the flag as the sky loses daylight,
I'm touched by the feeling of rev'rence that it brings,
of souls that have fallen in far off past battles,
who drift on the sound, like some ghosts in the twilight.
"I lay here today for your freedom," the wind sings.

ta ta da-a
ta ta DA-A-A
ta ta da
ta ta da
ta ta D-A-A-A-a-a

Author Notes Although there were no bugles in this image, the flags convey my sentiments. The impetus of this poem was the meter. I was seeking to come up with a rolling concept, and the flags flowing in the wind sparked my muse. I thought it was interesting to capture the moon with the sun very low in the sky as well.

The stanza is written Amphribach meter.
Amphribach is a trisyllabic foot (3 syllables per foot), the arrangement of the syllables of which is short, long, short in quantitative meter, or unstressed, stressed, unstressed in accentual meter. Due to its nature, this meter lends itself to feminine rhymes. It is the main foot used in the construction of the typical limerick, as in "There once was / a girl from / Nantucket." Notice that was 3 trimetered feet. Some books by Dr. Seuss contain many lines written in amphibrachs, such as these from "If I Ran the Circus:"

All ready / to put up / the tents for / my circus.
I think I / will call it / the Circus / McGurkus.

In mine, I went with a 4 foot (12 syllable) meter to achieve a rolling, flowing. Then in the evvoi, I used an anapest trimedtered approach.

This picture was taken by the author himself on January 14, 2017.


Chapter 447
Field Goal

By Treischel

to
win it
with last-second
flair

Author Notes Anticipating a typical playoff outcome whereby a team wins the game with a last-second fieldgoal.

This poem is a Calligram, where the image is created by the text.


Chapter 448
Petrified Warrior

By Treischel



Petrified warrior, turned to wood,
who died erect, right where he stood,
a shaman, warrior, or a brave,
is silent, deep in forest grave.
What does he see?
What does he hear?
Beyond that tree
is there a deer?
Does danger travel to his ear,
or is he watching you and me?

This guardian in wilderness,
what power could this thing possess?
Could spirit strength still lie within?
I feel a force in its stone skin.
How did he die?
Can he survive?
Is he a spy?
Is wood alive?
When such an object may revive,
this eerie feel, I can't deny,

Fear grows inside.
I'm petrified.




Author Notes While out in the woods, I spotted a broken tree that seemed to have a head on its remaining trunk, so I captured its image. Besides the head, I could make out the light outline of an arm, and my imagination also perceived an animal pelt draped across its shoulder. Ah, I thought, here is a warrior or shaman, frozen in time. Hence, the inspiration for this poem.

This will become part of my Animated Stills series.

This poem is a Duodecatain.
A duodecatain is a format of my own creation. I searched the internet for anything like it, and didn't find one. So, to the best of my knowledge, I claimed and named it. A decatain is a stanza of ten lines. This format has two, thus the "duo" designation. Here are the rules:
1. The meter is either iambic or trochaic, or a mixture of both.
2. There are two 10 line stanzas followed by a rhyming couplet.
3. The lines are a mix of tetrameter and dimeter with the following syllable counts:
8888444488 8888444488 44
4. The rhyme scheme in each decatain is:
aabbcdcddc (but the rhymes can vary between the stanzas).
5. The couplet rhyme is ee.
Note that I used questions in this poem, but that is not a requirement.

This photograph was taken by the author himself on October 29, 2016.


Chapter 449
A Winter Visit

By Treischel



Old Man Winter sat on my porch,
and, arriving uninvited
lounged forthwith within my best perch.
Many flaky friends alighted,
leaving my back deck in the lurch.

Wonder just how long that they'll stay?
Hope they leave before I see Spring,
who's expected here any day,
bringing life to everything.
Winter, please, go hit the byways!

I'll just keep my shovel handy,
fearing that they'll stay too long.
I will watch while sipping brandy,
hinting that they don't belong.
Quick departure would be dandy.

Here is where I'll chase those flakes from,
If they linger past their welcome.


Author Notes This is a picture of my back deck, through my screen patio door, that I took on January 22, 2018. That snow is still on the ground, although I have since shoveled off my deck and driveway. I thought a bit of humor appropriate. Note the intentional use of some near rhymes.

This poem is a Diciasette Sonnet
The Diciasette Sonnet is one of the elongated Sonnet formats. I just created this one today. My latest book of Sonnets identifies others: the 15 Line
Carrett Sonnet, the 20 Line Caudette Sonnet, the 28 Line Compound Sonnet, Dante√¢??s
20 Line Version, the 21 Line Fusion Sonnet, the 18 Line Heroic Sonnet, the 17 Line
Septillian Sonnet, and finally, the 16 Line Super Sonnet. Diciasette is the Italian word fot the number 17. So, this is a 17 line Sonnet similar to the Septillian Sonnet that Nancy E. Davis created. Hers also uses Quintrains (5 line stanzas) for its stanzas with a closing couplet, but her rhyme scheme is aabbb ccddd eefff gg, while mine is ababa cdcdc efefe gg. Also, her meter is iambic Pentameter, while mine is trochaic tetrameter.
So, a Diciasette Sonnet is a 17 line Sonnet with 3 each, 5 line stanzas, followed by a rhyming closing couplet. It is written in trochaic tetrameter with a rhyme scheme of:
ababa cdcdc efefe gg, or any other rhyme scheme that fits a 5 line stanzaic pattern.

This photograph was taken by the author himself.


Chapter 450
Mystified by Butterfly

By Treischel

 

 
 
Oh my!
My toe!”
Cry I.
“Displays a
Butterfly!”
What a delight.
My eye
is aglow.”
Mystified!
 
 

Author Notes Another poem derived from my trip to the sculpture garden at Minnetrista, Minnesota. That Monarch Butterfly on the boy's toe is actually a part of the statue. That sculpture garden was a wonderful place for my Muse to play.

This poem is an Amaranth Poem. I rhymed this one, to the Potlatch, Magic 9 scheme.
The Amaranth is an invented verse form that was created as a teaching tool by Viola Gardner. It makes deliberate use of the 9 most common metric feet. Each line is "one metric foot", with the pattern changing from line to line.
The Amaranth is a 9 line strophe (it is a stand alone poem); that is metric, using the 9 most common metric feet in a sequence. The sequence can vary as long as it uses one of the 9 meters in each line. Here I show a stressed syllable as "/", while an unstressed one is "-". In my example I used:

L1 Spondee.........(//)
L2 Iamb...............(-/)
L3 Trochee..........(/-)
L4 Amphribach....(-/-)
L5 Amprimancer.(/-/)
L6 Choriamb.......(/--/) Note; this 4 syllable foot
L7 Phyric.............(--)
L8 Anapest..........(--/)
L9 Dactyl.............(/--)

The form can be rhymed at the discretion of the poet. Although the metric restrictions are probably more than enough to contend with by most poets in this verse form.

Some definitions vary. I have seen a couple that insist that the sequence must be fixed as:
L1 Spondee (//)
L2 Iamb (-/)
L3 Pyrrhic (//)
L4 Dactyl (/--)
L5 Trochee (/-)
L6 Amphimacer (/-/)
L7 Choriamb (/--/)
L8 Anapest (--/)
L9 Amphibrach (-/-)
But that is just the sequence originally created by Viola. The key is accommodating the 9 meters in some sequence. Bysides being a good teaching tool, this is a good brain exercise for any poet who wants to bone-up on their meters.

