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reconciled

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RE: Prescription Drugs
Reply on October 16, 2017 08:43 PM << Modifed October 16 at 9:13PM >>
hush now....lets not let everyone know how close we are.





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RE: Prescription Drugs
Reply on October 17, 2017 04:24 AM
Mrs Major, absolutely without a doubt medication should be available to those who need it, and there are definitely people who do. I'm sure I will, at some point, be one of them. Make no mistake, if I get something properly serious, I'll be straight down the conventional medical route.

What I am talking about is how a culture in which illness is seen as a profit making opportunity can, and has, led to unscrupulous over-prescribing in some instances. And there's also a sub-culture of profiteers that has developed off the back of that, the 'naturopaths' who charge just as much, if not more, for a concoction that does absolutely nothing, but happens to be 'natural', usually under the banner of 'Big Pharma doesn't want you to know about this miracle cure ...'




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RE: Prescription Drugs
Reply on October 17, 2017 08:17 AM



I agree there are those kind of problems,..on the other hand, I speak for those medical professionals that DO have their patients best interests at heart...and I believe they are in th majority...


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RE: Prescription Drugs
Reply on October 18, 2017 12:19 AM
Yes, it's very sad to see some of the bashing of traditional medicine - a discipline that has been developed over the course of hundreds of years, whose practitioners are almost always dedicated to their profession and caring of their patients.

CD Richards

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RE: Prescription Drugs
Reply on October 18, 2017 12:49 AM

Interesting point, Steve.

I have the utmost respect for the science behind current western medicine.

I also agree some doctors are incredibly caring, professional and highly dedicated to their profession and their patients.

As for blanket statements concerning all members of any profession, I don't go much for that.

One constantly hears of certain professions of which practically all members are thought to be the salt of the Earth. Teachers come to mind, police, and doctors. We seem to be constantly hearing from these various groups themselves how great they are.

It has always grated on my nerves that individuals of some professions are thought of more highly than the rest of the population. Why is it that a doctor, a teacher, a lawyer (chuckles), or an accountant can witness my signature for many purposes, whereas a janitor, or a plumber, or a shopkeeper or the guy who holds the stop/go sign at the roadworks cannot? Is there some reason these people in the former group are assumed to be more honest and trustworthy than those in the latter? That certainly isn't my experience.

Does overservicing exist? Yes it does. Do some doctors favour certain drugs because they get bigger kickbacks from some pharmaceutical companies? I'd be surprised if none did. Is there massive wastage in parts of the health care industry, and complete underfunding of others due to poor decisions by politicians and bureaucrats? I think all of us can come up with examples.

Are the majority of doctors decent, honest people? I hope so.



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RE: Prescription Drugs
Reply on October 18, 2017 02:27 AM
I haven't been to the doctor in many years as I was raised by my grandmother and she managed to steer clear of them for most of her life and passed that practice on to her charges. It was a different time in her youth and doctors were hard to come by. When she fell down and broke her hip digging in her garden at age eighty-five, the doctors were mystified because she had no medical history for them to reference. She taught me, rightly and wrongly, doctors were only to be called upon in dire circumstance.

That said, even though I am an infrequent user of medical services, knowing they are there, should I need them, brings me a great sense of security. I have deep respect for the men and women populating the profession and even more so for those who also volunteer their services in humanitarian crises around the world. Even though I was misdiagnosed a few times, I remain impressed doctors are as successful as they are treating so many different and strong personalities for illnesses that are known and boldly venturing forth to learn treatments for super bugs that dedicate their entire miserable, worthless life cycles trying to outsmart us. It's also worth bearing in mind the medical profession, like all populations, contains its quota of charlatans and bad actors. That shouldn't surprise anyone.

As far as alternative medicines go, I steer clear of most health stores because other than tofu, organic produce and baked goods, they're like drugstores filled with potions and herbs that can be equally toxic when ingested at incorrect dosages. Just because they're labelled "natural" does not mean they are harmless. And many drugs used for the treatment of diseases were obtained from natural sources until we learned how to reproduce them synthetically.

I have no problem with people making an honest living from the sale of these items provided they're forthright and not making false claims about having the cure for cancer and the like. I do however think alternative practitioners should be restricted to the same rules as mainstream doctors who use pharmacologically and surgery to correct or cure symptoms. I also think they should be board certified to ensure public safety, because "snake oil salesmen" without neither credentials nor integrity can be motivated to take a quick route to easy street. Maybe they already are certified?

Teaching children about physical and emotional hygiene and healthy living starting in grade school should be a must. In my opinion the word prevention should not be used because it promises an outcome for which there is no guarantee, even though healthy, active living greatly increases our odds. People who do everything right still get sick for inexplicable reasons. Still it's a good thing for us to take a proactive approach in our own health and if honey garlic and apple cider vinegar beverages make you feel good, by all means consume them.

On another note, the opioid crisis is most alarming and especially given they can be purchased online from China. We have an opioid epidemic in Canada too and it's a killer. The drug should never have been put on the market in the first place because its dangerously addictive quality seems to kick in during an average two-week treatment cycle. I think it's good for us to remember that just because we can invent something doesn't mean we should.

