Letters and Diary Poetry posted May 5, 2013


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Kyrielle Sonnet - Proposal from Pierre to Marie Curie

My Noble Prize

by ~Dovey

Minds entwined in cerebral dance,
Not probable as happenstance,
Nor given to philosophy,
Thus, chemistry proves destiny.

Your simple presence, dear Marie,
Sparks radioactivity,
So elemental, has to be;
Thus, chemistry proves destiny.

I see a noble in your eyes,
Become my queen, my crowning prize,
Where laws of physics govern thee,
Thus, chemistry proves destiny.

Minds entwined in cerebral dance,
Thus, chemistry proves destiny.


Love Letter Sonnet contest entry

Recognized


Many thanks to Angelheart for the artwork. :)

Kyrielle Sonnet


A Kyrielle Sonnet consists of 14 lines (three rhyming quatrain stanzas and a non-rhyming couplet). Just like the traditional Kyrielle poem, the Kyrielle Sonnet also has a repeating line or phrase as a refrain (usually appearing as the last line of each stanza). Each line within the Kyrielle Sonnet consists of only eight syllables. French poetry forms have a tendency to link back to the beginning of the poem, so common practice is to use the first and last line of the first quatrain as the ending couplet. This would also re-enforce the refrain within the poem. Therefore, a good rhyming scheme for a Kyrielle Sonnet would be:

AabB, ccbB, ddbB, AB -or- AbaB, cbcB, dbdB, AB.

I chose the Curies from a list of the top 20 lovers in history, their story, courtesy of Yahoo:

This is a story about partners in love and science. Unable to continue her studies in Poland because universities did not admit women, Maria Sklodowska Curie traveled to Paris in 1891 to attend the Sorbonne. Known by the French "Marie," she spent every spare hour reading in the library or in the laboratory. The industrious student caught the eye of Pierre Curie, director one of the laboratories where Marie worked. Curie ardently wooed Marie and made several marriage proposals. They were finally married in 1895 and began their famous partnership. In 1898 they discovered polonium and radium. The Curies and scientist Henri Becquerel won a Nobel Prize for Physics in 1903 for discovering radioactivity. When Curie died in 1904, Marie pledged to carry on their work. She took his place at the Sorbonne, becoming the school's first female teacher. In 1911 she became the first person to win a second Nobel Prize, this time for chemistry. She continued to experiment and lecture until her death of leukemia in 1934, driven by the memory of the man she loved.
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