To accommodate the Magic 9 challenge, the rhyme scheme is:
abacadaba.
I used a near rhyme on the last line for the "a" rhyme.

This photograph was taken by the author himself on September 30, 2017.


Chapter 451
Forgotten Patriot

By Treischel



She galloped with great urgency
upon her horse,
an awesome force,
to further the insurgency.
She spread the news
as war ensues.
Unheralded, this patriot,
like Paul Revere,
with danger near,
was ready, although long forgot.



Author Notes Another eclectic statue from that engaging Sculpture Garden in Minnetrista, Mn. that inspired this ekphrastic verse.

It is not well known, but there were more riders the night of "the eighteenth of April of '75," and some were actually women. Henry Wadsworth Longfellow immortalized only one in his poem "The Midnight Ride." The rest are long forgotten. So, here's to the forgotten female patriot. Of course, you British patrons may have a different term for her.

This poem is an Amphion.
An Amphion is another 20th century American verse form created by Viola Berg. It alternates enveloping tetrameter lines with coupled dimeter lines in a set sequence. The rules of an Amphion are :
1. A poem of 10 lines.
2. An iambic metered poem with tetrameter lines that alternate with sets of dimeter couplets in an enveloping manner.
3. Rhyme scheme: abbaccdeed
4. Syllabic, with a syllable count of: 8,4,4,8,4,4,8,4,4,8

This is not to be confused with the poem "Amphion," by Alfred Lord Tennyson, which was not a format, but a poem that is about a Greek god of that same name. This is a format.

This photograph was taken by the author himself on September 30, 2017.


Chapter 452
Meter

By Treischel

 
HI There,
my friends!
I am
excited
as a lark,
getting a chance
now to
demonstrate
This new form.



 

Author Notes There are many kinds of meters. I created a collage that shows parking meters, a house meter, a thermometer, and a barometer. Poetry has meter too. In fact there are 9 principle meters in the poet's toolbox. Here I have demonstrated (1) spondee, then (2) iambic, followed by (3) trochee, (4) amphribach, then (5) anapest and (6) dactyl. Those are the best known. After dactyl followed some lesser known meters: (7) choriam, then (8) phyric, and lastly (9) amphrimancer. I have highlighted the text to show the stressed syllables.

This poem is an Amaranth.
The Amaranth is an invented verse form that was created as a teaching tool by Viola Gardner. It makes deliberate use of the 9 most common metric feet. Each line is "one metric foot", withthe pattern changing from line to line.
The Amaranth is a 9 line strophe (it is a stand alone poem); that is metric, using the 9 most common metric feet in a sequence. The sequence can vary as long as it uses one of the 9 meters in each line. Here I show a stressed syllable as "/", while an unstressed one is "-". In my example I used:

L1 Spondee.........(//)
L2 Iamb...............(-/)
L3 Trochee..........(/-)
L4 Amphribach....(-/-)
L5 Anapest..........(--/)
L6 Dactyl.............(/--)
L7 Choriamb.......(/--/) Note; this 4 syllable foot
L8 Phyric.............(--)
L9 Amprimancer..(/-/)

The form can be rhymed at the discretion of the poet. Although the metric restrictions are probably more than enough to contend with by most poets in this verse form.

Some definitions vary. I have seen a couple that insist that the sequence must be fixed as:
L1 Spondee (//)
L2 Iamb (-/)
L3 Pyrrhic (//)
L4 Dactyl (/--)
L5 Trochee (/-)
L6 Amphimacer (/-/)
L7 Choriamb (/--/)
L8 Anapest (--/)
L9 Amphibrach (-/-)
But that is just the sequence originally created by Viola. The key is accommodating the 9 meters in some sequence. Bysides being a good teaching tool, this is a good brain exercise for any poet who wants to bone-up on their meters.

This image was created by the author for this poem using the Photo Mixer app. on 3/5/2018.


Chapter 453
Let Us Fly!

By Treischel



We will learn to fly
when our spirits set us free.
What joy it will be!

As
we do,
there are few
who can achieve
scarce sweet destiny,
cutting bonds, as they leave
strong restraint bound gravity
powered through a lifted wingspan,
forged from within, with pure energy.
Only wearing cool garb, like Superman's.


Author Notes Here is another statue out at that Sculpture Gardens. When I first spotted this one, I thought, "Goodness, what can I say about this one?" Well, here it is.

This poem is a combination of two formats, the 5-7-5 and the Ehteree. Both are syllable based formats. The 5-7-5 is a 3 line poem with the syllable counts just like the name suggests. An Etheree is a 10 line poem that builds line per line from 1 syllable up to 10. Neither requires rhyme or meter.

However, for this poem I used Rhyme, Alliteration, and Caesura.

I chose these two in order for the text layout to actually mimic the form of the statue some what.


Chapter 454
Anxiety

By Treischel



I carry my anxiety like chains.
My thoughts converge in layered chain-link rust,
held down by fear, mistrust.
They seem to weigh like metal mental strains.
I can't begin to get out of my bed,
for life just feels a heavy weight to bear.
I'll stay where I am hooked.
embracing thoughts that wander through my head,
that tell me constantly that, I don't care.
This way I keep my problems overlooked.

Oh what begat this foul predicament?
I once had personality and brains,
but now I'm wrapped in chains
from hours and days in worry that I spent,
that trapped me in a web that turned to steel,
and left me in this horrifying shape,
upon shame's marble shelf.
Now, how confined, pressed down, depressed, I feel,
within a prison that I can't escape.
I must confess. I did this to myself!





Author Notes Another poem inspired from the images that I captured at the Sculpture Garden in Minnetrista, Minnesota. This one had a powerful impact, but it took a while before my thoughts coalesced. Certainly there was a feeling of imprisonment, but I couldn't decide whether it was within a fiend's torture chamber, or something else. I finally decided that it felt self imposed, which led to this poem. I think I captured the many elements this image yielded.

This poem is a Swinburne Decastitch.
A Swinburne Decastich combines the rhyming pattern of an interrupted Petrachan Sonnet, with the breathing cadence of common iambic meter. He may not have created it, but Algernon Charles Swinburne composed one and exposed it to the public in his "A Ballad of Death". So, it was named for him.
A Decastitch is a poem of 10 lines. The rules for a Swinburne Decastitch are:
It is Stanzaic, consisting of any number of Stanzas.
It is Syllabic: 10/10/6/10/10/10/6/10/10/10
It is Rhymed: abbacdecde
It is composed in iambic Meter.

This photograph was taken by the author himself on September 30, 2017.


Chapter 455
The Escape

By Treischel



Devils were chasing me hard as the wind all day.
War painted warriors called whoops at the back of me.
Faster, we pushed to the limits, while making way
Heading straight north to the bluffs at the tumbling sea.

Nicked by an arrow, I felt they were reaching me.
Still we were drawing quite close to the narrow cliffs.
Frightened the heights were too high for a place to flee,
seeing the rocks far below make such swirling riffs.

However, ....

There was need to escape from this tribal pursuit,
and much greater desire, as to keeping alive.
So I chose to achieve the most dangerous route.
It's the kind that results in a harrowing dive.

But my horse wasn't happy at sights such as that.
I cajoled, and I coaxed. Had to finally scold.
Then at last my steed crouched like a leaping tomcat,
as we splashed, yet unharmed, in the sea. Oh so cold!



Author Notes This is another picture I took at the sculpture garden, located in Minnetrista, Minnesota. These artworks aren't labeled in any way, but are left to the viewer's imagination. This was mine.