AND a good start in stopping Pharma gouging is for elected officials who create laws to get out from under the influence and money of special interests and lobbyists.



Sarkems
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RE: Prescription Drugs
Reply on October 18, 2017 03:54 AM << Modifed October 18 at 4:20AM >>
This post was never intended to be a 'bashing' of medical practitioners, and I'm sorry it has come across like that. It was really meant to be a look at how a variety of factors can lead to, and have led to, problems in certain areas.

It's a whole bunch of things that lead to the issues we have here in the channel islands, and that town in WV. Lack of support for those suffering ill health and pain in the workplace puts pressure on doctors like ours on the island, who are aware of the financial tightrope many walk on, here, to provide people with drugs which enable them to push on through, when really they shouldn't BE at work, and should be getting the problem sorted at, for example, the dentist.

I also wanted to highlight the differences between a private healthcare only environment, and an NHS environment, and how I, as someone who has lived in both, perceive some differences. I observe higher instances of reliance on pain medication here, and only ONE of the reasons for that is that the doctor, unconstrained by an NHS budget, has more freedom to prescribe these in larger quantities.

What I'm trying to do is point out the pitfalls of healthcare as a money-making enterprise. Does that mean I'm saying doctors shouldn't be paid, or should get the same wages as, say, an unskilled labourer? Not at all. They've studied for many years to acquire a vast an complex knowledge of the human body and the thousands of things that can go wrong with it.

But I don't think the money they earn should be linked to how much of a drug they sell, and I don't think pharmaceutical companies should have commission-only sales reps.

And while I understand why, due to the specific nature of living on this tiny island, things are the way they are, here, I DON'T understand the current moves, in my own country, to systematically hand over medical care to the salesmen and profiteers of private enterprise who get rich off other people's pain, and put pressure on doctors to prescribe.








Sarkems
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RE: Prescription Drugs
Reply on October 18, 2017 04:11 AM
Interesting, Craig, I've always wondered about the signatures on passports. Why, for example, couldn't I sign somebody's passport photo when I was a factory worker, but I was deemed a 'trusted professional' when I was a civil servant. I was only an administrator, no more skilled or qualified than when I worked on the factory floor.

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RE: Prescription Drugs
Reply on October 18, 2017 04:42 AM << Modifed October 18 at 5:06AM >>

It just seems quite absurd to me, Emma. It's yet one more thing we all glibly accept without ever even questioning it. And there seems to be no rhyme nor reason to it.

I used to teach at technical college and university, many moons ago. But that wouldn't have qualified me as a notary. However, if I'd taught little kids, it would. And is accountancy, for example any more exacting or difficult than say being an astrophysicist, or a marine biologist? Yet, to the best of my knowledge these people don't qualify.

The icing on the cake, of course, is that being a minister of religion somehow makes a person honest and trustworthy.

Furthermore, even if these "professions" were invariably more difficult or required higher intelligence than the typical tradie or process worker possesses, why is this a requirement to witness a document? It's not rocket science. I would think the only criteria should be honesty.

Sorry for the tangent, but when I see teachers, for example, posting things on FB about how wonderful teachers are, or police or doctors blowing their own trumpets (or others blowing them for them), I just think of all the everyday people in hundreds of other jobs who are no less to be valued, and no less critical to our ability to function as a society. And it bothers me that we think there are any occupations which put a person's actions beyond scrutiny.



Sarkems
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RE: Prescription Drugs
Reply on October 18, 2017 07:21 AM << Modifed October 18 at 7:27AM >>
To be fair, I think the rash of posts about such professions is because many groups - teachers/doctors/police - are now suffering from the general belief that they are working for some sort of big organisation of control, and every two-bit Tom, Dick or Harry knows all about it because ... internet.

Such professions HAVE become devalued. I've lost track of the amount of stuff I've seen about how teachers are to blame for the state of kids today, or how doctors were baffled but some little old lady knows the cure, blah blah.

I certainly don't think we should blindly respect professionals, or assume they are always 'right' because of the label they have, but I do think that the trumpet blowing is in defence of such professions against the continual rantings of the 'experts' telling us they don't know what they're talking about.

This post wasn't intended to do that. It was intended to look at a problem that clearly exists, and what might have caused it. Not an attempt to suggest that doctors know nothing and we don't need them, or that there aren't times when we don't need painkillers. Because there are. But situations like we have here in the channel islands, and in that town, do arise, and we do need to look at the whys and wherefores, and what there is in society today which helps to enable this problem. and how best we might resolve it.

I haven't said anywhere that every doctor is a pill-pusher, or even that the blame rests entirely with them. Or that people shouldn't seek proper medical help when they need it. I think there are many contributing factors to the increase in dependence on prescription opiates, and I've outlined some of them from my own experience.

And, let's face it, if I talked about a town in a country with State healthcare, the likes of Recon would be straight here to tell me how it's all the government's fault, and it is a deliberate plan to dope people up, but when a private pharmaceutical company has a hand in it, that's fine and dandy.


   
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