Route is pronounce in an American vernacular that rhymes with "root" or "shoot,"
rather than the British, which would rhyme with "shout" or "pout."

The poem is a Galloping Denturn.
The GALLOPING DENTURN is a poetry form invented by Dennis William Turner, writing on the All Poetry website. So you can guess the derivation of "Denturn."
It is comprised of two DACTYLIC Tetrameter Quatrains stating a point of view. A Dactyl consists of a 3 syllable foot. So a Tetrameter has four feet, or 12 syllables, with a hard stress on the first syllable, followed by 2 unstressed (Dum-da -da).

This is followed by a stand-alone one, two or three syllable word or phrase. For example: but -unless -but then - although - until, - however etc.,
Providing the TURN.

The concluding two Quatrains, are written in ANAPESTIC Tetrameter, to make the argument, (emphasized by the change of meter). Anapestic meter is the opposite of Dactylic. It starts with 2 unstressed syllables followed by a stressed one, per foot (da-da-Dum).

The Galloping aspect comes from the 3 syllable feet of both meters, which are more flowing than the 2 syllable foot of an Iambic Meter. So I guess a Denturn written in Iambic Tetrameter would be called a Marching Denturn, and have 8 syllable lines.

This photograph was taken by the author himself on September 30, 2017.


Chapter 456
Devastated Damsel

By Treischel



The whole world was one swirl to fraught frustrated girl.
The winds whirled as she twirled on the pinnacle's edge.
Her heart was as shorn as the clothes she'd worn,
and as cold as the chilly wind -
and as cold as the chilly wind.
She cried, "Since I mourn all the hurts I've borne,
I shall die with sworn satisfied sigh - that's my pledge."
With last "Goodbye," she breached the sky in leaping hurl.


Author Notes This statue is located in a park in Minnetrista, Minnesota called Big Stone Sculpture Park. In looking at this statue, I felt she was a person in distress, on the edge, and in the wind. So that's how I interpreted it for this poem.

This poem ia an Amanda's Pinch.
The Amanda's Pinch was created by Amanda J. Norton, Oct. 18, 2013 on the Allpoety website.This is a syllabic form with syllable count of:
12/12/10/8/8/10/12/12
and a Rhyme Scheme of:
abcDDcba, (the DD indicates that line 5 is a refrain of line 4)
Alliteration is required in every line.
It it should be well centered, with its structure giving the impression of being gently pinched together,then springing back in a mirror image.
It may be doubled for two stanzas, is the poet so desires.

This photograph was taken by the author himself on September 30, 2017.


Chapter 457
The Fairy and the Gnome

By Treischel



Tinkerbell, as fairies will, was chasing waterfalls.
Heard some calls, nearby the falls. Wondering "Whatever?"
A clever gnome, named Jerome, was spouting protocols,
which soon forestalls an anticipated endeavor.
"The rules," says he, "by most, are meant to be distinguished
by the established boundaries of these properties."
Made her freeze, with unease, and ask him to embellish,
since gibberish translation exceeds her expertise.

Jerome said, "Well, this tale I tell, about principle
is simple. Do not trespass. This place is spiritual.
It's unusual, but this ground must stay untrampled.
Set an example, and leave it safe and beautiful."
So Tinkerbell, whose heart was full, sprinkled fairy-dust
with expansive thrust. The earth became a carousel
as she cast a spell of flowers. Colors readjust
in robust rainbow curves. Gifts from tiny Tinkerbell.

From that time on, the story goes,
this special spot, now, always glows.



Author Notes Here's another of my Animated Stills. I took this image of a waterfall and noticed a reflection, in the water's lower center, something that reminded me of the Fairy, Tinkerbell. Nearby, and just above, is a pointed rock that shows two eyes and a nose, which made me think of a gnome. From that, this story ensued.

This poem is a Droighneach.
Droighneach (dra'iy-nach) Gaelic, is sometimes referred to as "the thorny" because of the degree of difficulty in writing this Gaelic Verse Form that employs cross rhyme and requires 3 syllable end words. It is a traditional Irish quatrain stanza of 9-to-13-syllable lines alternately rimed (abab), always on 3-syllable words, with at least two cross-rimes linking the pair of lines in each half and involving those lines' end-words, plus alliteration in every line, usually between the end-word and the preceding stressed (always the case for a quatrain) last line. Being Irish, it also requires the dunedh, meaning it should end where it began (opening word or phrase or line repeated at the end).

So again, the elements of the Droighneach are:

-a loose stanzaic form usually written with any number of octaves but it could be quatrains.
-syllabic with each line with 9 to 13 syllables.
-terminated, written with 3 syllable end words.
-rhymed, with alternating end rhyme abab cdcd etc.
-composed with cross rhyme. There are at least two cross-rhymes in each couplet
-and alliteration in each line;
-usually the final word of the line alliterates with the preceding stressed word, this is always true of the last line.
-written with the defining features of most Celtic poems, cywddydd (harmony of sound) and dunadh (beginning and ending the poem with the same word, phrase or line.)
(x x d) b x x x (x x a)
x x x x a x x x (x x b)
x x x x x b (x x a)
x x x x a x x (x x b)
x x x x x d x x (x x c)
x x x c x x x x x x (x x d)
x x d x x x x x x (x x c)
x x x x c x (d x d)

Pretty complex, huh! I wrote this first attempt with 13 syllables. I also added a closing couplet as an envoi. Let me know if I succeeded or failed.

This photograph was taken by the author himself on August 12, 2017.


Chapter 458
Ice Lions

By Treischel

The frozen lions of the ice,
asleep in Winter's chill,
dream of tropical paradise
while sitting on this frigid hill.
What caused them to be here?
A magic touch of wizard's will?

Their genesis is far from clear.
Unknown, the cause remaining still.
The consequence of doom, I fear.
Their tomb -- the ice, upon this shore.
Don't deign to draw too near,
caught in its spell forevermore.

Asleep in Winter's chill,
What caused them to be here?
Unkown, the cause remaining still.
Don't deign to draw too near.
For the wisp of the wind is death,
and the ice may draw your last breath.

Author Notes This image captured my imagination, as I see at least 3 lions in it. I hope that you do too. I gave it a sinister interpretation. The poem will become part of my Animated Still collections, which I hope to publish later this year.

This poem is a Dandizette.
The format was sponsored by the FanStory Potlatch Poetry Club this week. So I thought I'd try one.
Dandizette form created by Discoveria of Allpoetry.com is composed of
3 six line stanzas. The form is partially inspired by the villanelle and
features a tricky repetition of 4 refrain lines in the final stanza.

The form is syllabic with asyllable count for the first two stanzas is:
8/6/8/8/6/8.
The last stanza has lines of:
6/6/6/6/8/8 syllables.
The rhyme scheme is:
a,B1,a,b,C1,b, - c,B2,c,d,C2,d - B1,C1,B2,C2,e,e. (The capital letters designate the repeated lines, while the numbers differentiate them from where they were originally located)
The final stanza is composed of lines 2 (B1), 5 (C1), 8 (B2), and 11 (C2) from the previous two stanzas, plus a concluding rhyming couplet. Where they reappear
in the last stanza, the four repeated lines should
make sense together as well as making sense where they
are first used.
Meter is optional.

This photograph was taken by the author himself on March 2, 2013.




Chapter 459
Global Warmings

By Treischel

(Note: A Wreath of Sonnets contains 15 interlinked Sonnets. The Master Sonnet contains the first and last lines of each succeeding Sonnet)
 
Master Sonnet – The Proposition
 
Grasp this, the Earth is warming more today,
Lambasting our entire globe somehow.
Our polar caps are melting fast away,
Begetting great disaster here and now.
As population grows in leaps and bounds,
Lament that it depends on fossil fuels.
 
While carbon footprint troublingly astounds.
All think it breaks the atmospheric rules.
Repeating, this is based on settled science,
Misinformation isn’t really true,
In fact most, loudly protest in defiance,
Negating the assumptions that they drew.
Grant there are greater forces here at play.
Since you have been bombarded every day.
 
 
Sonnet 2 – The Declaration
 
Grasp this, the Earth is warming more today.
We hear about it daily in the news,
that there are deadly forces here at play,
as commentators clearly state their views
 
Of course, they’re right! As there is certain proof
from measurements established over years.
The doubters can no longer stay aloof,
when weather change so constantly appears.
 
The reach of weather touches all our lives
The planet hosts the home of everything.
The question stands upon, how each survives.
While all these warming states keep on recurring
 
Are any human actions we allow
lambasting our entire globe somehow?
 
 
Sonnet 3  – The Question
 
Lambasting our entire globe somehow,
indeed the weather has been quite erratic.
But has that been the case for only now?
The rules about the weather as climatic
 
depends upon the time you start to count.
As in the scheme of things, it’s not been long
that data’s been recorded in amount.
The Earth’s been warming since Ice Ages gone.
 
Indeed our cars put carbon  in the air,
and smokestacks do provide for even more.
As greenhouse gases give us all a scare
the atmosphere gains heat forever more?
 
Most disconcerting yet, it’s sad to say,
our polar caps are melting fast away.
 
 
Sonnet 4 – The Proof
 
Our polar caps are melting fast away.
The evidence is very plain to see.
Antarctica is shrinking every day.
It’s documented plainly on TV
 
The North Pole’s situation is the same,
as Polar Bears are losing  habitat.
Alaska’s glacier losses are a shame.
The Northwest Passage is a Coup d’etat.
 
This all resulting in a rising sea,
while weather patterns soon become extreme
The public’s plunged into hyperbole.,
awakened now to this nightmarish dream.
 
Believing what the medias allow,
begetting great disaster here and now..
 
 
Sonnet 5 – The Push Exposure
 
Begetting great disaster, here and now,
concern has now been seeded in the masses,
as politics are eager to avow
and plan eliminating greenhouse gases.
 
An industry supported by large grants,
and biased by internal obligations
from pseudo-scientific sycophants
are sponsored by their host, United Nations.
 
The cost of their achieving such success
exceeds the world’s entire GDP,
and even should they solve this climate mess,
it may reduce the brunt by one degree.
 
Another situation that compounds –
as population grows in leaps and bounds.
 
 
Sonnet 6 – The Real Concerns
 
As population grows in leaps and bounds,
which puts enormous pressure on resources.
Besides diminishing, they are unsound,
polluted, and discarded, no recourses.
 
What should be so much greater a concern –
clean air, clean water, safe environment,
are what the population has to learn,
to help our asset dearth predicament.
 
Regardless of the climate change debate,
we must continue finding world solutions,
as China’s use and India’s needs are great,
and do present, by far, the most pollutions.
 
We all must follow economic rules,
Lament that it depends, on fossil fuels.
 
 
Sonnet 7 – Mandate, or Facilitate
 
Lament that it depends, on fossil fuels.
Our cars, our planes, our businesses and homes,
some may convert to substitute renewals,
like water, wind, or wave and thermal zones.
 
When everyone was moved from horse to car,
the government provided roads and bridges,
while commerce was the leading avatar,
no mandates were enacted or litigious.
 
Transition took its place inherently,
as infrastructure grew with the demand.
All with consumer capability
combustion engines ruled throughout the land.
 
Today, this great achievement still resounds,
While carbon footprint troublingly astounds.
 
 
Sonnet 8 – The Drama
 
While Carbon footprint troublingly astounds,
a least that’s what the commentators say,
they show the biased data that surrounds
the elemental principles at play.
 
When shown with liberal interpretations
and data chosen matching forced desires,
they add deliberate manipulations.
That’s all, hysterical Hoaxes require.
 
When pushed by a political agenda
and matched by boundless obligated funds
put forth under mass media’s umbrella,
and loaded with its pseudo-science guns.
 
With public’s lack of scientific tools,
All think it breaks the atmospheric rules.
 
 
Sonnet 9 – Counterpoints
 
All think it breaks the atmospheric rules.
Yet, CO2’s essential for all life.
It fuels all vegetative molecules
that helps preserve the World’s diverse wildlife.
 
The Earth’s passed through some cold and warming cycles.
It’s likely to pass through them once again.
Despite those global warming’s true disciples
their models haven’t proved a single thing.
 
In fact, predictions mostly have been wrong.
The oceans aren’t increasing at their rates.
instead of twenty feet, more likely just one.
And polar ice is now increasing, data states.
 
The reasons seem to be false news reliance,
repeating, this is based on settled science.
 
Sonnet 10. The Lie
 
Repeating, this is based on settled science,
There’s only seventy five UN guys,
against thirty one thousand in defiance,
supporting climate warming alibis.
 
The NOs contain nine thousand PHDs
who call the proposition a pure hoax.
and even signed petition expressly
debunking the assessment fear evokes.
 
So, how did the reporting get so wrong?
Elitist propaganda made this mess,
all backed by diplomats who string along,
and then supported by a biased press.
 
They claim disastrous fates are overdue,
Misinformation isn’t really true.
 
 
 
Sonnet 11 – Dissenters
 
Misinformation isn’t really true.
The Weather Channel head disputes the claim,
and Green Peace’s founder does so too.
 The NIPCC’s dissenting came
 
about when scientists became concerned
the UN study seemed so predisposed.
Amazing what non-governed body learned.
The books were cooked by data UN chose.
 
They differ in US and Global data.
UN reports had intermixed the two.
There’s tree ring, also ice core proxy data
that gainsay what those experts say to you.
 
They claim that it’s all really settled science,
In fact most, loudly protest in defiance.
 
 
Sonnet 12 – The Beat Goes On
 
In fact most, loudly protest in defiance.
yet propaganda stays fresh in the News.
An industry promoting pseudo-science,
gets pushed ahead through liberal interviews.
 
The advocates of warming, getting rich,
continue playing on the public’s fears,
that future generations need to switch
from fossil fuels. It’s urgent to change gears!
 
Ignoring vast improvements in the trades,
displacement of the workforce employees,
with costs exceeding GDP for decades,
to impact weather by a few degrees.
 
The public would be outraged if they knew,
Negating the assumptions that they drew.
 
 
Sonnet 13 – Still there’s Hope
 
Negating the assumptions that they drew,
‘bout blame that’s based on the greenhouse effect,
that’s driven by results of CO2
collecting in the atmosphere unchecked.
 
Now if climactic modelings were true,
it’s possibly already far too late.
The planet’s tragedy is overdue.
Although the US leads in this debate.
 
The other nations need at least catch up.
technology provides some new sensations
that promise less occasion to disrupt
all the planetary machinations.
 
Regardless what misfortune prophets say,
grant there are greater forces here at play.
 
 
Sonnet 14 – It’s the Sun.
 
Grant there are greater forces here at play.
The sun, it seems, may be the major culprit.
with solar actions – spots and flare displays.
There’s also variance in solar orbit.
 
As an ellipse distorts the span away
from Sun’s dramatic heat activity.
I ask you, what’s to likely interplay
with ocean temperatures and ice at sea?
 
Do you believe  it’s car fumes tipping charts?
Do you believe ice melts because we breathe,
or maybe methane oozing from cow farts?
Then global warming’s what you must believe.
 
You’ve bought into what panic merchants say.
Since you have been bombarded every day.
 
 
Sonnet 15 – The Conclusion
 
Since you have been bombarded every day,
by fields that warm today and cool tomorrow,
just as it’s done so many times each way,
it’s gone from tropical to ice and more snow.
 
Ten thousand times worse is volcanic ash
Hurled high into our open atmosphere,
Inhibiting all sunlight in a flash.
So many times that thing has happened here.
 
Forever Earth has undergone such change.
Unlikely is our chance to rearrange.
So worry ‘bout the weather, if you must.
Still, Earth will keep recurring boom and bust.
 
Reject the flow of propaganda sway.
Grasp this, the Earth is warming more today.
 

 

Author Notes Now don't get me wrong. I am not saying that we shouldn't eventually evolve away from fossil fuels, that bad things aren't happening with the icecaps and weather patterns, or that we shouldn't protect the environment at all. I believe we must be fully aware of our impacts, and do everything possible to protect the environment, so that it can be passed on to future generations.

What I do object to is the notion that, Global warming is a settled science, and that anyone who thinks otherwise is either stupid, disillusioned, or a liar. Global warming is far from settled science. But don't just take my word for it.

Here is an excellent scientific overview by Fred Singer of the NIPCC on how the IPCC report was flawed.
http://climatechangereconsidered.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/Global-Warming-Surprises-AT-2017.pdf

Here's a link to the NIPCC website, with an overview of their views.
http://climatechangereconsidered.org/

Here are 9 arguments against Climate Change.
https://www.dailywire.com/news/9767/9-things-you-need-know-about-climate-change-hoax-aaron-bandler

Here's a comprehensive list of articles and videos that dispute climate Change.
http://www.globalwarminghoax.com/news.php

Here's the dissenting opinion from the founder of Green Peace.
https://www.breitbart.com/radio/2019/03/07/greenpeace-founder-global-warming-hoax-pushed-corrupt-scientists-hooked-government-grants/

Here's a reference to the 31,000 Scientists who signed an Anti-climate Change petition, and includes comments from the CEO of the Weather Channel.
https://newspunch.com/tens-of-thousands-of-scientists-declare-climate-change-a-hoax/

Here's the actual petition as signed. Be sure to read it, and check out the tab of frequently asked questions.
http://www.petitionproject.org/

This poem is a Wreath of Sonnets.
A Wreath of Sonnets sometimes also called a Garland of Sonnets, consists of 15 Sonnets and was previously enriched with an Acrostic in the Concluding Sonnet. The Wreath of Sonnets was first written by France Pre¬°eren in 1833. It was published for the first time in a German-language newspaper on 22 February 1834. Pre¬°eren tied together the motives of his own unhappy love towards Julija Primic with that of an unhappy, subjugated homeland.

Besides the complex and sophisticated content, A Wreath of Sonnets has a Format where the Last Line of one Sonnet becomes the First Line of the next one (just like the Crown does). The first line of the Master, also becomes the last line of the 15th Sonnet making all fifteen Sonnets a Circle or intertwining "garland" of lyric poetry. One Sonnet cannot exist without the other. The First Lines of all the single fourteen Sonnets form in turn another Sonnet, called the "Master Theme" or the "Magistrate", linking all the Sonnets together. In the more modern versions, this Master Sonnet becomes the First Sonnet. It is an Acrostic Sonnet and contains all the first and last lines of the other Sonnets.

This photograph was taken by the author himself of frozen a pier in Lake Superior on March 2, 2013.



Chapter 460
Sudden Passing

By Treischel

He died suddenly, my brother.
Shocked to discover none other.
We all were shocked to discover
he died suddenly, my brother.

He was the last one we'd expect.
Blood clot left unchecked, I suspect.
His heart rejects blood clot unchecked.
He was the last one we'd expect.

His fam'ly now alone, bereft.
It seems a sudden future theft.
Suddenly there's no future left!
His fam'ly now alone, bereft.

He died suddenly, my brother.
There will never be another.
He was the last one we'd expect.
The issue, one you can't detect.
His fam'ly now alone, bereft.
We comfort those my brother left.


Author Notes My brother, Richard, suddenly passed away on July 13, 2018
while out in his yard pushing a small lawn fertilizer. It was a hot muggy day.
He just collapsed. Age 67. He was the fourth of five sons and 2 girls my parents had. I was the third.
My two older brothers, Chuck (died age 60 of ALS) and Bobby (died age 2 of accidental poisoning), died years ago. I am the oldest living sibling, along with brother number 5, Joe, and my sisters Mary and Laurie.
As I said in the poem, Richard (we called him Dick most of his life, but in later years he said he's no longer a Dick) was the last one we'd expected to die when he did. He was small, thin, athletic, and full of energy. Here I am; overweight, high blood pressure, bad cholesterol, diabetic, and 70. Go figure.

This poem is an Atrina.
The ATRINA form was invented by Keith Metcalf Drew of the AllPoetry website.
A stanzaic poem of 18 lines, consisting of 3 quatrains and a sestet.

It is isosyllabic. Each line has 8 syllables.
Rhymed: AaaA BbbB CccC AaBbCc where the capital letters indicate refrain lines.
(AaaABbbBCccCAaBbCc)

The first and last lines in each verse are exactly the same.
The third line in each verse is of similar wording to the second line or reversed. However, it is preferred to use the same words but reversed.
Then when you have written the three verses, the fourth verse consists of the first lines (or first 2 lines) from each of the three verses.

This picture is one I took of Richard in his back yard, 2015.




Chapter 461
Drop a Letter

By Treischel

This Lipogram, it seems to me,
is just a drill, not poetry.
So try to leave a letter out
and find what substitution is about.

So write upon a page with glee.
Then alter anything you must.
Just like a puzzle's mystery,
the stanza's pattern will adjust.


Author Notes See how the letter S is dropping off the word cares in my image. That is from my Who Cares Clock picture.

This is a Lipogram.
A Lipogram is an exercise that intentionally omits a letter (consonant or vowel) out of the verse written. Here, I intentionally tried to write a poem without the designated letter - C. I wanted to make sure it was a very common letter. The more stanzas, the more difficult it becomes. Leaving a vowel out is the most difficult. The letter to be dropped, should be designated before your begin writing the poem. What makes a poem, is the application of poetic techniques, such as: rhyme, meter, alliteration, poetic imagery, and so on.

It is a drill the any poet can use to hone their skills, as you have to look to substitute words containing the designated letter with another one, as a poet must often do in order to meet a format, rhyme, or meter,
When I started to write this one, the second line was written:
is exercise, not poetry.
Since "exercise" contained a C, I replaced it with "just a drill":
is just a drill, not poetry.
It seems there are three ways to accomplish a Lipogram. First, you can begin writing, making adjustments line-by-line as you go. Secondly, one can just write away, then go back afterwards and make substitutions. Finally, one can write a poem with deciding in advance and accidentally determine, after the fact, it is missing a certain letter. That is cheating. In my example, I found out later that it also omits the letters Q, V, and X.


Chapter 462
Bullies

By Treischel



When will the bullies stop hurting the weak?
When will the victims be able to speak?
Bystander silence gives no hope at all.
School yards are teeming with those they could call --
teachers and parents, adults in the hall.
Calls to stop bullying reaches a peak.
Public outcrying's no longer unique.

People all say, this must stop!
Children must learn a love swap,
set by examples that come from the top.

From the top, from the top, from the top.


But we find bullies aren't only in schools,
as there are millions of internet fools.
Facebook and Twitter, or YouTube, they're on,
daily destroying their innocent pawn,
posting with venom, decorum is gone.
They take delight in misusing their tools,
Pushing agendas, they break all the rules.

People all say, this must stop!
Nations must learn a love swap,
set by examples that come from the top.

From the top, from the top, from the top.

Author Notes "From the top" doesn't mean just the President. It also applies to parents in their homes, leaders in their businesses, politicians in their constituencies, programmers on television, producers of movies, athletes on or off the field, activists in private places, or anyone pushing divisive agendas. The internet has become a cyber-bully. Quite often, those very people decrying bullying in schools, are doing it on the internet, or even in public themselves.

This is a Dactyl Poem
A Dactyl Poem is a verse, often used in Greek or Latin. While a Trochee is the opposite of an iamb, a Dactyl is the opposite of an Anapest. A Dactyl is a long syllable followed by two short syllables, as determined by syllable weight. In accentual verse, often used in English, it is a stressed syllable followed by two unstressed syllables.

iambic - da Dum, da Dum
trochaic - Dum da, Dum da
anapestic - da da Dum, da da Dum
dactylic - Dum da da, Dum da da

For this poem, I tried to maintain a line with a 10 syllable meter and a cadence like:
Dum-da-da Dum-da-da Dum-da-da-Dum

This photograph was taken by the author himself on December 2, 2012 at a Dinosaur exhibit in St. Paul, Mn.


Chapter 463
Ode to a Nuthatch

By Treischel



I see the Nuthatch. It's choosing a nut
to bring to crevice and crack with its beak.
Its body shows its pedigree somewhat,
short tail, stout body, and long bill's sharp peak.

Nuthatch, Oh Nuthatch
so little, so small
on tree trunks, we'll see you
go upside down

Your home's like a porthole in a tree
a cozy place to lay a clutch of eggs,
that's lined with sap from forest evergreens.
I see the Nuthatch. It's choosing a nut


Author Notes This is a White-bellied Nuthatch that is one of many that frequents my back deck's feeder. They come all years long weathering winter in pine trees. The Nuthatches constitute a genus, Sitta, of small passerine birds. Characterized by large heads, short tails, and powerful bills and feet. Most species exhibit grey or bluish upperparts. They forage for insects hidden in or under bark by climbing along tree trunks and branches, sometimes upside-down. Their habit of wedging a large food item in a crevice and then hacking at it with their strong bills gives this group its English name. Most nuthatches are woodland birds and the majority are found in coniferous or other evergreen forests. All nuthatches nest in cavities. Most use natural holes or old woodpecker nests. Several species reduce the size of the entrance hole and seal up cracks with mud. The nuthatch makes the nest secure by daubing sticky conifer resin globules around the entrance, the male applying the resin outside and the female inside. The resin may deter predators or competitors (the resident birds avoid the resin by diving straight through the entrance hole). The white-breasted nuthatch smears blister beetles around the entrance to its nest, and it has been suggested that the unpleasant smell from the crushed insects deters squirrels, its chief competitor for natural tree cavities, and most predators. Source: Wikipedia.

This poem is a Dorsimbra.
I was introduced to it today while reviewing Flylikeaneagle's poem, Shining Lights.
The Dorsimbra, a poetry form created by Eve Braden, Frieda Doris and Robert Simonton. So, by combining their names you get Dorsimbra. It is a set form of three stanzas of four lines each. Since the Dorsimbra requires three different sorts of form writing.

Stanza One: Four lines of iambic pentameter, rhymed abab.
Stanza Two: Four lines of short and snappy free verse.
Stanza Three: Four lines of iambic pentameter blank verse, where the last line repeats the first line of Stanza One.

Not a particularly creative format. To me, it seems like the rhyme fades away. It does blend a transition from rhymed verse to blank verse.

This photograph was taken by the author himself on July 10, 2016.



Chapter 464
Kings and Queens

By Treischel

Royal
are kings and queens
who graced so many thrones
throughout the Middle Ages scene's
castles.

Castles,
power places,
palaces display wealth,
provide protected living spaces
to all.

To all
loyal subjects,
they give law and order
and tax within the border of
the King.

The King,
purple bedecked,
holds his people's respect,
if both wise and just, while wearing
the crown.

The crown
upon the Queen,
wearing emerald gown,
she is looking so serene and
royal.

Author Notes Just a few thoughts about kings and queens. The king and queen of hearts are from a deck of standard Bicycle playing cards.

This poem is a Crown Cinquain.
Unlike other crown poems with 7 poems combined, this one has only five interlinked Cinquain poems. That's because this one is meant literally to become a crown. Also, Cinquains are a structure where 5 plays an important part. Just look at it sideways. You see, when left justified, the Cinquain's 2,4,6,8,2 structure forms a nice point. When a few Cinquains are joined in sequence, they form several jagged points, like a crown does. A Crown Cinquain interlinks each separate poem by having the last two syllables of each poem become the first two of the next. When you put them together, they make several points. The first two syllables of the first poem also become the last two syllables of the last poem. Thereby, making a circular link. If you cut them out of a sheet of paper and linked first and last with tape, it would literally make a crown.
This poem is the one in my series of Cinquains in which I have written a Cinquain, Reverse Cinquain, Mirror Cinquain, Didactic Cinquain, Butterfly Cinquain, Garland Cinquain, Lantern, and now the Crown Cinquain. There are 5 other types of poems that are 5 line poems, but do not follow the Cinquain structure. They are: Quintains, Tankas, 5-7-5-7-7 Poems, Tetractys, and Teapot Dictionary (when the word has 5 syllables).

This photograph was taken by the author himself on February 15, 2019.




Chapter 465
Fly to Gardens

By Treischel

We fly
on silken wings
that flutter in the breeze.
Our colors flash with each upswing.
Bright as
any flowers
on which we may alight,
while we hasten through your lovely
gardens.

Author Notes This butterfly landed on a sidewalk near me, as I was out on a stroll. I waited until it opened it wings wide, then captured this photo. I was delighted by its black wings outlined in white broken lines. The white spots and orange/red accents were spectacular.
This one is a Red Admiral (Vanessa atlanta). It was first described by Carl Linnaeus in his 1758 10th edition of Systema Naturae. The Red Admiral is widely distributed across temperate regions of North Africa, the Americas, Europe, Asia, and the Caribbean. Red Admirals are territorial; females will only mate with males that hold territory. Territories are subject to intrusion by other males. Territories tend to be oval, 24 feet long and 42 feet wide. Males patrol their territory by flying around the perimeter between 7 and 30 times per hour. On average, territory holders interact with intruders 10 to 15 times per hour. When another male encroaches on a Red Admiral's territory, the resident chases away the intruder, often in a vertical, helical path to disorient or tire out the intruder while minimizing the horizontal distance it travels from its perch. The Red Admiral immediately returns to its territory after chasing off encroaching males. It is known as an unusually people-friendly butterfly, often landing on and using humans as perches. Source: Wikipedia.

So, if you are sitting outside, and one befriends you as a perch, you can spend a pleasant afternoon watching its patrolling antics first hand.

This poem is a Butterfly Cinquain.
The Butterfly Cinquain it a syllabic format that takes two 5 line Cinquains, with a syllable count of 2,4,6,8,2, and joins them together, by linking the last to syllables of the first to the first two of the second Cinquain, to form a single 9 line poem (because they both share 1 link) that makes a butterfly pattern. A lovely result. It need not rhyme, but I chose to add some rhyme here.

This photograph was taken by the author himself on May 23, 2017.


Chapter 466
Bar Tale of a Bruin

By Treischel


Ahoyo, buddy boys! Me tale may get attention.
Did I fail ta make mention of liquid counterpoise?
Yea, me purse employs a liberal libation
ta any congregation that enjoys enterprise.
It's about a beastly bruin and this forester.
In a Nor'easter, I were just plain persuin'
a big bear had been doin' much disaster.
Me partner, as attester, says ahoyo.

Remember last November, when winds were blustery?
It were destiny! That carnivorous contender,
crossing through the timber, felt uncertain mystery,
climbed a tree, to become an object observer.
Through the pounding gale, he saw me silhouette.
This ranger, soaking wet, could not countervail,
or prevail, and If attacked, my eternal epithet
would be set, for most mourners ta remember.

Providence prevailed, me friends, unforeseen.
For in between, elusive roots entangled
me legs that dangled. Causin' turf ta intervene,
dischargin' me gun's magazine, whilst I'm disabled.
Could have sent the deadly discharge anywhere.
The bloody bullet killed the bear, to me amazement,
I guess me death weren't meant ta be, though unaware,
I here declare, let's drink ta providence!

Ta Providence!

Author Notes Now I didn't get this picture in the wild. It is a stuffed bear in a sporting goods store near my house, Cabellas. It's actually a Kodiak bear. They stand 10 to 11 feet tall. Wouldn't want to run across one in the wild, either. Its image inspired this poem, as I pondered how it might have died. Which brought me to the bar in Alaska, were this old Irish logger spins his tale.

Ahoyo - an Alaskan term that means "Listen up," believed to be an Inuit interpretative of the nautical term "Ahoy."
Counterpoise - a factor or force that balances or neutralizes another. Having an opposing and balancing effect.
Bruin - Bear
Nor'easter - a strong storm blown in from the northeast of the Atlantic on the eastern coast of North America.
Carnivorous - meat eating
Countervail - offset, counter something with equal force.
Epithet - an adjective or descriptive phrase expressing a quality characteristic of a person. Here it would be "dead" or "the late."

This poem is a Droighneach.
Droighneach (dra'iy-nach) an Irish form, is sometimes referred to as "the thorny" because of the degree of difficulty in writing this Gaelic Verse Form that employs cross rhyme and requires 3 syllable end words. It is a traditional Irish quatrain stanza of 9-to-13-syllable lines alternately rhymed (abab), always on 3-syllable words, with at least two cross-rimes linking the pair of lines in each half and involving those lines' end-words, plus alliteration in every line, usually between the end-word and the preceding stressed (always the case for a quatrain) last line. Being Irish, it also requires the dunedh, meaning it should end where it began (opening word, or phrase, or line, repeated at the end).

So again, the elements of the Droighneach are:
-a loose stanzaic form usually written with any number of octaves but it could be quatrains.
-syllabic each line with 9 to 13 syllables.
-terminated, written with 3 syllable end words.
-rhymed, with alternating end rhyme abab cdcd etc.
-composed with cross rhyme. There are at least two cross-rhymes in each couplet
-and alliteration in each line;
-written with the defining features of most Celtic poems, cywddydd (harmony of sound) and dunadh (beginning and ending the poem with the same word, phrase or line.). It charts something like this, where the x's represent syllables, the letters show rhymes, and the parens show the 3 syllable words.

(x x d) b x x x (x x a)
x x x x a x x x (x x b)
x x x x x b (x x a)
x x x x a x x (x x b)
x x x x x d x x (x x c)
x x x c x x x x x x (x x d)
x x d x x x x x x (x x c)
x x x x c x (d x d)
Pretty complex, huh! Hope I got it right

I added a touch of a dialect, and made in first person.

This photograph was taken by author himself on October 12, 2017.


Chapter 467
Waterwheel

By Treischel



Water
w h i r l i n g
wheel.


Author Notes This waterwheel is attached to a Music Store located in Hinkley, Minnesota. The wheel does actually spin.

This Poem is a Brevette
The Brevette, created by Emily Romano, consists of a subject (noun), verb, and object (noun), in this exact order. The verb should show an ongoing action. This is done by spacing out the letters in the verb. There are only three words in the poem, giving it the title Brevette.

snail
l e a k s
slime

Each of the three words may have any number of syllables, but it is desireable that the poem have balance in the choice of these words. Unlike haiku, there are no other rules to follow.
In this one, I also added alliteration of the W, but that is not a requirement.

This photograph was taken by the author himself on July 7, 2017.


Chapter 468
Mustang Blues

By Treischel



I've dreamed of owning this one car,
a beautiful Mustang machine.
I have been searching near and far
and this one was the best by far.

A thoroughbred beast through and through
with power and styling galore
its color was a vibrant blue
a shimmering majestic blue

It had everything I adored,
complete with home-grown pedigree.
American, built here by Ford.
Its price tag established by Ford.

Oh Dear! Here, my good sense took stock
as I anguished in sticker shock.

Author Notes I had taken my car in for service, when I spotted this beauty out on the dealer's lot. I drooled and dreamed. Then I walked up to it and read the pricing. Ouch! Oh well, it was fun to dream.

This poem is a Dahquain.
I came across this format when I reviewed damommy's poem, Here I come, that she had submitted for the potlatch club.
The Dahquain form was invented by D.A. Hemingway, aka, DianeAH on Allpoetry.com. Therefor the form is a derivation from her initials, and the standard quatrain. It features a unique rhyming pattern that uses repeating rhyme words (word refrains)

The meter is iambic Tetrameter written in Quatrains.
The rhyme scheme is:
axAA bxBB cxCC ....dd, etc. As many stanzas as the poet desires

Minimum of 4 stanzas (including couplet),

Ends with a separate rhyming couplet. (So the poem has 14 lines or more)
The capital letters indicate that the words are identical.

In the rhyme pattern indicated by axAA bxBB cxCC dxDD, the lines indicated with capitals contain word refrains.

This photograph was taken by the author himself on August 9, 2018.


Chapter 469
At Lover's Lane

By Treischel

Warning: The author has noted that this contains the highest level of sexual content.

Bra swings rhythmically from radio dial.

Author Notes Thanks for reading. No image beyond imagination required


Chapter 470
Change the Mood

By Treischel


Sad
melancholy blue
moaning, weeping, crying
dejected, depressed: joyous, ecstatic
smiling, dancing, singing
cheerfully gladly
Happy

Author Notes A mood can be changed with a smile from a stranger, a hug from a child, the antics of a pet, lovely music, or flowers. This image is my wife, Karen. Her joy in a field of flowers, made me smile. Give or find joy.
This poem is a Diamante. A Diamante is a seven-lined contrast poem set up in a diamond shape. A Diamante "pronounced dee-uh-MAHN-tay" is an unrhymed seven-line poem. The beginning and ending lines are the shortest, while the lines in the middle are longer, giving diamante poems a diamond shape. "Diamante" is the Italian word for diamond, so this poetic form is named for this diamond shape.
Believe it or not, the diamante was invented several years ago. It was created by an American poet named Iris McClellan Tiedt in 1969, and has become very popular in schools.
The first line begins with a noun/subject, and second line contains two adjectives that describe the beginning noun. The third line contains three words ending in -ing relating to the noun/subject. The forth line contains two words that describe the noun/subject and two that describe the closing synonym/antonym. If using an antonym for the ending, this is where the shift should occur. In the fifth line are three more -ing words describing the ending antonym/synonym, and the sixth are two more adjectives describing the ending antonym/synonym. The last line ends with the first noun's antonym or synonym.
To make it a bit simpler, here is a diagram.
Line 1: Noun or subject
Line 2: Two Adjectives describing the first noun/subject
Line 3: Three -ing words describing the first noun/subject
Line 4: Four words: two about the first noun/subject, two about the antonym/synonym
Line 5: Three -ing words about the antonym/synonym
Line 6: Two adjectives describing the antonym/synonym
Line 7: Antonym/synonym for the subject

This photograph was taken by the author himself in June, 2017


Chapter 471
Strong Winds

By Treischel

As strong winds blow around the world.
all nature leans
to harsh unleashed distress,
while some collapse. Left broken and bereft.

Just like when maelstrom's currents swirled
chaotic scenes
that left an awful mess,
it leaves survivors hopelessly bereft.

So, culture's fabric gets unfurled
by sudden means
beneath cyclonic stress,
while precious treasures disappear by theft.

Beware those winds! Life's imperiled.
Unlike what seems,
you'll find that they're obsessed
unhinged, star-crossed, and really leaning left.

Author Notes There is a lot a upheaval in the world lately, whether it's the British Brexit, the yellow jackets in Paris, socialism ruining Venezuela, Russia and China's machinations, or the movement to socialism in the USA, it is being driven by radical policies - the left, liberals, and the internet bullies. I was referring to that in this poem. The image partly helped inspire it.

This poem is a set of Merritrains, which are unique Quatrains structured by FanStory√??√?¬¢??s very own MissMerri. So the name comes from her moniker and the use of sets of quatrains. I discovered it when reviewing her poem, Love√??√?¬¢??s Power. So, subject to her final approval, I am naming it so, here.

The poem consists of 2 or more pairs of Quatrains. There is a specific syllabic structure of:
8-4-6-10 syllables per Quatrain.

The rhyme scheme is also unique. There is no rhyme scheme within a stanza, but rather, between stanzas. Each line of a stanza rhymes with the corresponding line of the next stanza. So each line 1 of a pair of stanzas rhyme. Each line 2 of a pair of stanza rhymes with the other line 2s, and so on. Every 2 sets of Quatrains will that scheme.

So the overall rhyme scheme is:
abcd abcd efgh efgh

The meter should be iambic on all lines.

For this poem, I took it one step further, and repeated identical rhyming, twice.


This photograph was taken by the author himself on October 16, 2018.


Chapter 472
The Coming

By Treischel



Morning came in flashing glory,
with strange movements in the sky.
Stars were moving, dancing, swirling.
Then a vision caught my eye.
There, it stood on the horizon.
Couldn't quite identify.
Seemed to be a fiery jewel
holding in a glowing cross.
Could this be the second coming?
Moments held me at a loss.

There and then, I knelt in torment,
lost in silent, fervent prayer.
Thought about the life I'm living.
Filled me with a deep despair.
Was I worthy of God's blessing?
Wondered what my sins declare.
Recognized my past digressions.
Asked forgiveness on the spot.
Tear drops soaked the shoreline gravel.
"Save me!" was my foremost thought.

Felt a presence growing closer.
Knew it sensed contrite shed tears.
Tenderness was all around me,
Comforting my deepest fears.
Then there came His gentle sweet voice
softly speaking in my ear.
"You have been a faithful servant,
shared my message everywhere,
faithful to my ten commandments."
I was lifted to the air.

Author Notes This picture was taken by my daughter, Aisha. She sent it to me saying, "I thought I saw Jesus coming today." That inspired my poem. My poetic description of the event known as the Rapture.

This poem is a Decannelle.
The Decannelle is:
1. A Decastich (or Decatain), a poem in 10 lines.

2. Metered in trochaic tetrameter with alternating 8-7-8-7-8-7-8-7-8-7 syllables causing the odd numbered lines to end with feminine end words, and the even lines having two end rhymes (a, and b).

3. Rhymed. The rhyme scheme is:
xaxaxaxbxb (with the x being the unrhymed line).
Sort of a hop-scotch rhyming pattern of every other line.

Trochaic - a line made up of trochees. The trochaic line is the opposite of iambic. In a two syllable metered foot, the hard accent is on the first syllable rather than the second.

Tetrameter - a poetic line of 4 metered feet. Each foot contains 2 syllables. So tetrameter contains 8 syllables per line.

Trochaic Tetrameter - where the stressed syllables (S) is first and the unstressed syllable (U) is second, for 4 meteric feet. S-U, S-U, S-U, S-U. They went rowing down the river

Iambic Tetrameter - where the stressed syllables (S) is second and the unstressed syllable (U) is first, for 4 meteric feet. U-S, U-S, U-S, U-S.
He said, "To be, or not to be."

This photograph is part of the author's family album.


Chapter 473
The Tiger Swallowtail

By Treischel

Just to see this stunning brilliant yellow,
that's seen the brush of Michael Angelo,
flutter through the sky, this winged fellow.
Brilliant yellow!
Brilliant yellow!

Twas formed to fly! Perceive a swallowtail,
on mirrored wings, where Rorscarch blots prevail.
Its ruddered lower wing helps it to sail.
A swallowtail!
A swallowtail!

Its black and yellow hues can't be denied.
Those tiger stripes, as monikers, provide
distinctive traits, as they are classified.
Can't be denied!
Can't be denied!

What is more lovely than a butterfly?
What single word is used to signify?
'Tis only "beauty" can personify,
a butterfly --
a butterfly.

Author Notes This is a female Tiger Swallowtail butterfly. The blue spots at the base of its wings define its gender. The first known drawing of a North America butterfly was of an Eastern Tiger Swallowtail. It was drawn by John White in 1587, during Sir Walter Raleigh's third expedition to Virginia. White named his drawing "Mamankanois" which is believed to be a Native American word for "butterfly".

The eastern tiger swallowtail is the state butterfly of Alabama, Delaware, Georgia, North Carolina and South Carolina, and is the state insect of Virginia.

Adults use a wide range of food sources, most preferring to nectar on sturdy plants with red or pink flowers. Males participate in a behavior called puddling, in which they congregate on mud, damp gravel or puddles. They extract sodium ions and amino acids from these sources which aid in reproduction. Males that puddle are typically fresh, and puddle only for their first couple of days. Females will occasionally puddle, but do not form congregations.

This poem is a Catskill.
A Catskill is a poem format created by I Am Cat, Catherine Ginn of Fanstory, and named by Barb H. The format consists of stanzas of 3 lines with mono-rhymed iambic pentameter, followed by 2 lines, where the last four syllables of the first line are repeated twice behind the Tercet. It can contain any number of stanzas.

So, you can graph each syllable of a typical stanza as follows:

xxxxxxRRR(Ra)
xxxxxxxxxa
xxxxxxxxxa
RRR(Ra)
RRR(Ra)

Where the x√¢??s are open to anything. The a√¢??s are the rhyme, and the r√¢??s are the repeated syllables. In parens is a syllable that is both a repeat and a rhyme.

I did make a modification in the first stanza by using two trochaic lines interposed with an iambic.

This photograph was taken by the author himself on July 13, 2017.


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